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Task Book: Biological & Physical Sciences Division and Human Research Program
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Project Title:  Evaluation of Compression Garments as Countermeasures to Orthostatic Intolerance Reduce
Fiscal Year: FY 2008 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Start Date: 03/01/2007  
End Date: 08/31/2008  
Task Last Updated: 09/12/2013 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Platts, Steven H. Ph.D. / NASA Johnson Space Center 
Address:  Cardiovascular Laboratory 
Biomedical Research and Environmental Sciences Division 
Houston , TX 77058 
Email: steven.platts-1@nasa.gov 
Phone: 281-483-8177  
Congressional District: 36 
Web:  
Organization Type: NASA CENTER 
Organization Name: NASA Johnson Space Center 
Joint Agency:  
Comments:  
Co-Investigator(s)
Affiliation: 
Stenger, Michael  Ph.D. Wyle Laboratories, Inc./NASA Johnson Space Center 
Martin, David  M.S. Wyle Laboratories, Inc./NASA Johnson Space Center 
Richardson, Letetia  Ph.D. Wyle Laboratories, Inc./NASA Johnson Space Center 
Project Information: Grant/Contract No. Directed Research 
Responsible Center: NASA JSC 
Grant Monitor: Villarreal, Jennifer  
Center Contact: 281-483-7306 
jennifer.v311larreal@nasa.gov 
Solicitation / Funding Source: Directed Research 
Grant/Contract No.: Directed Research 
Project Type: GROUND 
Flight Program:  
TechPort: Yes 
No. of Post Docs:  
No. of PhD Candidates:  
No. of Master's Candidates:  
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:  
No. of PhD Degrees:  
No. of Master's Degrees:  
No. of Bachelor's Degrees:  
Human Research Program Elements: (1) HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Human Research Program Risks: (1) OI:Risk of Orthostatic Intolerance during Re-Exposure to Gravity
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) CV03:Is orthostatic intolerance a potential hazard?
Task Description: Previous work in our laboratory demonstrated that the NASA Anti-Gravity Suit (AGS) and the Russian Kentavr compression garment were effective countermeasures to orthostatic intolerance in subjects whose plasma volume was reduced pharmacologically to a similar degree as experienced by astronauts. While these compression garments were effective in these conditions, two observations led to the evaluation of other compression garments/conditions. First, although the AGS and Kentavr appeared to be equally effective in the initial study, the level of compression provided by the two garments were very different. The Kentavr provided compression of ~30 mmHg but the AGS was inflated to a pressure of ~78 mmHg. Thus, one objective of this study was to determine whether the AGS could provide a similar level of protection as the Kentavr when the AGS was inflated to provide a similar level of compression (~26 mmHg). Second, astronauts have reported uncomfortable levels of abdominal compression while using the AGS, which may be particularly problematic after completing the pre-landing fluid loading protocol. Therefore, the second objective of this study was to determine the efficacy of a thigh-high compression garment, which might be more effective than either the AGS or the Kentavr because it provided a gradient compression to promote venous return. Both the AGS and Kentavr apply approximately the same level of compression across the entire length of the garment, but a commercially-available garment provides the highest pressure at the ankle, and the pressure decreases up the leg to the top of the thigh. Both garments were evaluated in normal healthy subjects who were hypovolemic due to the infusion of furosemide (Lasix), as has been previously used in our laboratory.

The specific aims of this study were:

1. Evaluate the effectiveness of thigh-high compression garments to prevent orthostatic intolerance in hypovolemic subjects.

2. Evaluate the effectiveness of the Anti-Gravity Suit (AGS) at 1 “click” (0.5 psi) to prevent orthostatic intolerance in hypovolemic subjects.

3. Compare the effectiveness of the two garments which provide similar average levels of compression across their respective lengths but provide different levels of coverage (thigh-high vs. abdomen-high).

Research Impact/Earth Benefits:

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2008 
Task Progress: Both the AGS and Kentavr apply approximately the same level of compression across the entire length of the garment, but a commercially-available garment provides the highest pressure at the ankle, and the pressure decreases up the leg to the top of the thigh. Both garments were evaluated in normal healthy subjects who were hypovolemic due to the infusion of furosemide (Lasix), as has been previously used in our laboratory.

Wearing the AGS inflated to 0.5 psi reduced the rate of prescynope in hypovolemic subjects during a 30-min 80° head-up tilt test compared to wearing no compression garments, while the thigh-high compression garments did not. However, the incidence of presyncope while wearing the AGS inflated to 0.5 psi was higher than while wearing the AGS inflated to 1.5 psi (33% vs. 0%). Differences in the level of protection despite similar average levels of compression provided by the two garments suggest that differences in the amount of coverage of the two garments (thigh-high compression garments vs. abdomen-high AGS) tested in this study is a key factor in the design of orthostatic intolerance countermeasure garments. Later designs of the next-generation garment that were tested in astronauts and bed rest subjects included abdominal compression.

[Ed. note 9/12/13: information from PI's Task Book Initial Entry Form, provided September 2013]

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 03/01/2018)  Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
 None in FY 2008
Project Title:  Evaluation of Compression Garments as Countermeasures to Orthostatic Intolerance Reduce
Fiscal Year: FY 2007 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Start Date: 03/01/2007  
End Date: 08/31/2008  
Task Last Updated: 09/12/2013 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Platts, Steven H. Ph.D. / NASA Johnson Space Center 
Address:  Cardiovascular Laboratory 
Biomedical Research and Environmental Sciences Division 
Houston , TX 77058 
Email: steven.platts-1@nasa.gov 
Phone: 281-483-8177  
Congressional District: 36 
Web:  
Organization Type: NASA CENTER 
Organization Name: NASA Johnson Space Center 
Joint Agency:  
Comments:  
Co-Investigator(s)
Affiliation: 
Stenger, Michael  Wyle Laboratories, Inc./NASA Johnson Space Center 
Martin, David  Wyle Laboratories, Inc./NASA Johnson Space Center 
Richardson, Letetia  Ph.D. Wyle Laboratories, Inc./NASA Johnson Space Center 
Project Information: Grant/Contract No. Directed Research 
Responsible Center: NASA JSC 
Grant Monitor: Villarreal, Jennifer  
Center Contact: 281-483-7306 
jennifer.v311larreal@nasa.gov 
Solicitation / Funding Source: Directed Research 
Grant/Contract No.: Directed Research 
Project Type: GROUND 
Flight Program:  
TechPort: Yes 
No. of Post Docs:  
No. of PhD Candidates:  
No. of Master's Candidates:  
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:  
No. of PhD Degrees:  
No. of Master's Degrees:  
No. of Bachelor's Degrees:  
Human Research Program Elements: (1) HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Human Research Program Risks: (1) OI:Risk of Orthostatic Intolerance during Re-Exposure to Gravity
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) CV03:Is orthostatic intolerance a potential hazard?
Task Description: Previous work in our laboratory demonstrated that the NASA Anti-Gravity Suit and the Russian Kentavr compression garment were effective countermeasures to orthostatic intolerance in subjects whose plasma volume was reduced pharmacologically to a similar degree as experienced by astronauts. While these compression garments were effective in these conditions, two observations led to the evaluation of other compression garments/conditions. First, although the AGS and Kentavr appeared to be equally effective in the initial study, the level of compression provided by the two garments were very different. The Kentavr provided compression of ~30 mmHg but the AGS was inflated to a pressure of ~78 mmHg. Thus, one objective of this study was to determine whether the AGS could provide a similar level of protection as the Kentavr when the AGS was inflated to provide a similar level of compression (~26 mmHg). Second, astronauts have reported uncomfortable levels of abdominal compression while using the AGS, which may be particularly problematic after completing the pre-landing fluid loading protocol. Therefore, the second objective of this study was to determine the efficacy of a thigh-high compression garment, which might be more effective than either the AGS or the Kentavr because it provided a gradient compression to promote venous return. Both the AGS and Kentavr apply approximately the same level of compression across the entire length of the garment, but a commercially-available garment provides the highest pressure at the ankle, and the pressure decreases up the leg to the top of the thigh. Both garments were evaluated in normal healthy subjects who were hypovolemic due to the infusion of furosemide (Lasix), as has been previously used in our laboratory.

The specific aims of this study were:

1. Evaluate the effectiveness of thigh-high compression garments to prevent orthostatic intolerance in hypovolemic subjects.

2. Evaluate the effectiveness of the Anti-Gravity Suit (AGS) at 1 “click” (0.5 psi) to prevent orthostatic intolerance in hypovolemic subjects.

3. Compare the effectiveness of the two garments which provide similar average levels of compression across their respective lengths but provide different levels of coverage (thigh-high vs. abdomen-high).

Research Impact/Earth Benefits: 0

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2007 
Task Progress: New project for FY2007.

[Ed. note 9/12/2013: added to Task Book when received information from HRP]

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 03/01/2018)  Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
 None in FY 2007