Menu

 

Task Book: Biological & Physical Sciences Division and Human Research Program
Advanced Search     

Project Title:  Assessment of Operator Proficiency Following Long-Duration Spaceflight Reduce
Fiscal Year: FY 2012 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Start Date: 06/02/2009  
End Date: 09/05/2012  
Task Last Updated: 06/08/2012 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Moore, Steven T. Ph.D. / Mount Sinai School of Medicine 
Address:  Human Aerospace Laboratory 
Department of Neurology 
New York , NY 10029 
Email: s.moore@cqu.edu.au 
Phone: 212-241-1943  
Congressional District: 14 
Web:  
Organization Type: UNIVERSITY 
Organization Name: Mount Sinai School of Medicine 
Joint Agency:  
Comments: NOTE: PI moved to Central Queensland University, Australia, July 2016. 
Co-Investigator(s)
Affiliation: 
MacDougall, Hamish  University of Sydney (Australia) 
Key Personnel Changes / Previous PI: Co-Principal Investigator is Hamish MacDougall/University of Sydney (Australia).
Project Information: Grant/Contract No. NNX09AL14G 
Responsible Center: NASA JSC 
Grant Monitor: Loerch, Linda  
Center Contact:  
linda.loerch-1@nasa.gov 
Solicitation / Funding Source: 2008 Crew Health NNJ08ZSA002N 
Grant/Contract No.: NNX09AL14G 
Project Type: FLIGHT,GROUND 
Flight Program: Pre/Post Flight 
TechPort: No 
No. of Post Docs:
No. of PhD Candidates:
No. of Master's Candidates:  
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:  
No. of PhD Degrees:  
No. of Master's Degrees:
No. of Bachelor's Degrees:  
Human Research Program Elements: (1) HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Human Research Program Risks: (1) Sensorimotor:Risk of Altered Sensorimotor/Vestibular Function Impacting Critical Mission Tasks (Revised as of IRP Rev M)
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) SM2.1:Determine the changes in sensorimotor function over the course of a mission and during recovery after landing (IRP Rev F)
(2) SM6.1:Determine if sensorimotor dysfunction during and after long-duration spaceflight affects ability to control spacecraft and associated systems (IRP Rev F)
Flight Assignment/Project Notes: ISS

NOTE: End date is now 9/5/2012 per PI, D. Stillwell/JSC, and NSSC (Ed., 2/28/2013)

NOTE: End date is now 6/1/2013 per NSSC (Ed., 5/8/2012)

Task Description: Our NASA-funded research on head-eye coordination during simulated shuttle landings (Moore et al. 2008; Aviat Space Environ Med) and automobile control (MacDougall & Moore 2005; Optom Vis Sci) have demonstrated the feasibility of obtaining complex measures of sensorimotor function and operator proficiency in operational environments. In the current proposal we will extend these techniques to develop a compact (2.2 x 2.2 m footprint) stand-alone full-motion simulator and sensorimotor test device, suitable for installation at Russian or US post-landing data collection sites. The system utilizes a 6 degree-of-freedom Stewart platform, upon which a racing seat and visual displays are mounted. Based on a review of relevant in- and post-flight studies, we have developed a 30-min battery of tests to be performed on seated ISS crewmembers pre- and post-flight. The test battery targets cognitive, oculomotor, fine motor, and vestibular mechanisms potentially underlying post-flight deficits in operator performance. In addition, we will obtain subjective and objective measures of sleepiness and fatigue to control for the cumulative effects of in-flight sleep deprivation and workload on post-flight sensorimotor and operator function. The results from these test batteries will be correlated with astronaut performance on three operationally-relevant simulator tasks: control of an automobile, operation of a Mars rover, and T-38A Talon landing simulations. Total test time will be 60 min.

Our aim is to objectively define the effects of long-duration spaceflight on operator proficiency, and identify microgravity-related sensorimotor or cognitive deficits (or combinations thereof) underlying degradation of operator effectiveness. This study will answer four critical questions implicit in the IRP gap:

1. To what degree does long-duration spaceflight impair a crewmember’s ability to operate a vehicle or other machinery?

2. What sensorimotor/cognitive functions underlie degradation of operator proficiency?

3. Are sensorimotor countermeasures required for lunar/Martian landings and surface operations?

4. If so, what areas should these countermeasures target?

Research Impact/Earth Benefits: The techniques developed as part of this grant have potential application to assessment and rehabilitation of patients with a variety of neurological conditions, such as stroke, traumatic brain injury, and vestibular disease.

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2012 
Task Progress: This project requires the development of full motion simulators to perform both sensorimotor tests and operator proficiency assessments during simulated landings in a T-38 jet, driving a car, and operating a Mars rover. In April 2011 we completed installation of the primary system at NASA JSC. Backup systems have also been installed at the Human Aerospace Laboratory at Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York, and the University of Sydney. The Sydney system has been utilized for development of experimental hardware and the New York system was used to develop and test experimental software. The JSC system is for pre and post-flight testing of astronaut subjects.

Each system is based on a 6 degree-of-freedom stewart platform (V7, CKAS, Melbourne, Australia). A cylindrical polypropylene water tank (2.2 m diameter; 1.7 m height) formed the cabin, and was attached to a 50mm thick plywood base bolted to the motion platform. Three ceiling mounted short-throw DLP projectors (BENQ 515ST) provide a 180 deg field-of-view display. Subjects are placed in a racing seat and restrained by a 4-point harness (Corbeau A4, USA). The control pod includes a steering wheel and joystick, and three pedals (outer pedals used for rudder input during flight; right and middle pedal used for accelerator and brake for driving simulations). The simulator can be used for a variety of full-motion scenarios. To date we have implemented commercially available PC flight (X-plane and Microsoft) and driving (rfactor) simulations; and a custom developed simulation of a Mars rover operation.

In second year of this project, we focused on implementation and validation of these simulations in preparation for baseline data collection. In addition, the simulator performs a variety of sensorimotor assessments including manual tracking, motion perception, and oculomotor function.

Driving Task

Objective: Drive a vehicle (Lexus ISF) along a 5 km winding mountain road as quickly and safely as possible within the maximum speed limit (55 mph).

Measures: Average speed; braking at turns; speed during turns; lane deviations (number of times outside of lane, time to recover); collisions

Flight Task

Objective: Perform T-38 landings (3) at Ellington field runway 17R (initial conditions 3 NM from runway, 1500 ft altitude, 300 KIAS; using a modified overhead square pattern.

Measures: Flaps, gear-down; appropriate airspeed during closed pattern; touchdown speed.

Mars Rover Task

Objective: Perform rover navigation and docking tasks.

Measures: Accuracy in indicating initial direction to target; time to complete surface transit to docking target; time to complete the docking maneuver

Year 2 Project Milestones

April 2011: The pre/post-flight experimental system at JSC successfully passed a final delta User Readiness Review (URR) and Test Readiness Review (TRR) and is man-rated by the JSC safety panel.

June 2011: Project selected for flight.

September 2011: Informed consent briefings for Increment 33/34 (prime and backup)

December 2011: First two subjects signed up for experiment.

February 2012: Complete end-to-end run of entire protocol successfully performed for NASA management, including Linda Loerch and Peter Norsk.

March 2012: Experiment Document submitted; project gained CPHS approval.

July/August 2012: Pre-flight data collection scheduled on first subject.

EDITOR'S NOTE (3/5/2013): In order to continue work on the flight phase of this project, it was requested by the PI that the new award (NNX12AM25G) commence 9/6/2012. See project with same title appended with NNX12AM25G for subsequent reporting.

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 09/07/2020)  Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
Articles in Peer-reviewed Journals Moore ST, MacDougall HG. "Journey to Mars: Physiological effects and operational consequences of long-duration microgravity exposure." J Cosmol. 2010 Oct- Nov;12:3781-93. http://journalofcosmology.com/Mars127.html , Nov-2010
Articles in Peer-reviewed Journals Shine JM, Naismith SL, Palavra NC, Lewis SJ, Moore ST, Dilda V, Morris TR. "Attentional set-shifting deficits correlate with the severity of freezing of gait in Parkinson's disease." Parkinsonism Relat Disord. 2013 Mar;19(3):388-90. Epub 2012 Aug 18. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.parkreldis.2012.07.015 ; PubMed PMID: 22906729 , Mar-2013
Articles in Peer-reviewed Journals Shine JM, Moore ST, Bolitho SJ, Morris TR, Dilda V, Naismith SL, Lewis SJ. "Assessing the utility of Freezing of Gait Questionnaires in Parkinson's Disease." Parkinsonism Relat Disord. 2012 Jan;18(1):25-9 Epub 2011 Aug 26. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.parkreldis.2011.08.002 ; PubMed PMID: 21872523 , Jan-2012
Articles in Peer-reviewed Journals Morris TR, Cho C, Dilda V, Shine JM, Naismith SL, Lewis SJ, Moore ST. "A comparison of clinical and objective measures of freezing of gait in Parkinson's disease." Parkinsonism Relat Disord. 2012 Jun;18(5):572-7. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.parkreldis.2012.03.001 ; PubMed PMID: 22445248 , Jun-2012
Articles in Peer-reviewed Journals Shine JM, Matar E, Bolitho SJ, Dilda V, Morris TR, Naismith SL, Moore ST, Lewis SJ. "Modeling freezing of gait in Parkinson's disease with a virtual reality paradigm." Gait Posture. 2013 May;38(1):104-8. Epub 2012 Dec 4. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gaitpost.2012.10.026 ; PubMed PMID: 23218729 , May-2013
Project Title:  Assessment of Operator Proficiency Following Long-Duration Spaceflight Reduce
Fiscal Year: FY 2011 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Start Date: 06/02/2009  
End Date: 09/05/2012  
Task Last Updated: 03/14/2011 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Moore, Steven T. Ph.D. / Mount Sinai School of Medicine 
Address:  Human Aerospace Laboratory 
Department of Neurology 
New York , NY 10029 
Email: s.moore@cqu.edu.au 
Phone: 212-241-1943  
Congressional District: 14 
Web:  
Organization Type: UNIVERSITY 
Organization Name: Mount Sinai School of Medicine 
Joint Agency:  
Comments: NOTE: PI moved to Central Queensland University, Australia, July 2016. 
Co-Investigator(s)
Affiliation: 
MacDougall, Hamish  University of Sydney (Australia) 
Key Personnel Changes / Previous PI: Co-Principal Investigator is Hamish MacDougall/University of Sydney (Australia).
Project Information: Grant/Contract No. NNX09AL14G 
Responsible Center: NASA JSC 
Grant Monitor: Baumann, David  
Center Contact:  
david.k.baumann@nasa.gov 
Solicitation / Funding Source: 2008 Crew Health NNJ08ZSA002N 
Grant/Contract No.: NNX09AL14G 
Project Type: FLIGHT,GROUND 
Flight Program: Pre/Post Flight 
TechPort: No 
No. of Post Docs:
No. of PhD Candidates:
No. of Master's Candidates:  
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:  
No. of PhD Degrees:  
No. of Master's Degrees:  
No. of Bachelor's Degrees:  
Human Research Program Elements: (1) HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Human Research Program Risks: (1) Sensorimotor:Risk of Altered Sensorimotor/Vestibular Function Impacting Critical Mission Tasks (Revised as of IRP Rev M)
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) SM2.1:Determine the changes in sensorimotor function over the course of a mission and during recovery after landing (IRP Rev F)
(2) SM6.1:Determine if sensorimotor dysfunction during and after long-duration spaceflight affects ability to control spacecraft and associated systems (IRP Rev F)
Flight Assignment/Project Notes: NOTE: End date is now 9/5/2012 per PI, D. Stillwell/JSC, and NSSC (Ed., 2/28/2013)

NOTE: End date is now 6/1/2013 per NSSC (Ed., 5/8/2012)

Task Description: Long-term exposure to microgravity has the potential to negatively impact the ability of crewmembers to navigate and land the crew exploration vehicle and perform post-landing surface operations on Mars. Based on our NASA-funded research on head-eye coordination during simulated shuttle landings and automobile control, we will implement a battery of tests, to be performed seated pre- and post-flight on ISS crewmembers, that target physiological mechanisms potentially underlying post-flight deficiencies in manual control. We will develop a portable testing device utilizing a chair mounted on a 6 degree-of-freedom motion base, suitable for implementation at Russian or US post-landing data collection sites. Sensorimotor tests target the vestibulo-ocular reflex, vestibulo-collic reflex, pursuit, dynamic visual acuity, motion perception and manual dexterity. In addition, we will adapt a subset of the computer-based cognitive Test of Basic Aviation Skills, used in pilot selection by the US Air Force, that have demonstrated a significant correlation with subject performance during actual flight training. The results from these test batteries will be correlated with astronaut performance on three operationally-relevant simulator tasks: control of an automobile, landing a T-38, and operating a Mars rover. Our primary aim is to define the effects of long-duration spaceflight on operator proficiency, and identify microgravity-related sensorimotor or cognitive deficits (or combinations thereof) associated with degradation of operator effectiveness. Successful completion of this study will not only fill the IRP gap SM6, but provide a basis for countermeasure development that could be incorporated into pre- and in-flight training.

Research Impact/Earth Benefits: The techniques developed as part of this grant have potential application to assessment and rehabilitation of patients with a variety of neurological conditions, such as stroke.

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2011 
Task Progress: In the past year we have built and installed three fully operational flight simulators; at Johnson Space Center in Houston (for pre- and post-flight testing); Mt Sinai School of Medicine in New York (used for development and validation of the test and simulation software); and the University of Sydney (for hardware development/testing under the supervision of Dr. MacDougall). In January 2011 we passed a User Readiness Review (URR) and Test Readiness Reveiw (TRR) of the experiment hardware (simulator) which is now approved for use with human subjects. In April 2011 we will finalize the instrument pod inside the simulators with the addition of a removable steering wheel and a set of 3 pedals (the center/right pedals used for brake/accelerator for driving simulations; the outside pedals used for rudder control during flight simulations), to complement the existing joystick (used for flight and rover control).

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 09/07/2020)  Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
 None in FY 2011
Project Title:  Assessment of Operator Proficiency Following Long-Duration Spaceflight Reduce
Fiscal Year: FY 2010 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Start Date: 06/02/2009  
End Date: 06/01/2012  
Task Last Updated: 02/07/2011 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Moore, Steven T. Ph.D. / Mount Sinai School of Medicine 
Address:  Human Aerospace Laboratory 
Department of Neurology 
New York , NY 10029 
Email: s.moore@cqu.edu.au 
Phone: 212-241-1943  
Congressional District: 14 
Web:  
Organization Type: UNIVERSITY 
Organization Name: Mount Sinai School of Medicine 
Joint Agency:  
Comments: NOTE: PI moved to Central Queensland University, Australia, July 2016. 
Co-Investigator(s)
Affiliation: 
MacDougall, Hamish  University of Sydney (Australia) 
Key Personnel Changes / Previous PI: Co-Principal Investigator is Hamish MacDougall/University of Sydney (Australia).
Project Information: Grant/Contract No. NNX09AL14G 
Responsible Center: NASA JSC 
Grant Monitor: Norsk, Peter  
Center Contact:  
Peter.norsk@nasa.gov 
Solicitation / Funding Source: 2008 Crew Health NNJ08ZSA002N 
Grant/Contract No.: NNX09AL14G 
Project Type: FLIGHT 
Flight Program: Pre/Post Flight 
TechPort: No 
No. of Post Docs:
No. of PhD Candidates:
No. of Master's Candidates:  
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:  
No. of PhD Degrees:  
No. of Master's Degrees:  
No. of Bachelor's Degrees:  
Human Research Program Elements: (1) HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Human Research Program Risks: (1) Sensorimotor:Risk of Altered Sensorimotor/Vestibular Function Impacting Critical Mission Tasks (Revised as of IRP Rev M)
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) SM2.1:Determine the changes in sensorimotor function over the course of a mission and during recovery after landing (IRP Rev F)
(2) SM6.1:Determine if sensorimotor dysfunction during and after long-duration spaceflight affects ability to control spacecraft and associated systems (IRP Rev F)
Task Description: Long-term exposure to microgravity has the potential to negatively impact the ability of crewmembers to navigate and land the crew exploration vehicle and perform post-landing surface operations on Mars. Based on our NASA-funded research on head-eye coordination during simulated shuttle landings and automobile control, we will implement a battery of tests, to be performed seated pre- and post-flight on ISS crewmembers, that target physiological mechanisms potentially underlying post-flight deficiencies in manual control. We will develop a portable testing device utilizing a chair mounted on a 6 degree-of-freedom motion base, suitable for implementation at Russian or US post-landing data collection sites. Sensorimotor tests target the vestibulo-ocular reflex, vestibulo-collic reflex, pursuit, dynamic visual acuity, motion perception and manual dexterity. In addition, we will adapt a subset of the computer-based cognitive Test of Basic Aviation Skills, used in pilot selection by the US Air Force, that have demonstrated a significant correlation with subject performance during actual flight training. The results from these test batteries will be correlated with astronaut performance on two operationally-relevant simulator tasks: control of an automobile and teleoperation of a robotic arm. Our primary aim is to define the effects of long-duration spaceflight on operator proficiency, and identify microgravity-related sensorimotor or cognitive deficits (or combinations thereof) associated with degradation of operator effectiveness. Successful completion of this study will not only fill the IRP gap SM6, but provide a basis for countermeasure development that could be incorporated into pre- and in-flight training.

Research Impact/Earth Benefits: The techniques developed as part of this grant have potential application to assessment and rehabilitation of patients with a variety of neurological conditions, such as stroke.

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2010 
Task Progress: Progress 9/30/2009 - 4/7/2010

This project requires the development of three full motion simulators to perform both sensorimotor tests and operator proficiency assessments during simulated landings in a T-38 jet, driving a car, operating a lunar/mars rover, and teleoperation of a robotic arm. The systems are to be based at the Human Aerospace Laboratory at Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York, Johnson Space Center in Houston, and the University of Sydney. The New York and Sydney systems are being used to develop and test experimental hardware and software. The Houston system is for pre- and post-flight testing.

In the first 6 months of funding (from September 30 2009) three motion bases (CKAS V7 6D0F Stewart platform) have been procured and installed in New York, Houston, and in Dr. Hamish MacDougall's laboratory at the University of Sydney. Development of the simulator cabin (including subject seating and visual displays) is currently being conducted in Sydney. The display system has been completed and installed in all 3 simulators, based on three short-throw digital laser projectors (Benq MP515ST). The flight system (at JSC) has successfully completed the Test Readiness Review and is now 'man-rated' by NASA safety. Final installation of the control pod, with steering wheel, pedals and joystick, will take place in April 2011 at JSC.

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 09/07/2020)  Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
 None in FY 2010
Project Title:  Assessment of Operator Proficiency Following Long-Duration Spaceflight Reduce
Fiscal Year: FY 2009 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Start Date: 06/02/2009  
End Date: 06/01/2012  
Task Last Updated: 08/14/2009 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Moore, Steven T. Ph.D. / Mount Sinai School of Medicine 
Address:  Human Aerospace Laboratory 
Department of Neurology 
New York , NY 10029 
Email: s.moore@cqu.edu.au 
Phone: 212-241-1943  
Congressional District: 14 
Web:  
Organization Type: UNIVERSITY 
Organization Name: Mount Sinai School of Medicine 
Joint Agency:  
Comments: NOTE: PI moved to Central Queensland University, Australia, July 2016. 
Co-Investigator(s)
Affiliation: 
MacDougall, Hamish  University of Sydney (Australia) 
Key Personnel Changes / Previous PI: Co-Principal Investigator is Hamish MacDougall/University of Sydney (Australia).
Project Information: Grant/Contract No. NNX09AL14G 
Responsible Center: NASA JSC 
Grant Monitor: Meck, J@n  
Center Contact: 281-244-5405 
janice.v.meck@nasa.gov 
Solicitation / Funding Source: 2008 Crew Health NNJ08ZSA002N 
Grant/Contract No.: NNX09AL14G 
Project Type: FLIGHT,GROUND 
Flight Program: Pre/Post Flight 
TechPort: No 
No. of Post Docs:  
No. of PhD Candidates:  
No. of Master's Candidates:  
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:  
No. of PhD Degrees:  
No. of Master's Degrees:  
No. of Bachelor's Degrees:  
Human Research Program Elements: (1) HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Human Research Program Risks: (1) Sensorimotor:Risk of Altered Sensorimotor/Vestibular Function Impacting Critical Mission Tasks (Revised as of IRP Rev M)
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) SM2.1:Determine the changes in sensorimotor function over the course of a mission and during recovery after landing (IRP Rev F)
(2) SM6.1:Determine if sensorimotor dysfunction during and after long-duration spaceflight affects ability to control spacecraft and associated systems (IRP Rev F)
Task Description: Long-term exposure to microgravity has the potential to negatively impact the ability of crewmembers to navigate and land the crew exploration vehicle and perform post-landing surface operations on Mars. Based on our NASA-funded research on head-eye coordination during simulated shuttle landings and automobile control, we will implement a battery of tests, to be performed seated pre- and post-flight on ISS crewmembers, that target physiological mechanisms potentially underlying post-flight deficiencies in manual control. We will develop a portable testing device utilizing a chair mounted on a 6 degree-of-freedom motion base, suitable for implementation at Russian or US post-landing data collection sites. Sensorimotor tests target the vestibulo-ocular reflex, vestibulo-collic reflex, pursuit, dynamic visual acuity, motion perception and manual dexterity. In addition, we will adapt a subset of the computer-based cognitive Test of Basic Aviation Skills, used in pilot selection by the US Air Force, that have demonstrated a significant correlation with subject performance during actual flight training. The results from these test batteries will be correlated with astronaut performance on two operationally-relevant simulator tasks: control of an automobile and teleoperation of a robotic arm. Our primary aim is to define the effects of long-duration spaceflight on operator proficiency, and identify microgravity-related sensorimotor or cognitive deficits (or combinations thereof) associated with degradation of operator effectiveness. Successful completion of this study will not only fill the IRP gap SM6, but provide a basis for countermeasure development that could be incorporated into pre- and in-flight training.

Research Impact/Earth Benefits: 0

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2009 
Task Progress: New project for FY2009.

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 09/07/2020)  Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
 None in FY 2009