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The NASA Task Book

This Task Book is an online database of research projects supported by NASA's Biological & Physical Sciences (BPS) Division and Human Research Program. Beginning in October 2017, the Task Book has included projects within the Translational Research Institute for Space Health (TRISH). The Task Book database also covers BPS projects in the Established Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR) from October 2020 to the present. Completed investigations under the National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) may also be found in the Task Book.

Visitors to the NASA Task Book can view project descriptions, annual progress, final reports, and bibliographical listings of publications resulting from NASA-funded studies in Space Biology, Physical Sciences, and Human Research. Visitors can also learn about the potential impact of these studies and the anticipated benefits that such research could offer to Earth.

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Image Crewmembers will perform a lunar landing simulation using rotational (RHC) and translational (THC) hand controllers and using a combination of flight guidance, navigation and control displays as well as out of window displays. This task will be performed pre and postflight on a six degree-of-freedom...
Image Courtesy image submitted to Task Book.
Image Dr. Beth Lewandowski and Courtney Schkurko working with a Tempus Advanced Life Support (ALS) medical device in preparation for an International Space Station (ISS) technology demonstration. Courtesy image submitted to Task Book.
Image Parabolic Flight Rig for Flow Boiling and Flow Condensation. Credit: I. Mudawar. Courtesy image submitted to Task Book.
Image The CHAPEA habitat, created with 3D printing technology, will house 4-person crews for 1-year simulated Mars missions. Credit: ICON. Courtesy image submitted to Task Book.
Image RR-26 patch designed by James Bushong. Courtesy image submitted to Task Book.
Image Line chilldown and transfer process onboard the International Space Station with experimentation and computational fluid dynamics simulations. Courtesy image submitted to Task Book.
Image Team member performing a dynamic walking task while wearing our proposed sensorimotor disruption analog. Courtesy image submitted to Task Book.
Image Expedition 65 Flight Engineers Mark Vande Hei, Megan McArthur, Shane Kimbrough, and Thomas Pesquet participate in robotics training in preparation to support two spacewalks (Credit: NASA). Courtesy image submitted to Task Book.
Image Courtesy image submitted to Task Book.