Menu

 

Task Book: Biological & Physical Sciences Division and Human Research Program
Advanced Search     

Project Title:  Characterization of Oxidative Damage During a Saturation Dive Reduce
Fiscal Year: FY 2010 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Start Date: 10/01/2008  
End Date: 09/30/2010  
Task Last Updated: 12/20/2010 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Smith, Scott M Ph.D. / NASA Johnson Space Center 
Address:  Biomedical Research and Environmental Sciences Division/SK3 
2101 NASA Pkwy 
Houston , TX 77058-3607 
Email: scott.m.smith@nasa.gov 
Phone: 281-483-7204  
Congressional District: 36 
Web:  
Organization Type: NASA CENTER 
Organization Name: NASA Johnson Space Center 
Joint Agency:  
Comments:  
Co-Investigator(s)
Affiliation: 
Zwart, Sara  USRA/NASA Johnson Space Center 
Jessup, J. Milburn  NIH/National Cancer Institute/Cancer Diagnosis Program 
Project Information: Grant/Contract No. Directed Research 
Responsible Center: NASA JSC 
Grant Monitor: Goodwin, Thomas  
Center Contact:  
thomas.j.goodwin@nasa.gov 
Solicitation / Funding Source: Directed Research 
Grant/Contract No.: Directed Research 
Project Type: GROUND 
Flight Program:  
TechPort: No 
No. of Post Docs:  
No. of PhD Candidates:  
No. of Master's Candidates:  
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:  
No. of PhD Degrees:  
No. of Master's Degrees:  
No. of Bachelor's Degrees:  
Human Research Program Elements: (1) HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Human Research Program Risks: (1) Nutrition:Risk of Inadequate Nutrition
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) N06:What impact does the spaceflight environment have on oxidative damage?
(2) N15:We need to identify the most important nutritional factors for oxidative damage during spaceflight (IRP Rev E)
Flight Assignment/Project Notes: NOTE: End date changed back to 9/30/2010 per discussions with PI (Ed., 2/8/2012)

NOTE: Change in end date to 5/20/2011 per HRP Master Task List information dtd 11/11/11 (Ed., 1/30/2012)

Task Description: It is well understood that living in an environment with an increased partial pressure of oxygen will result in oxidative damage to the body – this is supported by our published data from NEEMO (NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations) V, XII, and XIII saturation dive missions. Similar types of oxidative damage are evident after long-duration space flight. In this study, we propose to expand the number of markers of oxidative damage measured in the earlier NEEMO missions to better characterize observed effects, and to also include biomarkers suggested by the National Cancer Institute and other members of the NIH at a joint NCI/NASA workshop on oxidative damage assessment. Additionally, markers of folate status and metabolism will be evaluated because they were affected in earlier NEEMO and ISS crewmembers, possibly through a mechanism that relates to oxidative insult.

Measurements will also include markers used to determine whether the increase in body iron storage during NEEMO missions is due to destruction of red blood cells, which would be a mechanism similar to what happens during space flight. On the basis of numerous studies of subjects at different altitudes, we expect that neocytolysis occurs upon exposure to the increase in pressure; however, this has not been measured directly in the NEEMO model.

Research Impact/Earth Benefits: Better characterization of oxidative damage along with iron and folate metabolism will have significant effects on our understanding of the human adaptation to microgravity. This will not only help drive changes to the defined nutritional requirements for spaceflight, but will also provide a better understanding of human physiology in altered environments, which enhances scientific and medical knowledge, with potential impact across the population.

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2010 
Task Progress: The NEEMO mission was conducted in May 2010, with final post-dive sample collections in August. Sample analysis has been completed, and data analysis, interpretation, and manuscript preparation are underway.

The decrease in folate status during the dive suggests that folate requirements may be higher in oxidative environments such as NEEMO. Further studies need to be conducted to determine whether folate supplementation can prevent the decrease in status.

This study shows that many of the abnormal markers of oxidative damage are already normalized by the end of the dive. Some markers, however, remained changed from baseline after 13 days of diving. NEEMO provides an excellent model to study iron metabolism and resulting changes in oxidative damage. Longer duration NEEMO missions need to be done in order to know if these markers of oxidative damage eventually normalize

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 05/25/2021)  Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
Articles in Peer-reviewed Journals Zwart SR, Jessup JM, Jiuping J, Smith SM. "Saturation diving alters folate status and biomarkers of DNA damange and repair." PLoS One. 2012 Feb;7(2):e31058. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0031058 , Feb-2012
Project Title:  Characterization of Oxidative Damage During a Saturation Dive Reduce
Fiscal Year: FY 2009 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Start Date: 10/01/2008  
End Date: 09/30/2010  
Task Last Updated: 09/08/2009 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Smith, Scott M Ph.D. / NASA Johnson Space Center 
Address:  Biomedical Research and Environmental Sciences Division/SK3 
2101 NASA Pkwy 
Houston , TX 77058-3607 
Email: scott.m.smith@nasa.gov 
Phone: 281-483-7204  
Congressional District: 36 
Web:  
Organization Type: NASA CENTER 
Organization Name: NASA Johnson Space Center 
Joint Agency:  
Comments:  
Co-Investigator(s)
Affiliation: 
Zwart, Sara  USRA/NASA Johnson Space Center 
Jessup, J. Milburn  NIH/National Cancer Institute/Cancer Diagnosis Program 
Project Information: Grant/Contract No. Directed Research 
Responsible Center: NASA JSC 
Grant Monitor: Meck, J@n  
Center Contact: 281-244-5405 
janice.v.meck@nasa.gov 
Solicitation / Funding Source: Directed Research 
Grant/Contract No.: Directed Research 
Project Type: GROUND 
Flight Program:  
TechPort: No 
No. of Post Docs:  
No. of PhD Candidates:  
No. of Master's Candidates:  
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:  
No. of PhD Degrees:  
No. of Master's Degrees:  
No. of Bachelor's Degrees:  
Human Research Program Elements: (1) HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Human Research Program Risks: (1) Nutrition:Risk of Inadequate Nutrition
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) N06:What impact does the spaceflight environment have on oxidative damage?
(2) N15:We need to identify the most important nutritional factors for oxidative damage during spaceflight (IRP Rev E)
Task Description: It is well understood that living in an environment with an increased partial pressure of oxygen will result in oxidative damage to the body – this is supported by our published data from NEEMO (NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations) V, XII, and XIII saturation dive missions. Similar types of oxidative damage are evident after long-duration space flight. In this study, we propose to expand the number of markers of oxidative damage measured in the earlier NEEMO missions to better characterize observed effects, and to also include biomarkers suggested by the National Cancer Institute and other members of the NIH at a joint NCI/NASA workshop on oxidative damage assessment. Additionally, markers of folate status and metabolism will be evaluated because they were affected in earlier NEEMO and ISS crewmembers, possibly through a mechanism that relates to oxidative insult.

Measurements will also include markers used to determine whether the increase in body iron storage during NEEMO missions is due to destruction of red blood cells, which would be a mechanism similar to what happens during space flight. On the basis of numerous studies of subjects at different altitudes, we expect that neocytolysis occurs upon exposure to the increase in pressure; however, this has not been measured directly in the NEEMO model.

Research Impact/Earth Benefits: 0

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2009 
Task Progress: New project for FY2009.

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 05/25/2021)  Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
 None in FY 2009