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Project Title:  Temperature Regulatory and Cardiovascular Responses to Exercise During Long-Duration Spaceflight Reduce
Fiscal Year: FY 2011 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Start Date: 05/01/2010  
End Date: 09/30/2011  
Task Last Updated: 10/12/2011 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Crandall, Craig Gerald Ph.D. / The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas 
Address:  IEEM-Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas 
7232 Greenville Ave 
Dallas , TX 75231-5129 
Email: craigcrandall@texashealth.org 
Phone: 214-345-4623  
Congressional District: 30 
Web:  
Organization Type: UNIVERSITY 
Organization Name: The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas 
Joint Agency:  
Comments:  
Co-Investigator(s)
Affiliation: 
Moore, Alan  NASA Johnson Space Center 
Levine, Benjamin  The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas 
Project Information: Grant/Contract No. NCC 9-58-CA02202 
Responsible Center: NSBRI 
Grant Monitor:  
Center Contact:   
Solicitation / Funding Source: 2009 Crew Health NNJ09ZSA002N 
Grant/Contract No.: NCC 9-58-CA02202 
Project Type: GROUND 
Flight Program:  
TechPort: No 
No. of Post Docs:
No. of PhD Candidates:
No. of Master's Candidates:
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:
No. of PhD Degrees:
No. of Master's Degrees:
No. of Bachelor's Degrees:
Human Research Program Elements: (1) HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Human Research Program Risks: None
Human Research Program Gaps: None
Flight Assignment/Project Notes: NOTE: End date changed to 9/30/2011 (from 4/30/2014) as project was descoped, per NSBRI (Ed., 10/11/2011)

Task Description: Appropriate temperature regulation is critical for the safety of astronauts performing physically demanding work, particularly that which occurs during extravehicular activities. Work performance is also greatly reduced if impaired temperature regulation results in large elevations in internal temperatures. Using ground-based models of space flight, the prevailing data suggest that temperature control is impaired while astronauts are in space. However, it remains unknown whether these models accurately reflect physiological responses of space flight. Within this context, the proposed study will investigate two key questions: 1) Does space flight impair temperature regulation while astronauts are in a zero gravity environment; and 2) Does prolonged space flight impair temperature regulation during extravehicular activities that may occur in a partial gravity environment of a lunar (1/6 the Earth's gravity) or Mars (3/8 the Earth's gravity) mission? The first objective will be accomplished by evaluating temperature regulatory responses in astronauts during steady-state exercise prior to space flight, on a monthly basis while on the International Space Station, and upon return to Earth. The second objective will evaluate the effects of prolonged space flight on temperature regulatory responses during exercise that simulates an extravehicular activity in a Mars or lunar gravitational environment. For both objectives, the astronauts' temperature regulatory capacity will be evaluated by measuring internal temperature, skin blood flow, and sweat rate responses during the prescribed exercise conditions. The provided information will be extremely valuable to NASA as it will lead to improved safety and perhaps physical work capacity of the astronauts during the indicated exposures.

Key Findings: Project defunded prior to onset of data collection.

Research Impact/Earth Benefits: Project deselected prior to onset of data collection.

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2011 
Task Progress: Project deselected prior to onset of data collection.

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: ) 

Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
 None in FY 2011
Project Title:  Temperature Regulatory and Cardiovascular Responses to Exercise During Long-Duration Spaceflight Reduce
Fiscal Year: FY 2010 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Start Date: 05/01/2010  
End Date: 09/30/2011  
Task Last Updated: 06/21/2010 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Crandall, Craig Gerald Ph.D. / The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas 
Address:  IEEM-Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas 
7232 Greenville Ave 
Dallas , TX 75231-5129 
Email: craigcrandall@texashealth.org 
Phone: 214-345-4623  
Congressional District: 30 
Web:  
Organization Type: UNIVERSITY 
Organization Name: The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas 
Joint Agency:  
Comments:  
Co-Investigator(s)
Affiliation: 
Levine, Benjamin  The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas 
Moore, Alan  Wyle Laboratories, Inc. 
Project Information: Grant/Contract No. NCC 9-58-CA02202 
Responsible Center: NSBRI 
Grant Monitor:  
Center Contact:   
Solicitation / Funding Source: 2009 Crew Health NNJ09ZSA002N 
Grant/Contract No.: NCC 9-58-CA02202 
Project Type: GROUND 
Flight Program:  
TechPort: No 
No. of Post Docs:  
No. of PhD Candidates:  
No. of Master's Candidates:  
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:  
No. of PhD Degrees:  
No. of Master's Degrees:  
No. of Bachelor's Degrees:  
Human Research Program Elements: (1) HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Human Research Program Risks: None
Human Research Program Gaps: None
Flight Assignment/Project Notes: NOTE: End date changed to 9/30/2011 (from 4/30/2014) as project was descoped, per NSBRI (Ed., 10/11/2011)

Task Description: Appropriate temperature regulation is critical for the safety of astronauts performing physically demanding work, particularly that which occurs during extravehicular activities. Work performance is also greatly reduced if impaired temperature regulation results in large elevations in internal temperatures. Using ground-based models of spaceflight, the prevailing data suggest that temperature control is impaired while astronauts are in space. However, it remains unknown whether these models accurately reflect physiological responses of spaceflight.

Within this context, the project will investigate two key questions:

1) Does spaceflight impair temperature regulation while astronauts are in a zero-gravity environment; and

2) Does prolonged spaceflight impair temperature regulation during extravehicular activities that may occur in a partial-gravity environment of a lunar (one-sixth of the Earth's gravity) or Mars (three-eighths of the Earth's gravity) mission?

The first objective will be accomplished by evaluating temperature regulatory responses in astronauts during steady-state exercise prior to spaceflight, on a monthly basis while on the International Space Station and upon return to Earth. The second objective will evaluate the effects of prolonged spaceflight on temperature regulatory responses during exercise that simulates an extravehicular activity in a Mars or lunar gravitational environment. For both objectives, the astronauts' temperature regulatory capacity will be evaluated by measuring internal temperature, skin-blood flow and sweat-rate responses during the prescribed exercise conditions.

The information collected will be extremely valuable to NASA as it will lead to improved safety and perhaps to improve physical work capacity of astronauts during the indicated exposures.

Research Impact/Earth Benefits: 0

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2010 
Task Progress: New project for FY2010.

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: ) 

Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
 None in FY 2010