Menu

 

The NASA Task Book
Advanced Search     

Project Title:  IntraVenous Fluid GENeration for Exploration Missions (IVGEN) Reduce
Fiscal Year: FY 2011 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP ExMC:Exploration Medical Capabilities
Start Date: 04/01/2006  
End Date: 08/31/2011  
Task Last Updated: 10/11/2011 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   McQuillen, John   / NASA Glenn Research Center 
Address:  21000 Brookpark Road 
77-5 
Cleveland , OH 44135 
Email: John.B.McQuillen@nasa.gov 
Phone: 216-433-2876  
Congressional District: 10 
Web:  
Organization Type: NASA CENTER 
Organization Name: NASA Glenn Research Center 
Joint Agency:  
Comments:  
Project Information: Grant/Contract No. Directed Research 
Responsible Center: NASA JSC 
Grant Monitor: Watkins, Sharmi1a  
Center Contact: 281.483.0395 
sharmila.watkins@nasa.gov 
Solicitation / Funding Source: Directed Research 
Grant/Contract No.: Directed Research 
Project Type: FLIGHT 
Flight Program: Shuttle/ISS 
TechPort: Yes 
No. of Post Docs:
No. of PhD Candidates:
No. of Master's Candidates:
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:
No. of PhD Degrees:
No. of Master's Degrees:
No. of Bachelor's Degrees:
Human Research Program Elements: (1) ExMC:Exploration Medical Capabilities
Human Research Program Risks: (1) ExMC:Risk of Unacceptable Health and Mission Outcomes Due to Limitations of In-flight Medical Capabilities (IRP Rev E)
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) ExMC 4.12:We do not have the capability to generate and utilize sterile intravenous fluid from potable water during exploration missions (IRP Rev E)
Flight Assignment/Project Notes: ISS ; STS-131

Task Description: The ability to generate intravenous (IV) fluids for medical care from available spacecraft potable or technical water supplies will greatly reduce launch mass for NASA's future exploration class missions. In spite of designing and testing several systems, NASA has not yet met that goal. As a result, NASA’s Human Research Program initiated a detailed effort examining several different technologies for first purifying water and then mixing effectively with appropriate solutes.

IntraVenous Fluid GENeration for Exploration Missions (IVGEN) will demonstrate a microgravity compatible water purification to the standards required for intravenous administration, and a pharmaceutical mixing system. This hardware is a prototype that will allow flight surgeons more options to treat ill or injured crewmembers during future long-duration exploration missions.

Trade studies were used to down-select different technologies based on minimizing mass, volume, and power requirements. Experiments were conducted in normal and short duration reduced gravity facilities to verify actual performance of the selected technologies.

Pressure driven systems with a gas-liquid separator and a DI (deionization) cartridge have been shown to generate Sterile Water for Injection per the United States Pharmacopeia (USP) standards. Furthermore, by pre-positioning a sterile magnetic stir bar and salt within an IV (intravenous) bag, the desired medical solution can be quickly and effectively generated.

Given the limitations with both the normal gravity and ground-based reduced gravity testing, these results need to be verified on orbit using a prototype. Further, an appropriate system level test should be conducted prior to deployment. Accordingly, the objectives of this experiment include the following:

• Produce an acceptable IV solution that meets USP requirements

• Verify on orbit, using available microgravity-compatible technology and techniques, the acceptability of that solution, and

• Obtain sufficient engineering data to permit scaling of the system per actual mission needs

• Demonstrate end-to-end system level performance

See also https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/experiments/explorer/Investigation.html?#id=689

Research Impact/Earth Benefits: IVGEN technology could be used on Earth to generate purified water and IV fluid in Third World countries where medical resources are limited.

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2011 
Task Progress: During the past year, electronic data was analyzed. A plan was developed and implemented to ascertain the cause for not meeting the USP target for acceptable saline concentration in the two samples that were produced. For the first case, the cause was attributed to the introduction of a larger than acceptable air bubble into the liquid feed. For the second case, the cause was that an insufficient amount of salt was premeasured into the mixing bags. A final report was generated--see Bibliography section.

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 09/07/2020) 

Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
NASA Technical Documents McQuillen JB, McKay TL, Griffin DW, Brown DF, Zoldak JT. "Final Report for Intravenous Fluid Generation (IVGEN) Spaceflight Experiment." Washington, D.C. : National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 2011. NASA technical memorandum ; NASA/TM-2011-217033. https://ntrs.nasa.gov/citations/20110014585 , Jul-2011
Project Title:  IntraVenous Fluid GENeration for Exploration Missions (IVGEN) Reduce
Fiscal Year: FY 2010 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP ExMC:Exploration Medical Capabilities
Start Date: 04/01/2006  
End Date: 08/31/2011  
Task Last Updated: 07/02/2010 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   McQuillen, John   / NASA Glenn Research Center 
Address:  21000 Brookpark Road 
77-5 
Cleveland , OH 44135 
Email: John.B.McQuillen@nasa.gov 
Phone: 216-433-2876  
Congressional District: 10 
Web:  
Organization Type: NASA CENTER 
Organization Name: NASA Glenn Research Center 
Joint Agency:  
Comments:  
Project Information: 
Responsible Center: NASA JSC 
Grant Monitor: Watkins, Sharmi1a  
Center Contact: 281.483.0395 
sharmila.watkins@nasa.gov 
Solicitation / Funding Source: Directed Research 
Project Type: FLIGHT 
Flight Program: Shuttle/ISS 
TechPort: Yes 
No. of Post Docs:
No. of PhD Candidates:
No. of Master's Candidates:
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:
No. of PhD Degrees:
No. of Master's Degrees:
No. of Bachelor's Degrees:
Human Research Program Elements: (1) ExMC:Exploration Medical Capabilities
Human Research Program Risks: (1) ExMC:Risk of Unacceptable Health and Mission Outcomes Due to Limitations of In-flight Medical Capabilities (IRP Rev E)
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) ExMC 4.12:We do not have the capability to generate and utilize sterile intravenous fluid from potable water during exploration missions (IRP Rev E)
Flight Assignment/Project Notes: ISS ; STS-131

Task Description: The ability to generate intravenous (IV) fluids for medical care from available spacecraft potable or technical water supplies will greatly reduce launch mass for NASA's future exploration class missions. In spite of designing and testing several systems, NASA has not yet met that goal. As a result, NASA’s Human Research program initiated a detailed effort examining several different technologies for first purifying water and then mixing effectively with appropriate solutes.

IntraVenous Fluid GENeration for Exploration Missions (IVGEN) will demonstrate a microgravity compatible water purification to the standards required for intravenous administration, and a pharmaceutical mixing system. This hardware is a prototype that will allow flight surgeons more options to treat ill or injured crewmembers during future long-duration exploration missions.

Trade studies were used to down-select different technologies based on minimizing mass, volume, and power requirements. Experiments were conducted in normal and short duration reduced gravity facilities to verify actual performance of the selected technologies.

Pressure driven systems with a gas-liquid separator and a DI cartridge have been shown to generate Sterile Water for Injection per the USP standards. Furthermore, by pre-positioning a sterile magnetic stir bar and salt within an IV bag, the desired medical solution can be quickly and effectively generated.

Given the limitations with both the normal gravity and ground-based reduced gravity testing, these results need to be verified on orbit using a prototope. Further, an appropriate system level test should be conducted prior to deployment. Accordingly, the objectives of this experiment include the following: • Produce an acceptable IV solution that meets USP requirements • Verify on orbit, using available microgravity-compatible technology and techniques, the acceptability of that solution, and • Obtain sufficient engineering data to permit scaling of the system per actual mission needs. • Demonstrate end-to-end system level performance

See also http://spaceflightsystems.grc.nasa.gov/Advanced/HumanResearch/Medical/IVFluids/

Research Impact/Earth Benefits: IVGEN technology could be used on Earth to generate purified water and IV fluid in Third World countries where medical resources are limited.

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2010 
Task Progress: During the past year, the project initiated studies with a different deionizing resin because of concerns regarding the shelf life of the stored resin. In addition, an additional level of hermetic sealing was added, namely, a thermally sealed packet around the DI cartridge.

Studies were initiated to examine the effect of water temperature on both the hydrodynamic and purification ability of the DI cartridge.

A consultant, who specializes in USP certified water purification techniques review the IV-Gen process and found that for potable water from the ISS Water Processing Assembly (WPA), the IV-Gen process was acceptable; however, he also recommended that an activated carbon filter be incorporated into the design of any future exploration system that did not include such a feature.

Finally, the project underwent a system acceptance review and hardware was delivered to NASA KSC. The experiment was launched aboard STS-131 and operations were conducted in May 2010 during Increment 23/24.

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 09/07/2020) 

Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
Abstracts for Journals and Proceedings McQuillen JB, McKay TL, Brown DF, Zoldak JT, Griffin DW. "The IntraVenous Fluid Generation Experiment (IV-Gen)." NASA Human Research Program Investigators' Workshop, Houston, TX, February 2010.

NASA Human Research Program Investigators' Workshop, February 2010. , Feb-2010

Abstracts for Journals and Proceedings McQuillen JB, McKay TL. "The IntraVenous Fluid Generation (IV-Gen) Experiment." Aerospace Medical Association 81st Annual Scientific Meeting, Phoenix, AZ, May 2010.

Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine 2010 Mar;81(3):264. , Mar-2010

Abstracts for Journals and Proceedings McQuillen JB, Weaver AS. "The fluidic challenges for emergency medical injections during extravehicular activity." Aerospace Medical Association 81st Annual Scientific Meeting, Phoenix, AZ, May 2010.

Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine 2010 Mar;81(3):263-4. , Mar-2010

Project Title:  IntraVenous Fluid GENeration for Exploration Missions (IVGEN) Reduce
Fiscal Year: FY 2009 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP ExMC:Exploration Medical Capabilities
Start Date: 04/01/2006  
End Date: 08/31/2011  
Task Last Updated: 05/15/2009 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   McQuillen, John   / NASA Glenn Research Center 
Address:  21000 Brookpark Road 
77-5 
Cleveland , OH 44135 
Email: John.B.McQuillen@nasa.gov 
Phone: 216-433-2876  
Congressional District: 10 
Web:  
Organization Type: NASA CENTER 
Organization Name: NASA Glenn Research Center 
Joint Agency:  
Comments:  
Project Information: 
Responsible Center: NASA JSC 
Grant Monitor: Watkins, Sharmi1a  
Center Contact: 281.483.0395 
sharmila.watkins@nasa.gov 
Solicitation / Funding Source: Directed Research 
Project Type: FLIGHT 
Flight Program: ISS 
TechPort: Yes 
No. of Post Docs:
No. of PhD Candidates:
No. of Master's Candidates:
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:
No. of PhD Degrees:
No. of Master's Degrees:
No. of Bachelor's Degrees:
Human Research Program Elements: (1) ExMC:Exploration Medical Capabilities
Human Research Program Risks: (1) ExMC:Risk of Unacceptable Health and Mission Outcomes Due to Limitations of In-flight Medical Capabilities (IRP Rev E)
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) ExMC 4.12:We do not have the capability to generate and utilize sterile intravenous fluid from potable water during exploration missions (IRP Rev E)
Flight Assignment/Project Notes: ISS

Task Description: The ability to generate intravenous (IV) fluids for medical care from available spacecraft potable or technical water supplies will greatly reduce launch mass for NASA's future exploration class missions. In spite of designing and testing several systems, NASA has not yet met that goal. As a result, NASA’s Human Research program initiated a detailed effort examining several different technologies for first purifying water and then mixing effectively with appropriate solutes.

IntraVenous Fluid GENeration for Exploration Missions (IVGEN) will demonstrate a microgravity compatible water purification to the standards required for intravenous administration, and a pharmaceutical mixing system. This hardware is a prototype that will allow flight surgeons more options to treat ill or injured crewmembers during future long-duration exploration missions.

Trade studies were used to down-select different technologies based on minimizing mass, volume, and power requirements. Experiments were conducted in normal and short duration reduced gravity facilities to verify actual performance of the selected technologies.

Pressure driven systems with a gas-liquid separator and a DI cartridge have been shown to generate Sterile Water for Injection per the USP standards. Furthermore, by pre-positioning a sterile magnetic stir bar and salt within an IV bag, the desired medical solution can be quickly and effectively generated.

Given the limitations with both the normal gravity and ground-based reduced gravity testing, these results need to be verified on orbit using a prototope. Further, an appropriate system level test should be conducted prior to deployment. Accordingly, the objectives of this experiment include the following: • Produce an acceptable IV solution that meets USP requirements • Verify on orbit, using available microgravity-compatible technology and techniques, the acceptability of that solution, and • Obtain sufficient engineering data to permit scaling of the system per actual mission needs. • Demonstrate end-to-end system level performance

Research Impact/Earth Benefits: IVGEN technology could be used on Earth to generate purified water and IV fluid in Third World countries where medical resources are limited.

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2009 
Task Progress: Activity on this effort has been focused on the definition and development of a space-flight experiment for testing aboard the International Space Station in the Microgravity Science Glovebox. Tasks have included trade studies of available technologies; reduced gravity testing of mixing and filling techniques, gas-liquid separators, and bubble trapping within a specialized conductivity cell; and normal gravity testing of water purification techniques.

Trade studies incorporated both analysis and reduced gravity and normal gravity experimentation as appropriate. Studies that were conducted included an examination of different fluid mixing techniques that would be applicable in reduced gravity. These techniques include bag to bag transfer of fluids, kneading of IV bag, magnetic stir bar and impellor technology. Eventually, the magnetic stir bar technique was selected and verified in reduced gravity. An additional trade study was conducted that examined water purification techniques such as distillation, reverse osmosis, ultrafiltration, deionizing packed beds, and microwave technology. Based on filtration performance, system size and weight, and power consumption, a technique using deionizing packed beds coupled with sterilizing filters was selected.

Besides trades studies and experimental work, activities during the past year include generating an Exploration Investigation Requirements Document (EIRD) and conducting both a preliminary design review (PDR), critical design review (CDR)

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 09/07/2020) 

Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
Dissertations and Theses Barlow KL. "Intravenous fluid mixing times quantified using planar laser-induced fluorescence." Master’s Thesis, Case Western Reserve University, January 2007. , Jan-2007
NASA Technical Documents Niederhaus CE, Miller FJ. "Intravenous Fluid Mixing in Normal, Partial, and Micro- Gravity: Down-selection of Mixing Methods." Washington, DC : National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 2008. NASA technical memorandum TM-2008-215000. https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/20080012740.pdf ; accessed 11/13/19. , Jan-2008
NASA Technical Documents Niederhaus C, Barlow K, Griffin D, Miller F. "Medical Grade Water Generation for Intravenous Fluid Production on Exploration Missions." Washington, DC : National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 2008. NASA technical memorandum TM-2008-214999. https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/20080022376.pdf ; accessed 11/13/19. , May-2008
Project Title:  IntraVenous Fluid GENeration for Exploration Missions (IVGEN) Reduce
Fiscal Year: FY 2006 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP ExMC:Exploration Medical Capabilities
Start Date: 04/01/2006  
End Date: 08/31/2011  
Task Last Updated: 03/25/2009 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   McQuillen, John   / NASA Glenn Research Center 
Address:  21000 Brookpark Road 
77-5 
Cleveland , OH 44135 
Email: John.B.McQuillen@nasa.gov 
Phone: 216-433-2876  
Congressional District: 10 
Web:  
Organization Type: NASA CENTER 
Organization Name: NASA Glenn Research Center 
Joint Agency:  
Comments:  
Project Information: 
Responsible Center: NASA JSC 
Grant Monitor: Watkins, Sharmi1a  
Center Contact: 281.483.0395 
sharmila.watkins@nasa.gov 
Solicitation / Funding Source: Directed Research 
Project Type: FLIGHT 
Flight Program: ISS 
TechPort: Yes 
No. of Post Docs:  
No. of PhD Candidates:  
No. of Master's Candidates:  
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:  
No. of PhD Degrees:  
No. of Master's Degrees:  
No. of Bachelor's Degrees:  
Human Research Program Elements: (1) ExMC:Exploration Medical Capabilities
Human Research Program Risks: (1) ExMC:Risk of Unacceptable Health and Mission Outcomes Due to Limitations of In-flight Medical Capabilities (IRP Rev E)
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) ExMC 4.12:We do not have the capability to generate and utilize sterile intravenous fluid from potable water during exploration missions (IRP Rev E)
Flight Assignment/Project Notes: ISS

Task Description: IntraVenous Fluid GENeration for Exploration Missions (IVGEN) will demonstrate a microgravity compatible water purification to the standards required for intravenous administration, and a pharmaceutical mixing system. This hardware is a prototype that will allow flight surgeons more options to treat ill or injured crewmembers during future long-duration exploration missions.

See also http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/science/experiments/IVGEN.html

Research Impact/Earth Benefits: IVGEN technology could be used on Earth to generate IV fluid in Third World countries where medical resources are limited.

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2006 
Task Progress: New project in FY2006.

[Ed. note: Task added to Task Book in February 2009 when received information from JSC.]

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 09/07/2020) 

Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
 None in FY 2006