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Project Title:  Maximal Oxygen Uptake (VO2max) and Submaximal Estimates of VO2max Before, During and After Long Duration International Space Station Missions Reduce
Fiscal Year: FY 2013 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Start Date: 12/13/2007  
End Date: 05/15/2013  
Task Last Updated: 04/29/2013 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Moore, Alan  Ph.D. / NASA Johnson Space Center 
Address:  Code SK32/KRUG 
2101 NASA Road 1 
Houston , TX 77058 
Email: alan.d.moore@nasa.gov 
Phone: 281 483-3749  
Congressional District: 22 
Web:  
Organization Type: NASA CENTER 
Organization Name: NASA Johnson Space Center 
Joint Agency:  
Comments:  
Co-Investigator(s)
Affiliation: 
Feiveson, Alan  Johnson Space Center 
Lee, Stuart  Wyle Laboratories 
Platts, Steven  Johnson Space Center 
Evetts, Simon  European Astronaut Centre 
Ploutz-Snyder, Lori  Universities Space Research Assoiciation 
Key Personnel Changes / Previous PI: April 2013 report: One of the original Co-Is, Frank McCleary, accepted employment in another field and is no longer participating as an investigator. Lori Ploutz-Snyder was added to the investigative team.
Project Information: Grant/Contract No. Directed Research 
Responsible Center: NASA JSC 
Grant Monitor: Norsk, Peter  
Center Contact:  
Peter.norsk@nasa.gov 
Solicitation / Funding Source: Directed Research 
Grant/Contract No.: Directed Research 
Project Type: FLIGHT 
Flight Program: ISS 
TechPort: No 
No. of Post Docs:
No. of PhD Candidates:
No. of Master's Candidates:
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:
No. of PhD Degrees:
No. of Master's Degrees:
No. of Bachelor's Degrees:
Human Research Program Elements: (1) HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Human Research Program Risks: (1) Aerobic:Risk of Reduced Physical Performance Capabilities Due to Reduced Aerobic Capacity
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) CV02:What is VO2max in-flight and immediately post-flight?
Flight Assignment/Project Notes: ISS 19, 20

NOTE: end date changed to 05/15/2013 per HRP MTL dtd 11/11/11 (Ed., 11/18/11)

NOTE: change in start/end dates per JSC--now showing as 12/13/2007-12/17/2012 (previously 10/1/08-10/1/11)--2/2010

NOTE: Title change per JSC ; previous title: Evaluation of Maximal Oxygen Uptake (VO2max) During Long Duration International Space Station Missions (9/2009)

NOTE: Start/end dates changed per JSC (4/27/2009)

Task Description: Maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max, sometimes referred to as VO2peak)* is the standard measure of aerobic capacity and is directly related to the physical working capacity of an individual. Reduction in VO2max is commonly reported as a result of ground-based analogues of long duration spaceflight. Due to early concerns related to the safety of performing maximal exercise testing during or shortly after long duration flight, and until recently lack of a device to measure exercise VO2 on International Space Station (ISS), VO2max has never been directly measured over the course of or following long duration space flight. For operational purposes, for example, to assess crew member readiness to perform Extra Vehicular Activities during long missions, the heart rate (HR) response to submaximal exercise testing has been used to infer changes in aerobic capacity. Recent work by the investigators of this study has suggested that the validity of using the HR response to track changes in aerobic capacity during ISS flight is suspect, as a fundamental assumption underlying this technique (equivalence of preflight and in-flight submaximal VO2 per set exercise work rate), was demonstrated as questionable.

The specific aims of this research are:

1. To directly measure VO2max during and following long duration ISS missions.

2. To examine the current method of estimating VO2max change during and following ISS missions, establish if it can used to validly track actual measures of VO2max and, if indicated evaluate alternative methods of tracking changes in VO2max.

*- Exercise Physiology investigators will often refer to the maximum oxygen uptake value assessed in this study as “VO2peak” as repeated exercise tests are not used to verify the subject is truly at physiological maximum (not practical or even possible for certain time points of the study). For the purposes of this study and report, the investigators use the more familiar term “VO2max.”

Rationale for HRP Directed Research: This research is directed because it contains highly constrained research, which requires focused and constrained data gathering and analysis that is more appropriately obtained through a non-competitive proposal.

Research Impact/Earth Benefits: The application of the research findings of this investigation will be most relevant to space flight operations, addressing the questions of whether or not maximum testing will be required to accurately assess aerobic capacity during the course of long-duration missions and determining the time-course of VO2max changes during and following long-duration space flight. However, the findings of this research may also be applied to the clinical realm on Earth by quantifying the time-course of recovery of VO2max after long-term deconditioning. This would aide in the determination of how long rehabilitation would be required after extended periods of bed rest confinement or other severe deconditioning.

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2013 
Task Progress: The VO2max study team finished data collection following ISS Expedition 32/33, which returned to Earth in mid-November of 2012. In all, 14 astronaut subjects participated as subjects for the VO2max study.

Data reduction and analysis has been ongoing. A draft of an internal NASA report, outlining the primary findings of the study, has been submitted to the management of the Exercise Physiology and Countermeasures project at NASA-JSC. This report is also a preliminary draft of the final report due next month to the Human Research Program. The investigators are in the process of preparing manuscripts of the study findings that will be submitted to peer-reviewed scientific journals over the next few months.

The general findings of the study are:

1) Long duration ISS crewmembers typically experience a decline in peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) which is evident within the first month of flight. VO2peak tends to slowly increase from the initially reduced levels during flight; however, the group data suggests that that VO2peak does not return to preflight levels. We speculate that the initial decrease in VO2peak is related to decreases in blood/plasma volume early in flight, and the upward trend following the initial decline is related to performance of in-flight exercise countermeasures. Immediately following flight, VO2peak is lower that preflight values, but recovers in the month following return to earth. The investigators note that there is a substantial amount of variation between subjects, with at least three subjects demonstrating no change during flight, however, the group data generally follows the description above.

2) The study data indicates that the method of using the heart rate (HR) response to submaximal exercise testing to track changes in VO2peak oftentimes conveys an erroneous impression of aerobic capacity, particularly when applied to an individual’s test results. This study objective was of particular interest to NASA Medical Operations because, although it generally recognized that maximal testing should provide the most accurate assessment of VO2peak, regular exercise tests being performed to maximal levels on ISS is undesirable for several reasons. These include the necessity of real-time ECG monitoring and down-link during maximal exercise tests conducted on ISS, which leads to resource constraints (both time and band-width constraints).

Using the submaximal exercise data collected during the VO2max study tests, estimates of VO2peak are calculated using the HR data and assuming the VO2 for each of the submaximal stages are similar those measured preflight [this is the method currently used for NASA Medical Operations]. The estimates of VO2max derived from this technique have varied from actual measurements of VO2max by as much as 40%. When actual measurements of submaximal oxygen uptake obtained during flight are substituted in the method described above, instead of assuming equivalence to preflight submaximal VO2 data, there is less variation from measured VO2peak but still the amount of variability seems inappropriately high to find utility as a method to accurately assess crew aerobic fitness.

3) The data obtained for ancillary physiologic measurements collected during the exercise tests (e.g. the non-invasive cardiac output measurements) are in the process of being statistically examined to determine if they have utility in developing a more accurate submaximal estimate of VO2peak.

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 03/03/2016)  Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
Abstracts for Journals and Proceedings Moore AD Jr, Evetts SN, Feiveson AH, Lee SMC, Ploutz-Snyder L. "Peak oxygen uptake during and after long-duration spaceflight." 2013 NASA Human Research Program Investigators’ Workshop, Galveston, TX, February 12-14, 2013.

2013 NASA Human Research Program Investigators’ Workshop, Galveston, TX, February 12-14, 2013. , Feb-2013

Articles in Peer-reviewed Journals Moore AD, Downs ME, Lee SM, Feiveson AH, Knudsen P, Ploutz-Snyder LL. "Peak exercise oxygen uptake during and following long-duration spaceflight." J Appl Physiol (1985). 2014 Jun 26. [Epub ahead of print] http://dx.doi.org/10.1152/japplphysiol.01251.2013 ; PubMed PMID: 24970852 , Jun-2014
Project Title:  Maximal Oxygen Uptake (VO2max) and Submaximal Estimates of VO2max Before, During and After Long Duration International Space Station Missions Reduce
Fiscal Year: FY 2011 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Start Date: 12/13/2007  
End Date: 05/15/2013  
Task Last Updated: 03/09/2011 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Moore, Alan  Ph.D. / NASA Johnson Space Center 
Address:  Code SK32/KRUG 
2101 NASA Road 1 
Houston , TX 77058 
Email: alan.d.moore@nasa.gov 
Phone: 281 483-3749  
Congressional District: 22 
Web:  
Organization Type: NASA CENTER 
Organization Name: NASA Johnson Space Center 
Joint Agency:  
Comments:  
Co-Investigator(s)
Affiliation: 
Feiveson, Alan  Johnson Space Center 
Lee, Stuart  Wyle Laboratories 
McCleary, Frank  Wyle Laboratories 
Platts, Steven  Johnson Space Center 
Evetts, Simon  European Astronaut Centre 
Project Information: Grant/Contract No. Directed Research 
Responsible Center: NASA JSC 
Grant Monitor: Norsk, Peter  
Center Contact:  
Peter.norsk@nasa.gov 
Solicitation / Funding Source: Directed Research 
Grant/Contract No.: Directed Research 
Project Type: FLIGHT 
Flight Program: ISS 
TechPort: No 
No. of Post Docs:
No. of PhD Candidates:
No. of Master's Candidates:
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:
No. of PhD Degrees:
No. of Master's Degrees:
No. of Bachelor's Degrees:
Human Research Program Elements: (1) HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Human Research Program Risks: (1) Aerobic:Risk of Reduced Physical Performance Capabilities Due to Reduced Aerobic Capacity
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) CV02:What is VO2max in-flight and immediately post-flight?
Flight Assignment/Project Notes: ISS 19, 20

NOTE: end date changed to 05/15/2013 per HRP MTL dtd 11/11/11 (Ed., 11/18/11)

NOTE: change in start/end dates per JSC--now showing as 12/13/2007-12/17/2012 (previously 10/1/08-10/1/11)--2/2010

NOTE: Title change per JSC ; previous title: Evaluation of Maximal Oxygen Uptake (VO2max) During Long Duration International Space Station Missions (9/2009)

NOTE: Start/end dates changed per JSC (4/27/2009)

Task Description: Maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max, sometimes referred to as VO2peak)* is the standard measure of aerobic capacity and is directly related to the physical working capacity of an individual. Reduction in VO2max is commonly reported as a result of ground-based analogues of long duration spaceflight. Due to early concerns related to the safety of performing maximal exercise testing during or shortly after long duration flight, and until recently lack of a device to measure exercise VO2 on International Space Station (ISS), VO2max has never been directly measured over the course of or following long duration space flight. For operational purposes, for example, to assess crew member readiness to perform Extra Vehicular Activities during long missions, the heart rate (HR) response to submaximal exercise testing have been used to infer changes in aerobic capacity. Recent work by the investigators of this study has suggested that the validity of using the HR response to track changes in aerobic capacity during ISS flight is suspect, as a fundamental assumption underlying this technique (equivalence of preflight and in-flight submaximal VO2 per set exercise work rate), was demonstrated as questionable.

The specific aims of this research are:

1. To directly measure VO2max during and following long duration ISS missions.

2. To examine the current method of estimating VO2max change during and following ISS missions, and establish if it can used to validly track actual measures of VO2max.

3. To determine if the addition of a non-invasive cardiac output measures during exercise will improve the accuracy of estimating changes in VO2max during and following ISS missions.

*- Exercise Physiology investigators will often refer to the maximum oxygen uptake value assessed in this study as “VO2peak” as repeated exercise tests are not used to verify the subject is truly at physiological maximum (not practical or even possible for certain time points of the study). For the purposes of this study and report, the investigators use the more familiar term “VO2max.”

Rationale for HRP Directed Research: This research is directed because it contains highly constrained research, which requires focused and constrained data gathering and analysis that is more appropriately obtained through a non-competitive proposal.

Research Impact/Earth Benefits: The application of the research findings of this investigation will be most relevant to space flight operations, addressing the questions of whether or not maximum testing will be required to accurately assess aerobic capacity during the course of long-duration missions and determining the time-course of VO2max changes during and following long-duration space flight. However, the findings of this research may also be applied to the clinical realm on Earth by quantifying the time-course of recovery of VO2max after long-term deconditioning. This would aide in the determination of how long rehabilitation would be required after extended periods of bed rest confinement or other severe deconditioning.

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2011 
Task Progress: Task Progress:

The VO2max study continues to progress well. Seven subjects have now completed the study on board ISS, with the eighth currently on board. In addition, informed consent has been obtained for the remaining subject complement.

An internal NASA Mid-Study Review was conducted for the management of the Human Research Program (HRP) and the Human Health Countermeasures Element (HHC) in February, 2011. This review recommended continuing the study for the full complement of subjects.

The general interim findings of the study are:

1) Long duration ISS crewmembers typically experience a decline in VO2max which is evident within the first month of flight. VO2max tends to slowly increase from the initially reduced levels during flight; however, the group data suggests that that VO2max does not reach preflight levels. We speculate that the initial decrease in VO2max is related to decreases in blood/plasma volume early in flight, and the upward trend following the initial decline is related to performance of in-flight exercise countermeasures. Immediately following flight, VO2max is lower that preflight values, but recovers in the month following return to earth. The investigators note that there is a substantial amount of variation between subjects, with at least one subject demonstrating no change during flight, however, the group data generally follows the description above.

2) We continue to examine the accuracy of estimating VO2max, and tracking changes in VO2max, using the heart rate (HR) response to submaximal exercise. This study objective is of particular interest to NASA Medical Operations because, although it generally recognized that maximal testing should provide the most accurate assessment of VO2max, regular exercise tests being performed to maximal levels on ISS is undesirable for several reasons. These include the necessity of real-time ECG monitoring and down-link during maximal exercise tests conducted on ISS, which leads to resource constraints (both time and band-width constraints).

Using the submaximal exercise data collected during the VO2max study tests, estimates of VO2max are calculated using the HR data and assuming the VO2 for each of the submaximal stages are similar those measured preflight [this is the method currently used for NASA Medical Operations]. The estimates of VO2max derived from this technique have varied from actual measurements of VO2max by as much as 28%. Thus, it is highly likely that we will conclude that this technique in not a desirable one for Medical Operations to continue to utilize.

We also perform a similar calculation using the measured VO2 values for submaximal exercise, instead of assuming equivalence to preflight values. The differences from actual measurements of VO2max are reduced, with the maximal difference being approximately 14%. Thus, there is increased precision in using this technique but it still may be too variable to recommend for accurate assessment of aerobic fitness.

3) Ancillary measurements taken during the exercise tests (e.g. the cardiac output measurements) have been obtained. Determination of their utility in developing a more accurate submaximal estimate of VO2max is ongoing.

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 03/03/2016)  Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
Abstracts for Journals and Proceedings Moore AD, Lee SMC, McCleary FA, Evetts SN, Feiveson AH. "Oxygen Consumption and Heart Rate Responses in Graded Exercise during Long-Duration Space Flight. " Presented at the 57th Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, Baltimore MD, June 1-5, 2010.

Med Sci Sport Exerc. 2010 May;42 (5 Suppl):515. http://dx.doi.org/10.1249/01.MSS.0000385173.96698.e6 , May-2010

Project Title:  Maximal Oxygen Uptake (VO2max) and Submaximal Estimates of VO2max Before, During and After Long Duration International Space Station Missions Reduce
Fiscal Year: FY 2010 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Start Date: 12/13/2007  
End Date: 12/17/2012  
Task Last Updated: 05/21/2010 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Moore, Alan  Ph.D. / NASA Johnson Space Center 
Address:  Code SK32/KRUG 
2101 NASA Road 1 
Houston , TX 77058 
Email: alan.d.moore@nasa.gov 
Phone: 281 483-3749  
Congressional District: 22 
Web:  
Organization Type: NASA CENTER 
Organization Name: NASA Johnson Space Center 
Joint Agency:  
Comments:  
Co-Investigator(s)
Affiliation: 
Feiveson, Alan  Johnson Space Center 
Lee, Stuart  Wyle Laboratories 
McCleary, Frank  Wyle Laboratories 
Platts, Steven  Johnson Space Center 
Evetts, Simon  European Astronaut Centre 
Project Information: Grant/Contract No. Directed Research 
Responsible Center: NASA JSC 
Grant Monitor: Meck, J@n  
Center Contact: 281-244-5405 
janice.v.meck@nasa.gov 
Solicitation / Funding Source: Directed Research 
Grant/Contract No.: Directed Research 
Project Type: FLIGHT 
Flight Program: ISS 
TechPort: No 
No. of Post Docs:
No. of PhD Candidates:
No. of Master's Candidates:
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:
No. of PhD Degrees:
No. of Master's Degrees:
No. of Bachelor's Degrees:
Human Research Program Elements: (1) HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Human Research Program Risks: (1) Aerobic:Risk of Reduced Physical Performance Capabilities Due to Reduced Aerobic Capacity
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) CV02:What is VO2max in-flight and immediately post-flight?
Flight Assignment/Project Notes: ISS 19, 20

NOTE: change in start/end dates per JSC--now showing as 12/13/2007-12/17/2012 (previously 10/1/08-10/1/11)--2/2010

NOTE: Title change per JSC ; previous title: Evaluation of Maximal Oxygen Uptake (VO2max) During Long Duration International Space Station Missions (9/2009)

NOTE: Start/end dates changed per JSC (4/27/2009)

Task Description: Maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max, sometimes referred to as VO2peak)* is the standard measure of aerobic capacity and is directly related to the physical working capacity of an individual. Reduction in VO2max is commonly reported as a result of ground-based analogues of long duration spaceflight. Due to early concerns related to the safety of performing maximal exercise testing during or shortly after long duration flight, and until recently lack of a device to measure exercise VO2 on International Space Station (ISS), VO2max has never been directly measured over the course of or following long duration space flight. For operational purposes, for example, to assess crew member readiness to perform Extra Vehicular Activities during long missions, the heart rate (HR) response to submaximal exercise testing have been used to infer changes in aerobic capacity. Recent work by the investigators of this study has suggested that the validity of using the HR response to track changes in aerobic capacity during ISS flight is suspect, as a fundamental assumption underlying this technique (equivalence of preflight and in-flight submaximal VO2 per set exercise work rate), was demonstrated as questionable.

The specific aims of this research are:

1. To directly measure VO2max during and following long duration ISS missions.

2. To examine the current method of estimating VO2max change during and following ISS missions, and establish if it can used to validly track actual measures of VO2max.

3. To determine if the addition of a non-invasive cardiac output measures during exercise will improve the accuracy of estimating changes in VO2max during and following ISS missions.

*- Exercise Physiology investigators will often refer to the maximum oxygen uptake value assessed in this study as “VO2peak” as repeated exercise tests are not used to verify the subject is truly at physiological maximum (not practical or even possible for certain time points of the study). For the purposes of this study and report, the investigators use the more familiar term “VO2max.”

Rationale for HRP Directed Research: This research is directed because it contains highly constrained research, which requires focused and constrained data gathering and analysis that is more appropriately obtained through a non-competitive proposal.

Research Impact/Earth Benefits: The application of the research findings of this investigation will be most relevant to space flight operations, addressing the questions of whether or not maximum testing will be required to accurately assess aerobic capacity during the course of long-duration missions and determining the time-course of VO2max changes during and following long-duration space flight. However, the findings of this research may also be applied to the clinical realm on Earth by quantifying the time-course of recovery of VO2max after long-term deconditioning. This would aide in the determination of how long rehabilitation would be required after extended periods of bed rest confinement or other severe deconditioning.

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2010 
Task Progress: Progress on the VO2max study has been excellent in its first year of conduct. The VO2max study serves as an exemplary model of an international collaborative effort in support of research on the ISS. The device used to measure VO2 and cardiac output, the European Space Agency (ESA) provided Portable Pulmonary Function System (PPFS; Damec, Odense, DK) was successfully validated during ground trials. The PPFS was launched to ISS on board the Japan Aerospace Agency (JAXA) H-II transfer vehicle in September, 2009. The first 4 ESA and NASA astronaut volunteers (of 12 planned) have completed the experiment. The fifth subject is currently on board ISS, with two additional participating astronauts due to launch in June, 2010. Minor problems have been encountered with equipment set-up and calibration prior to some of the in-flight test sessions, which lead to those sessions running slightly longer than planned, but troubleshooting by the crew members in coordination with the NASA and ESA ground support teams have been effective in resolving the issues and good data were successfully obtained. In addition, due to the arrival of the PPFS in the middle of the first expedition that the experiment was manifested on, the response of VO2max early in flight was not measured for the first three subjects.

It is too early in the study to draw any conclusions from the findings to date. However, some preliminary observations are offered here:

1. The VO2max responses of the subjects during flight have been variable, with 2 subjects demonstrating declines >20%, 1 subject having a more modest decline (~10%) and one subject remaining unchanged from preflight levels.

2. There are differences observed between the estimates of aerobic capacity derived by submaximal test data (calculated using either HR and work rate data, or HR and submaximal VO2 data) and measured VO2max. The magnitude of this difference has been inconsistent when compared across subjects.

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 03/03/2016)  Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
Abstracts for Journals and Proceedings Moore AD, Evetts SN, Feiveson AH, Lee SMC, McCleary FA, Platts SH. "Maximum oxygen uptake during and after long-duration space flight." Presented at the 2010 NASA Human Research Program Investigators' Workshop, Houston, TX, February 3-5, 2010.

2010 NASA Human Research Program Investigators' Workshop, 2010. Published online and available at: http://www.dsls.usra.edu/meetings/hrp2010/pdf/Muscle/1148AMoore.pdf , Feb-2010

Articles in Peer-reviewed Journals Moore AD, Lee SMC, Stenger MB, Platts SH. "Cardiovascular exercise in the U.S. space program: Past, present and future." Acta Astronautica. 2010 Apr-May;66(7-8):974-88. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.actaastro.2009.10.009 , Apr-2010
Project Title:  Maximal Oxygen Uptake (VO2max) and Submaximal Estimates of VO2max Before, During and After Long Duration International Space Station Missions Reduce
Fiscal Year: FY 2008 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Start Date: 12/13/2007  
End Date: 12/17/2012  
Task Last Updated: 02/26/2009 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Moore, Alan  Ph.D. / NASA Johnson Space Center 
Address:  Code SK32/KRUG 
2101 NASA Road 1 
Houston , TX 77058 
Email: alan.d.moore@nasa.gov 
Phone: 281 483-3749  
Congressional District: 22 
Web:  
Organization Type: NASA CENTER 
Organization Name: NASA Johnson Space Center 
Joint Agency:  
Comments:  
Co-Investigator(s)
Affiliation: 
Feiveson, Alan  Johnson Space Center 
Lee, Stuart  Wyle Laboratories 
McCleary, Frank  Wyle Laboratories 
Platts, Steven  Johnson Space Center 
Evetts, Simon  European Astronaut Centre 
Project Information: Grant/Contract No. Directed Research 
Responsible Center: NASA JSC 
Grant Monitor: Meck, J@n  
Center Contact: 281-244-5405 
janice.v.meck@nasa.gov 
Solicitation / Funding Source: Directed Research 
Grant/Contract No.: Directed Research 
Project Type: FLIGHT 
Flight Program: ISS 
TechPort: No 
No. of Post Docs:  
No. of PhD Candidates:  
No. of Master's Candidates:  
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:  
No. of PhD Degrees:  
No. of Master's Degrees:  
No. of Bachelor's Degrees:  
Human Research Program Elements: (1) HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Human Research Program Risks: (1) Aerobic:Risk of Reduced Physical Performance Capabilities Due to Reduced Aerobic Capacity
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) CV02:What is VO2max in-flight and immediately post-flight?
Flight Assignment/Project Notes: ISS 19, 20

NOTE: change in start/end dates per JSC--now showing as 12/13/2007-12/17/2012 (previously 10/1/08-10/1/11)--2/2010

NOTE: Title change per JSC ; previous title: Evaluation of Maximal Oxygen Uptake (VO2max) During Long Duration International Space Station Missions (9/2009)

NOTE: Start/end dates changed per JSC (4/27/2009)

Task Description: Evaluation of Maximal Oxygen Uptake and Submaximal Estimates of VO2max Before, During, and After Long Duration International Space Station Missions (VO2max) will document changes in maximum oxygen uptake for crewmembers onboard the International Space Station (ISS) on long-duration missions, greater than 90 days. This investigation will establish the characteristics of VO2max during flight and assess the validity of the current methods of tracking aerobic capacity change during and following the ISS missions.

See also http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/science/experiments/VO2max.html

Rationale for HRP Directed Research: This research is directed because it contains highly constrained research, which requires focused and constrained data gathering and analysis that is more appropriately obtained through a non-competitive proposal.

Research Impact/Earth Benefits: Little information is currently available on the effects of long-term exposure to a closed life control system microgravity environment on aerobic capacity of humans. This information is important to maintain crew health during long-duration exploration. The data will also provide valuable insight into the aerobic capacity of teams in closed environments on Earth, such as arctic bases and submarines.

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2008 
Task Progress: New project for FY2008.

[Ed. note: added to Task Book in Feb 2009 when received information]

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 03/03/2016)  Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
 None in FY 2008