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Task Book: Biological & Physical Sciences Division and Human Research Program

Task Book: Biological & Physical Sciences Division and Human Research Program is an online database of research projects supported by the Space Biology and Physical Sciences research areas within the Biological & Physical Sciences (BPS) Division of NASA's Science Mission Directorate, and the Human Research Program in NASA's Human Exploration and Operations (HEO) Mission Directorate. Research projects within the Translational Research Institute for Space Health (TRISH) are included, beginning with FY2017 projects. The database also includes research projects of the National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI), all completed by May 2017.

Database information includes project descriptions, annual or final research results, Earth benefits and research impacts, and listings of publications resulting from the NASA-funded research.

Formerly the Space Life & Physical Sciences Research & Applications (SLPSRA) Division Task Book, the Space Biology and Physical Sciences programs transferred to the Science Mission Directorate in July 2020.

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Image Courtesy image submitted to Task Book.
Image Single neuron genetic sensor of brain genomic instability after exposure to space radiation. The image represents a 3D reconstruction of tissue cleared volume imaging of the genetic sensor labeled neurons (red) in mouse hippocampus (green). Credit: Xiao-Hong Lu and Xinli Tian. Courtesy image submitt...
Image Overview of experimental approach to understanding the potential role of the endothelium in internal jugular vein thrombosis among crewmembers onboard the International Space Station (ISS). Courtesy image submitted to Task Book.
Image Subjects’ motion will be recorded during 4 tasks performed in various gravity levels: jumping down (A), walking an obstacle course (B), maintaining a tandem stance (C), and standing up from a prone position (D). Credit NASA. Courtesy image submitted to Task Book.
Image Courtesy image submitted to Task Book.
Image A six degree-of-freedom motion base will be used to simulate capsule wave movements as the motion sickness stressor test to evaluate the efficacy of intranasal scopolamine and/or sensory augmentation to enhance performance during recovery operations. Credit: NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) Neuroscie...
Image Dr. Albert J. Fornace (Principal Investigator). Courtesy image submitted to Task Book.
Image Our three investigations (a-c) leverage flight-certified hardware and apply cutting edge techniques to enumerate and characterize antibiotic resistant organisms on the International Space Station (ISS), address critical knowledge gaps with regard to enterococci, and inform countermeasure development...
Image Using mice that received whole-body space radiation at astronaut-age, Eisch Lab members of Team NASA have found improved pattern separation in both aversive and appetitive tasks, including performance on a touchscreen task for location discrimination (LD). Courtesy image submitted to Task Book.
Image A Zoom meeting between collaborators and the experiment stimuli (a medical ventilator). From left to right, top to bottom: Amita Karunakaran (Georgia Tech), Imani Murph (North Carolina State University), Maribeth Gandy Coleman (Georgia Tech, Co-Investigator), Vicky Byrne (KBR Co-Investigator), Scott...