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Project Title:  Spaceflight Effects on Neurocognitive Performance: Extent, Longevity, and Neural Bases--80NSSC17K0461 Reduce
Images: icon  Fiscal Year: FY 2021 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Start Date: 07/14/2017  
End Date: 09/30/2022  
Task Last Updated: 05/12/2021 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Seidler, Rachael D. Ph.D. / University of Florida 
Address:  Applied Physiology & Kinesiology 
FLG 142, P.O. Box 118205 
Gainesville , FL 32611-8205 
Email: rachaelseidler@ufl.edu 
Phone: 352-294-1722  
Congressional District:
Web:  
Organization Type: UNIVERSITY 
Organization Name: University of Florida 
Joint Agency:  
Comments: NOTE: PI moved to University of Florida in July 2017; previous affiliation was University of Michigan.  
Co-Investigator(s)
Affiliation: 
Bloomberg, Jacob  Ph.D. NASA Johnson Space Center 
Mulavara, Ajitkumar  Ph.D. Universities Space Research Association 
Wood, Scott  Ph.D. NASA Johnson Space Center 
Key Personnel Changes / Previous PI: May 2021 report: Scott Wood, Ph.D., is now CoInvestigator on the project for his subject matter expertise.
Project Information: Grant/Contract No. 80NSSC17K0461 
Responsible Center: NASA JSC 
Grant Monitor: Stenger, Michael  
Center Contact: 281-483-1311 
michael.b.stenger@nasa.gov 
Solicitation / Funding Source: 2010 Crew Health NNJ10ZSA003N 
Grant/Contract No.: 80NSSC17K0461 
Project Type: FLIGHT,GROUND 
Flight Program:  
TechPort: No 
No. of Post Docs:
No. of PhD Candidates:
No. of Master's Candidates:  
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:  
No. of PhD Degrees:  
No. of Master's Degrees:
No. of Bachelor's Degrees:  
Human Research Program Elements: (1) HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Human Research Program Risks: (1) HSIA:Risk of Adverse Outcome Due to Inadequate Human Systems Integration Architecture (IRP Rev L)
(2) Sensorimotor:Risk of Altered Sensorimotor/Vestibular Function Impacting Critical Mission Tasks (Revised as of IRP Rev M)
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) HSIA-201:We need to evaluate the demands of future exploration habitat/vehicle systems and mission scenarios (e.g. increased automation, multi-modal communication) on individuals and teams, and determine the risks these demands pose to crew health and performance (IRP Rev L)
(2) HSIA-401:We need to determine how HSI can be applied in the vehicle/habitat and computer interface Design Phase to mitigate potential decrements in operationally-relevant performance (e.g. problem-solving, execution procedures), during increasingly earth-independent, future exploration missions (including in-mission and at landing) (IRP Rev L)
(3) SM-104:Evaluate how weightlessness-induced changes in sensorimotor/vestibular function relate to and/or interact with changes in other brain functions (sleep, cognition, attention) (IRP Rev M)
Flight Assignment/Project Notes: NOTE: End date changed to 9/30/2022 per NSSC information (Ed., 2/5/22)

NOTE: End date changed to 9/30/2021 per D. Risin/HRP and NSSC information (Ed., 8/27/20)

NOTE: Changed end date to 9/30/2020 per NSSC information (Ed., 10/9/19)

Task Description: NOTE: Continuation of "Spaceflight Effects on Neurocognitive Performance: Extent, Longevity, and Neural Bases," grant NNX11AR02G, due to Principal Investigator Seidler's move to University of Florida from University of Michigan.

NASA Research Announcement (NRA) NNJ10ZSA003N requested proposals to assess changes in elemental neurocognitive functions such as perception, motor control, memory, attention, language, executive function, and emotional processing following long duration spaceflight using both behavioral assessments and monitoring technologies such as fMRI. In response to this call, we propose to perform structural and functional MR brain imaging to identify the relationship between changes in crewmember neurocognitive function and neural structural alterations following a six month International Space Station mission. Our central hypothesis is that measures of brain structure, function, and network integrity will change from pre to post flight in crewmembers (Aim 1). Moreover, we predict that these changes will correlate with indices of cognitive, sensory, and motor function in a neuroanatomically selective fashion (Aim 2). Our interdisciplinary approach utilizes cutting edge neuroimaging techniques and a broad ranging battery of sensory, motor, and cognitive assessments that will be conducted pre flight, during flight, and post flight to investigate neuroplastic and maladaptive brain changes in crewmembers following long duration spaceflight. Success in this endeavor would 1) result in identification of the underlying neural mechanisms and operational risks of spaceflight-induced changes in behavior, and 2) identify whether a return to normative behavioral function following re-adaptation to Earth’s gravitational environment is associated with a restitution of brain structure and function or instead is supported by substitution with compensatory brain processes.

Research Impact/Earth Benefits: The results of this project will have relevance not only to understanding the effects of spaceflight on the human brain and behavior, but also for delineating the capacity of the brain to remodel in response to adaptive stimuli. As such, the results should prove informative for understanding the neural mechanisms associated with adaptive behavioral change and the rehabilitation of these changes during recovery periods.

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2021 
Task Progress: NRA NNJ10ZSA003N requested proposals to assess changes in elemental neurocognitive functions such as perception, motor control, memory, attention, language, executive function, and emotional processing following long duration spaceflight using both behavioral assessments and monitoring technologies such as fMRI. In response to this call, we proposed to perform structural and functional MR brain imaging to identify the relationship between changes in crewmember neurocognitive function and neural structural alterations following a six month International Space Station mission. Our central hypothesis was that measures of brain structure, function, and network integrity would change from pre to post flight in crewmembers (Aim 1). Moreover, we predicted that these changes would correlate with indices of cognitive, sensory, and motor function in a neuroanatomically selective fashion (Aim 2). Our interdisciplinary approach utilizes cutting edge neuroimaging techniques and a broad range of sensory, motor, and cognitive assessments that were conducted pre flight, during flight, and post flight to investigate neuroplastic and maladaptive brain changes in crewmembers following long duration spaceflight. Success in this endeavor would 1) result in identification of the underlying neural mechanisms and operational risks of spaceflight-induced changes in behavior, and 2) identify whether a return to normative behavioral function following re-adaptation to Earth’s gravitational environment is associated with a restitution of brain structure and function or, instead, is supported by substitution with compensatory brain processes.

We completed our data collection for this project in 2020 and have data analyses ongoing. We have published a few preliminary papers, including one showing that spaceflight is associated with an upward shift of the brain within the skull, and another focusing on fluid shifts in the brain with spaceflight. In a recent study, we showed that one year in space resulted in more brain changes than six months.

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 05/07/2022) 

Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
Articles in Peer-reviewed Journals Hupfeld KE, McGregor HR, Reuter-Lorenz PA, Seidler RD. "Microgravity effects on the human brain and behavior: dysfunction and adaptive plasticity." Neurosci Biobehav Rev. 2021 Mar;122:176-89. Review. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2020.11.017 ; PMID: 33454290 , Mar-2021
Articles in Peer-reviewed Journals Noohi F, Kinnaird C, De Dios Y, Kofman IS, Wood SJ, Bloomberg J, Mulavara A, Sienko KH, Polk TA, Seidler RD. "Age differences in vestibular brain connectivity are associated with balance performance." Front Aging Neurosci. 2020 Nov 16;12:566331. https://doi.org/10.3389/fnagi.2020.566331 ; PMID: 33312123; PMCID: PMC7703342 , Nov-2020
Articles in Peer-reviewed Journals Roberts DR, Stahn AC, Seidler RD, Wuyts FL. "Towards understanding the effects of spaceflight on the brain." Lancet Neurol. 2020 Oct 1;19(10):P808. Letter. https://doi.org/10.1016/S1474-4422(20)30304-5 ; PMID: 32949538 , Oct-2020
Articles in Peer-reviewed Journals Hupfeld KE, McGregor HR, Lee JK, Beltran NE, Kofman IS, De Dios YE, Reuter-Lorenz PA, Riascos RF, Pasternak O, Wood SJ, Bloomberg JJ, Mulavara AP, Seidler RD; Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. "The impact of six and twelve months in space on human brain structure and intracranial fluid shifts." Cereb Cortex Commun. 2020;1(1):tgaa023. https://doi.org/10.1093/texcom/tgaa023 ; PMID: 32864615; PMCID: PMC7446230, , Jun-2020
Project Title:  Spaceflight Effects on Neurocognitive Performance: Extent, Longevity, and Neural Bases--80NSSC17K0461 Reduce
Images: icon  Fiscal Year: FY 2020 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Start Date: 07/14/2017  
End Date: 09/30/2021  
Task Last Updated: 05/18/2020 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Seidler, Rachael D. Ph.D. / University of Florida 
Address:  Applied Physiology & Kinesiology 
FLG 142, P.O. Box 118205 
Gainesville , FL 32611-8205 
Email: rachaelseidler@ufl.edu 
Phone: 352-294-1722  
Congressional District:
Web:  
Organization Type: UNIVERSITY 
Organization Name: University of Florida 
Joint Agency:  
Comments: NOTE: PI moved to University of Florida in July 2017; previous affiliation was University of Michigan.  
Co-Investigator(s)
Affiliation: 
Bloomberg, Jacob  Ph.D. NASA Johnson Space Center 
Mulavara, Ajitkumar  Ph.D. Universities Space Research Association 
Project Information: Grant/Contract No. 80NSSC17K0461 
Responsible Center: NASA JSC 
Grant Monitor: Norsk, Peter  
Center Contact:  
Peter.norsk@nasa.gov 
Solicitation / Funding Source: 2010 Crew Health NNJ10ZSA003N 
Grant/Contract No.: 80NSSC17K0461 
Project Type: FLIGHT,GROUND 
Flight Program:  
TechPort: No 
No. of Post Docs:
No. of PhD Candidates:
No. of Master's Candidates:  
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:  
No. of PhD Degrees:  
No. of Master's Degrees:  
No. of Bachelor's Degrees:  
Human Research Program Elements: (1) HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Human Research Program Risks: (1) HSIA:Risk of Adverse Outcome Due to Inadequate Human Systems Integration Architecture (IRP Rev L)
(2) Sensorimotor:Risk of Altered Sensorimotor/Vestibular Function Impacting Critical Mission Tasks (Revised as of IRP Rev M)
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) HSIA-201:We need to evaluate the demands of future exploration habitat/vehicle systems and mission scenarios (e.g. increased automation, multi-modal communication) on individuals and teams, and determine the risks these demands pose to crew health and performance (IRP Rev L)
(2) HSIA-401:We need to determine how HSI can be applied in the vehicle/habitat and computer interface Design Phase to mitigate potential decrements in operationally-relevant performance (e.g. problem-solving, execution procedures), during increasingly earth-independent, future exploration missions (including in-mission and at landing) (IRP Rev L)
(3) SM-104:Evaluate how weightlessness-induced changes in sensorimotor/vestibular function relate to and/or interact with changes in other brain functions (sleep, cognition, attention) (IRP Rev M)
Flight Assignment/Project Notes: NOTE: End date changed to 9/30/2021 per D. Risin/HRP and NSSC information (Ed., 8/27/20)

NOTE: Changed end date to 9/30/2020 per NSSC information (Ed., 10/9/19)

Task Description: NOTE: Continuation of "Spaceflight Effects on Neurocognitive Performance: Extent, Longevity, and Neural Bases," grant NNX11AR02G, due to Principal Investigator Seidler's move to University of Florida from University of Michigan.

NASA Research Announcement NNJ10ZSA003N requested proposals to assess changes in elemental neurocognitive functions such as perception, motor control, memory, attention, language, executive function, and emotional processing following long duration spaceflight using both behavioral assessments and monitoring technologies such as fMRI. In response to this call, we propose to perform structural and functional MR brain imaging to identify the relationship between changes in crewmember neurocognitive function and neural structural alterations following a six month International Space Station mission. Our central hypothesis is that measures of brain structure, function, and network integrity will change from pre to post flight in crewmembers (Aim 1). Moreover, we predict that these changes will correlate with indices of cognitive, sensory, and motor function in a neuroanatomically selective fashion (Aim 2). Our interdisciplinary approach utilizes cutting edge neuroimaging techniques and a broad ranging battery of sensory, motor, and cognitive assessments that will be conducted pre flight, during flight, and post flight to investigate neuroplastic and maladaptive brain changes in crewmembers following long duration spaceflight. Success in this endeavor would 1) result in identification of the underlying neural mechanisms and operational risks of spaceflight-induced changes in behavior, and 2) identify whether a return to normative behavioral function following re-adaptation to Earth’s gravitational environment is associated with a restitution of brain structure and function or instead is supported by substitution with compensatory brain processes.

Research Impact/Earth Benefits: The results of this project will have relevance not only to understanding the effects of spaceflight on the human brain and behavior, but also for delineating the capacity of the brain to remodel in response to adaptive stimuli. As such, the results should prove informative for understanding the neural mechanisms associated with adaptive behavioral change and the rehabilitation of these changes during recovery periods.

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2020 
Task Progress: NRA NNJ10ZSA003N requested proposals to assess changes in elemental neurocognitive functions such as perception, motor control, memory, attention, language, executive function, and emotional processing following long duration spaceflight using both behavioral assessments and monitoring technologies such as fMRI. In response to this call, we propose to perform structural and functional MR brain imaging to identify the relationship between changes in crewmember neurocognitive function and neural structural alterations following a six month International Space Station mission. Our central hypothesis is that measures of brain structure, function, and network integrity will change from pre to post flight in crewmembers (Aim 1). Moreover, we predict that these changes will correlate with indices of cognitive, sensory, and motor function in a neuroanatomically selective fashion (Aim 2). Our interdisciplinary approach utilizes cutting edge neuroimaging techniques and a broad range of sensory, motor, and cognitive assessments that will be conducted pre flight, during flight, and post flight to investigate neuroplastic and maladaptive brain changes in crewmembers following long duration spaceflight. Success in this endeavor would 1) result in identification of the underlying neural mechanisms and operational risks of spaceflight-induced changes in behavior, and 2) identify whether a return to normative behavioral function following re-adaptation to Earth’s gravitational environment is associated with a restitution of brain structure and function or, instead, is supported by substitution with compensatory brain processes.

We have just completed data collection for this project in May 2020, including collection of multiple types of structural and functional brain MRIs. We have also collected performance on a battery of neuropsychological tests of working memory, processing speed, and motor function, as well as assessments of balance and mobility. Data analyses and manuscript preparation are underway.

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 05/07/2022) 

Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
 None in FY 2020
Project Title:  Spaceflight Effects on Neurocognitive Performance: Extent, Longevity, and Neural Bases--80NSSC17K0461 Reduce
Images: icon  Fiscal Year: FY 2019 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Start Date: 07/14/2017  
End Date: 09/30/2020  
Task Last Updated: 05/16/2019 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Seidler, Rachael D. Ph.D. / University of Florida 
Address:  Applied Physiology & Kinesiology 
FLG 142, P.O. Box 118205 
Gainesville , FL 32611-8205 
Email: rachaelseidler@ufl.edu 
Phone: 352-294-1722  
Congressional District:
Web:  
Organization Type: UNIVERSITY 
Organization Name: University of Florida 
Joint Agency:  
Comments: NOTE: PI moved to University of Florida in July 2017; previous affiliation was University of Michigan.  
Co-Investigator(s)
Affiliation: 
Bloomberg, Jacob  Ph.D. NASA Johnson Space Center 
Mulavara, Ajitkumar  Ph.D. Universities Space Research Association 
Project Information: Grant/Contract No. 80NSSC17K0461 
Responsible Center: NASA JSC 
Grant Monitor: McFather, Jon  
Center Contact:  
jon.c.mcfather@nasa.gov 
Solicitation / Funding Source: 2010 Crew Health NNJ10ZSA003N 
Grant/Contract No.: 80NSSC17K0461 
Project Type: FLIGHT,GROUND 
Flight Program:  
TechPort: No 
No. of Post Docs:
No. of PhD Candidates:
No. of Master's Candidates:  
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:  
No. of PhD Degrees:  
No. of Master's Degrees:  
No. of Bachelor's Degrees:  
Human Research Program Elements: (1) HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Human Research Program Risks: (1) HSIA:Risk of Adverse Outcome Due to Inadequate Human Systems Integration Architecture (IRP Rev L)
(2) Sensorimotor:Risk of Altered Sensorimotor/Vestibular Function Impacting Critical Mission Tasks (Revised as of IRP Rev M)
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) HSIA-201:We need to evaluate the demands of future exploration habitat/vehicle systems and mission scenarios (e.g. increased automation, multi-modal communication) on individuals and teams, and determine the risks these demands pose to crew health and performance (IRP Rev L)
(2) HSIA-401:We need to determine how HSI can be applied in the vehicle/habitat and computer interface Design Phase to mitigate potential decrements in operationally-relevant performance (e.g. problem-solving, execution procedures), during increasingly earth-independent, future exploration missions (including in-mission and at landing) (IRP Rev L)
(3) SM-104:Evaluate how weightlessness-induced changes in sensorimotor/vestibular function relate to and/or interact with changes in other brain functions (sleep, cognition, attention) (IRP Rev M)
Flight Assignment/Project Notes: NOTE: Changed end date to 9/30/2020 per NSSC information (Ed., 10/9/19)

Task Description: NOTE: Continuation of "Spaceflight Effects on Neurocognitive Performance: Extent, Longevity, and Neural Bases," grant NNX11AR02G, due to Principal Investigator Seidler's move to University of Florida from University of Michigan.

NASA Research Announcement NNJ10ZSA003N requested proposals to assess changes in elemental neurocognitive functions such as perception, motor control, memory, attention, language, executive function, and emotional processing following long duration spaceflight using both behavioral assessments and monitoring technologies such as fMRI. In response to this call, we propose to perform structural and functional MR brain imaging to identify the relationship between changes in crewmember neurocognitive function and neural structural alterations following a six month International Space Station mission. Our central hypothesis is that measures of brain structure, function, and network integrity will change from pre to post flight in crewmembers (Aim 1). Moreover, we predict that these changes will correlate with indices of cognitive, sensory, and motor function in a neuroanatomically selective fashion (Aim 2). Our interdisciplinary approach utilizes cutting edge neuroimaging techniques and a broad ranging battery of sensory, motor, and cognitive assessments that will be conducted pre flight, during flight, and post flight to investigate neuroplastic and maladaptive brain changes in crewmembers following long duration spaceflight. Success in this endeavor would 1) result in identification of the underlying neural mechanisms and operational risks of spaceflight-induced changes in behavior, and 2) identify whether a return to normative behavioral function following re-adaptation to Earth’s gravitational environment is associated with a restitution of brain structure and function or instead is supported by substitution with compensatory brain processes.

Research Impact/Earth Benefits: The results of this project will have relevance not only to understanding the effects of spaceflight on the human brain and behavior, but also for delineating the capacity of the brain to remodel in response to adaptive stimuli. As such, the results should prove informative for understanding the neural mechanisms associated with adaptive behavioral change and the rehabilitation of these changes during recovery periods.

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2019 
Task Progress: We are completing the seventh year of this project. We have 15 participants in varying states of data collection (two were approximately one year flight subjects). Three of these fifteen are still undergoing data collection, with the final test sessions to occur in 2020. During the reporting period, we have a published a paper applying similar metrics to retrospectively acquired clinical MRI scans of astronauts (Lee et al., 2019 JAMA Neurology). We reported patterns of fluid distribution within the brain that reflect an upward shift of the brain within the skull. This results in less fluid around the top of the brain, and increased fluid in the lower portions. We also found changes in brain connection pathways that are involved in processing sensory information and controlling movement.

Preliminary analyses of our ongoing data further reveal that crewmembers are slower post flight on tests of bimanual coordination and mental rotation. These are not generalized slowing effects, as other measures showed no changes in speed. Moreover, accuracy was unchanged despite these slowing effects, supporting that the changes were not simply reflecting strategic speed-accuracy trade off effects.

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 05/07/2022) 

Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
Articles in Peer-reviewed Journals Lee JK, Koppelmans V, Riascos RF, Hasan KM, Pasternak O, Mulavara AP, Bloomberg JJ, Seidler RD. "Spaceflight-associated brain white matter microstrucural changes and intracranial fluid redistribution." JAMA Neurology. 2019 Apr;76(4):412-9. https://doi.org/10.1001/jamaneurol.2018.4882 ; PubMed PMID: 30673793 , Apr-2019
Articles in Peer-reviewed Journals Koppelmans V, Scott JM, Downs ME, Cassady KE, Yuan P, Pasternak O, Wood SJ, De Dios YE, Gadd NE, Kofman I, Riascos R, Reuter-Lorenz PA, Bloomberg JJ, Mulavara AP, Ploutz-Snyder LL, Seidler RD. "Exercise effects on bed rest-induced brain changes." PLoS One. 2018 Oct 11;13(10):e0205515. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0205515 ; PubMed PMID: 30308004; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC6181401 , Oct-2018
Project Title:  Spaceflight Effects on Neurocognitive Performance: Extent, Longevity, and Neural Bases--80NSSC17K0461 Reduce
Images: icon  Fiscal Year: FY 2018 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Start Date: 07/14/2017  
End Date: 07/13/2019  
Task Last Updated: 05/18/2018 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Seidler, Rachael D. Ph.D. / University of Florida 
Address:  Applied Physiology & Kinesiology 
FLG 142, P.O. Box 118205 
Gainesville , FL 32611-8205 
Email: rachaelseidler@ufl.edu 
Phone: 352-294-1722  
Congressional District:
Web:  
Organization Type: UNIVERSITY 
Organization Name: University of Florida 
Joint Agency:  
Comments: NOTE: PI moved to University of Florida in July 2017; previous affiliation was University of Michigan.  
Co-Investigator(s)
Affiliation: 
Bloomberg, Jacob  Ph.D. NASA Johnson Space Center 
Mulavara, Ajitkumar  Ph.D. Universities Space Research Association 
Project Information: Grant/Contract No. 80NSSC17K0461 
Responsible Center: NASA JSC 
Grant Monitor: Loerch, Linda  
Center Contact:  
linda.loerch-1@nasa.gov 
Solicitation / Funding Source: 2010 Crew Health NNJ10ZSA003N 
Grant/Contract No.: 80NSSC17K0461 
Project Type: FLIGHT,GROUND 
Flight Program:  
TechPort: No 
No. of Post Docs:
No. of PhD Candidates:
No. of Master's Candidates:  
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:  
No. of PhD Degrees:  
No. of Master's Degrees:  
No. of Bachelor's Degrees:  
Human Research Program Elements: (1) HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Human Research Program Risks: (1) HSIA:Risk of Adverse Outcome Due to Inadequate Human Systems Integration Architecture (IRP Rev L)
(2) Sensorimotor:Risk of Altered Sensorimotor/Vestibular Function Impacting Critical Mission Tasks (Revised as of IRP Rev M)
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) HSIA-201:We need to evaluate the demands of future exploration habitat/vehicle systems and mission scenarios (e.g. increased automation, multi-modal communication) on individuals and teams, and determine the risks these demands pose to crew health and performance (IRP Rev L)
(2) HSIA-401:We need to determine how HSI can be applied in the vehicle/habitat and computer interface Design Phase to mitigate potential decrements in operationally-relevant performance (e.g. problem-solving, execution procedures), during increasingly earth-independent, future exploration missions (including in-mission and at landing) (IRP Rev L)
(3) SM-104:Evaluate how weightlessness-induced changes in sensorimotor/vestibular function relate to and/or interact with changes in other brain functions (sleep, cognition, attention) (IRP Rev M)
Task Description: NOTE: Continuation of "Spaceflight Effects on Neurocognitive Performance: Extent, Longevity, and Neural Bases," grant NNX11AR02G, due to Principal Investigator Seidler's move to University of Florida from University of Michigan.

NRA NNJ10ZSA003N requested proposals to assess changes in elemental neurocognitive functions such as perception, motor control, memory, attention, language, executive function, and emotional processing following long duration spaceflight using both behavioral assessments and monitoring technologies such as fMRI. In response to this call, we propose to perform structural and functional MR brain imaging to identify the relationship between changes in crewmember neurocognitive function and neural structural alterations following a six month International Space Station mission. Our central hypothesis is that measures of brain structure, function, and network integrity will change from pre to post flight in crewmembers (Aim 1). Moreover, we predict that these changes will correlate with indices of cognitive, sensory, and motor function in a neuroanatomically selective fashion (Aim 2). Our interdisciplinary approach utilizes cutting edge neuroimaging techniques and a broad ranging battery of sensory, motor, and cognitive assessments that will be conducted pre flight, during flight, and post flight to investigate neuroplastic and maladaptive brain changes in crewmembers following long duration spaceflight. Success in this endeavor would 1) result in identification of the underlying neural mechanisms and operational risks of spaceflight-induced changes in behavior, and 2) identify whether a return to normative behavioral function following re-adaptation to Earth’s gravitational environment is associated with a restitution of brain structure and function or instead is supported by substitution with compensatory brain processes.

Research Impact/Earth Benefits: The results of this project will have relevance not only to understanding the effects of spaceflight on the human brain and behavior, but also for delineating the capacity of the brain to remodel in response to adaptive stimuli. As such, the results should prove informative for understanding the neural mechanisms associated with adaptive behavioral change and the rehabilitation of these changes during recovery periods.

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2018 
Task Progress: We have made substantial progress over the past year; at this point we are halfway through data collection with six crewmembers who have completed all testing timepoints, and several others in various stages of progress. We are also working with a retrospective diffusion weighted MRI data set obtained from the Lifetime Surveillance of Astronaut Health (LSAH) database. In light of the recent reports of microgravity-induced cephalad fluid shift and gray matter atrophy seen in astronauts, we applied a technique to estimate white matter metrics after correcting for free water contamination. This approach enabled the analysis of white matter tissue-specific alterations that are unrelated to fluid shift, occurring from pre- to post- spaceflight as well as regional shifts in free water (FW). These findings are currently under review for publication. Prospective longitudinal studies are required to evaluate the time course of recovery from these changes.

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 05/07/2022) 

Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
Articles in Peer-reviewed Journals Yuan P, Koppelmans V, Reuter-Lorenz P, De Dios Y, Gadd N, Riascos R, Kofman I, Bloomberg J, Mulavara A, Seidler RD. "Change of cortical foot activation following 70 days of head down bed rest." J Neurophysiol. 2018 Jun 1;119(6):2145-52. Epub 2018 Feb 28. https://doi.org/10.1152/jn.00693.2017 ; PubMed PMID: 29488843; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC6032127 , Jun-2018
Articles in Peer-reviewed Journals Cassady K, Ruitenberg M, Koppelmans V, Reuter-Lorenz P, De Dios Y, Gadd N, Wood S, Riascos Castenada R, Kofman I, Bloomberg J, Mulavara A, Seidler R. "Neural predictors of sensorimotor adaptation rate and savings." Hum Brain Mapp. 2018 Apr;39(4):1516-31. Epub 2017 Dec 23. https://doi.org/10.1002/hbm.23924 ; PubMed PMID: 29274105; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5847457 , Apr-2018
Articles in Peer-reviewed Journals Yuan P, Koppelmans V, Reuter-Lorenz P, De Dios Y, Gadd N, Wood S, Riascos R, Kofman I, Bloomberg J, Mulavara A, Seidler R. "Vestibular brain changes within 70 days of head down bed rest." Hum Brain Mapp. 2018 Jul;39(7):2753-63. Epub 2018 Mar 12. https://doi.org/10.1002/hbm.24037 ; PubMed PMID: 29528169 ; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC6033666 , Jul-2018
Project Title:  Spaceflight Effects on Neurocognitive Performance: Extent, Longevity, and Neural Bases--80NSSC17K0461 Reduce
Images: icon  Fiscal Year: FY 2017 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Start Date: 07/14/2017  
End Date: 07/13/2019  
Task Last Updated: 01/11/2018 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Seidler, Rachael D. Ph.D. / University of Florida 
Address:  Applied Physiology & Kinesiology 
FLG 142, P.O. Box 118205 
Gainesville , FL 32611-8205 
Email: rachaelseidler@ufl.edu 
Phone: 352-294-1722  
Congressional District:
Web:  
Organization Type: UNIVERSITY 
Organization Name: University of Florida 
Joint Agency:  
Comments: NOTE: PI moved to University of Florida in July 2017; previous affiliation was University of Michigan.  
Co-Investigator(s)
Affiliation: 
Bloomberg, Jacob  Ph.D. NASA Johnson Space Center 
Mulavara, Ajitkumar  Ph.D. Universities Space Research Association 
Project Information: Grant/Contract No. 80NSSC17K0461 
Responsible Center: NASA JSC 
Grant Monitor: Loerch, Linda  
Center Contact:  
linda.loerch-1@nasa.gov 
Solicitation / Funding Source: 2010 Crew Health NNJ10ZSA003N 
Grant/Contract No.: 80NSSC17K0461 
Project Type: FLIGHT,GROUND 
Flight Program:  
TechPort: No 
No. of Post Docs:  
No. of PhD Candidates:  
No. of Master's Candidates:  
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:  
No. of PhD Degrees:  
No. of Master's Degrees:  
No. of Bachelor's Degrees:  
Human Research Program Elements: (1) HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Human Research Program Risks: (1) HSIA:Risk of Adverse Outcome Due to Inadequate Human Systems Integration Architecture (IRP Rev L)
(2) Sensorimotor:Risk of Altered Sensorimotor/Vestibular Function Impacting Critical Mission Tasks (Revised as of IRP Rev M)
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) HSIA-201:We need to evaluate the demands of future exploration habitat/vehicle systems and mission scenarios (e.g. increased automation, multi-modal communication) on individuals and teams, and determine the risks these demands pose to crew health and performance (IRP Rev L)
(2) HSIA-401:We need to determine how HSI can be applied in the vehicle/habitat and computer interface Design Phase to mitigate potential decrements in operationally-relevant performance (e.g. problem-solving, execution procedures), during increasingly earth-independent, future exploration missions (including in-mission and at landing) (IRP Rev L)
(3) SM-104:Evaluate how weightlessness-induced changes in sensorimotor/vestibular function relate to and/or interact with changes in other brain functions (sleep, cognition, attention) (IRP Rev M)
Task Description: NOTE: Continuation of "Spaceflight Effects on Neurocognitive Performance: Extent, Longevity, and Neural Bases," grant NNX11AR02G, due to Principal Investigator Seidler's move to University of Florida from University of Michigan.

NRA NNJ10ZSA003N requested proposals to assess changes in elemental neurocognitive functions such as perception, motor control, memory, attention, language, executive function, and emotional processing following long duration spaceflight using both behavioral assessments and monitoring technologies such as fMRI. In response to this call, we propose to perform structural and functional MR brain imaging to identify the relationship between changes in crewmember neurocognitive function and neural structural alterations following a six month International Space Station mission. Our central hypothesis is that measures of brain structure, function, and network integrity will change from pre to post flight in crewmembers (Aim 1). Moreover, we predict that these changes will correlate with indices of cognitive, sensory, and motor function in a neuroanatomically selective fashion (Aim 2). Our interdisciplinary approach utilizes cutting edge neuroimaging techniques and a broad ranging battery of sensory, motor, and cognitive assessments that will be conducted pre flight, during flight, and post flight to investigate neuroplastic and maladaptive brain changes in crewmembers following long duration spaceflight. Success in this endeavor would 1) result in identification of the underlying neural mechanisms and operational risks of spaceflight-induced changes in behavior, and 2) identify whether a return to normative behavioral function following re-adaptation to Earth’s gravitational environment is associated with a restitution of brain structure and function or instead is supported by substitution with compensatory brain processes.

Research Impact/Earth Benefits: The results of this project will have relevance not only to understanding the effects of spaceflight on the human brain and behavior, but also for delineating the capacity of the brain to remodel in response to adaptive stimuli. As such, the results should prove informative for understanding the neural mechanisms associated with adaptive behavioral change and the rehabilitation of these changes during recovery periods.

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2017 
Task Progress: New project for FY2017.

NOTE: Continuation of "Spaceflight Effects on Neurocognitive Performance: Extent, Longevity, and Neural Bases," grant NNX11AR02G, due to Principal Investigator Seidler's move to University of Florida from University of Michigan.

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 05/07/2022) 

Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
 None in FY 2017