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Project Title:  Human Factors Assessment of Vibration Effects on Visual Performance During Launch Reduce
Fiscal Year: FY 2010 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP SHFH:Space Human Factors & Habitability (archival in 2017)
Start Date: 05/01/2008  
End Date: 09/30/2010  
Task Last Updated: 06/08/2011 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Holden, Kritina  Ph.D. / Leidos Corporation at NASA Johnson Space Center 
Address:  2101 NASA Pkwy/SF3 
Mail Code: C46 
Houston , TX 77058-3607 
Email: kritina.l.holden@nasa.gov 
Phone: 281-483-8829  
Congressional District: 22 
Web:  
Organization Type: NASA CENTER 
Organization Name: Leidos Corporation at NASA Johnson Space Center 
Joint Agency:  
Comments:  
Co-Investigator(s)
Affiliation: 
Thompson, Shelby  Lockheed Martin, Houston, TX 
Ebert, Doug  Wyle Integrated Science and Engineering Group 
Adelstein, Bernard   NASA Ames Research Center 
Root, Philip  NASA Johnson Space Center 
Jones, Jeff  NASA Johnson Space Center 
Project Information: 
Responsible Center: NASA JSC 
Grant Monitor: Woolford, Barbara  
Center Contact: 218-483-3701 
barbara.j.woolford@nasa.gov 
Solicitation / Funding Source: Directed Research 
Project Type: FLIGHT 
Flight Program: Shuttle 
TechPort: No 
No. of Post Docs:
No. of PhD Candidates:
No. of Master's Candidates:
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:
No. of PhD Degrees:
No. of Master's Degrees:
No. of Bachelor's Degrees:
Human Research Program Elements: (1) SHFH:Space Human Factors & Habitability (archival in 2017)
Human Research Program Risks: (1) Hab:Risk of an Incompatible Vehicle/Habitat Design
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) SHFE-HAB-03:We need to understand how new aspects of the natural and induced environment (e.g., vehicle/habitat architecture, acoustics, vibration, lighting) may impact performance, and need to be accommodated in internal vehicle/habitat design (IRP Rev E)
Flight Assignment/Project Notes: STS-119, STS-128

NOTE: Start date is 5/1/2008 (instead of 10/1/2008) per B. Woolford/JSC (5/09)

NOTE: End date will be 09/30/2010 (instead of 12/31/2009), per B. Woolford/JSC (4/17/2009)

NOTE: End date will be 12/31/2009 (instead of 9/30/2011), per B. Woolford/JSC (4/14/2009)

Task Description: The primary objective of the of Human Factors Short Duration Bioastronautics Investigation (SDBI) 1904 is to determine visual performance limits during operational vibration and g-loads, specifically through the determination of minimal usable font sizes using Orion-type display formats. Currently there is little to no data available to quantify human visual performance under these extreme conditions. Existing data on shuttle vibration magnitude and frequency is incomplete, does not address seat and crew vibration in the current configuration, and does not address human visual performance. There have been anecdotal reports of performance decrements from shuttle crews, but no structured data has been collected.

The SDBI is a companion effort to the Detailed Test Objective (DTO) 695, which will measure shuttle seat accelerations (vibration) during ascent. Data from the SDBI will serve an important role in interpreting the DTO vibration data. SDBI 1904 plans to collect data during the ascent phase of three shuttle missions. Both SDBI1904 and DTO 695 are low impact with respect to flight resources, and combined they represent an efficient and focused problem solving approach.

The SDBI and DTO data will be correlated to determine the nature of perceived visual performance under varying vibrations and g-loads. This project will provide:

• Immediate data for developing preliminary human performance vibration requirements

• Flight validated inputs for ongoing and future ground-based research

• Information of functional needs that will drive Orion display format design decisions

Research Impact/Earth Benefits: Data from Visual Performance may provide insight into display design for users who read displays under extreme vibration such as pilots or race car drivers. The project also offers methodologies for investigating visual performance in situ with real-world constraints.

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2010 
Task Progress: FY10 Accomplishments: A Final Report was produced using all data collected. Final results were presented at the 2009 Houston Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Symposium. Interim and final results were presented at Investigators Workshop. An interim report was generated using data from STS-128. All planned data collection was completed.

In collaboration with Detailed Technical Objective (DTO) 695, Short Duration Bioastronautics Investigation (SDBI) 1904 collected visual performance data during Shuttle ascent, using spacecraft systems displays printed on a placard. Data were collected from two crewmembers on STS-119, and three crewmembers on STS-128. All participants were seated on the middeck with accelerometers mounted at three locations on their seats. Only data from the headrest were used in the current analysis based on the assumption this was the area of vibration that would most impact visual performance. This document represents the final report combining the data from both flights.

The goal of this project was to examine the effect of vibration (combined with acceleration) during Shuttle launch on participants’ ability to perceive different size fonts and graphic information. In addition to the primary objective, information was collected on the readability of various characteristics of the display, such as text case, graphical information, and colors used for graphics.

An effect of vibration on readable font size was demonstrated, whereby minimum usable font size increased with vibration magnitude, as would be expected. Based on the operational data collected, it appears that with vibration below 0.2 grms, participants can perceive font sizes about 0.14 inches in height at a corrected 20 inch visual distance. However, when the vibration is above 0.2 grms, font sizes greater than 0.14 inches are needed for optimal visual performance. Trend analysis revealed that x- (chest-spine) and y- (side-to-side) axis vibration were the primary contributors to the font size effect.

Participants experienced difficulty distinguishing small valve graphics, gray flow lines, and red valves. Contrast issues become exacerbated with vibration, according to subjective data. Due to the limited number of participants in this investigation, ground-based studies should be conducted to further explore these results. Recommendations are provided, and potential forward work is suggested.

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 08/31/2018) 

Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
Abstracts for Journals and Proceedings Thompson S, Holden K, Ebert D, Root P, Adelstein B, Jones J. "Short Duration Bioastronautics Investigation (SDBI) 1904: Human Factors Assessment of Vibration Effects on Visual Performance During Launch." Presented at the Seventh Annual One-Day Symposium of Human Factors and Ergonomics, Houston, TX, May 21, 2010.

Seventh Annual One-Day Symposium of Human Factors and Ergonomics, Houston, TX, May 21, 2010. http://www.houstonhfes.org/conferences/conference2010/program.html , May-2010

Abstracts for Journals and Proceedings Thompson S, Holden K, Ebert D, Root P, Adelstein B, Jones J. "Short Duration Bioastronautics Investigation (SDBI) 1904: Human Factors Assessment of Vibration Effects on Visual Performance During Launch." Presented at the 2010 NASA Human Research Program Investigators' Workshop, Houston, TX, February 3-5, 2010.

2010 NASA Human Research Program Investigators' Workshop, Houston, TX, February 3-5, 2010. http://www.dsls.usra.edu/meetings/hrp2010/pdf/SHFH/1060Thompson.pdf , Feb-2010

Abstracts for Journals and Proceedings Holden K, Thompson S, Ebert D, Adelstein B, Root P, Jones J, Woolford B, Whitmore M. "Short Duration Bioastronautics Investigation (SDBI) 1904: Human Factors Assessment of Vibration Effects on Visual Performance During Launch. Interim Results for STS-119." Presented at the 2009 NASA Human Research Program Investigators' Workshop, League City, TX, February 2-4, 2009.

2009 NASA Human Research Program Investigators' Workshop, League City, TX, February 2-4, 2009. , Feb-2009

Awards Thompson S, Holden K, Ebert D, Root P, Adelstein B, Jones J. "Best Poster Award for 'Short Duration Bioastronautics Investigation (SDBI) 1904. Human Factors Assessment of Vibration Effects on Visual Performance During Launch,' Seventh Annual One-Day Symposium of the Houston Human Factors and Ergonomic Society, May 2010." May-2010
Project Title:  Human Factors Assessment of Vibration Effects on Visual Performance During Launch Reduce
Fiscal Year: FY 2009 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP SHFH:Space Human Factors & Habitability (archival in 2017)
Start Date: 05/01/2008  
End Date: 09/30/2010  
Task Last Updated: 06/16/2010 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Holden, Kritina  Ph.D. / Leidos Corporation at NASA Johnson Space Center 
Address:  2101 NASA Pkwy/SF3 
Mail Code: C46 
Houston , TX 77058-3607 
Email: kritina.l.holden@nasa.gov 
Phone: 281-483-8829  
Congressional District: 22 
Web:  
Organization Type: NASA CENTER 
Organization Name: Leidos Corporation at NASA Johnson Space Center 
Joint Agency:  
Comments:  
Co-Investigator(s)
Affiliation: 
Thompson, Shelby  Lockheed Martin, Houston, TX 
Ebert, Doug  Wyle Integrated Science and Engineering Group 
Adelstein, Bernard   NASA Ames Research Center 
Root, Philip  NASA Johnson Space Center 
Jones, Jeff  NASA Johnson Space Center 
Project Information: 
Responsible Center: NASA JSC 
Grant Monitor: Woolford, Barbara  
Center Contact: 218-483-3701 
barbara.j.woolford@nasa.gov 
Solicitation / Funding Source: Directed Research 
Project Type: FLIGHT 
Flight Program: Shuttle 
TechPort: No 
No. of Post Docs:
No. of PhD Candidates:
No. of Master's Candidates:
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:
No. of PhD Degrees:
No. of Master's Degrees:
No. of Bachelor's Degrees:
Human Research Program Elements: (1) SHFH:Space Human Factors & Habitability (archival in 2017)
Human Research Program Risks: (1) Hab:Risk of an Incompatible Vehicle/Habitat Design
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) SHFE-HAB-03:We need to understand how new aspects of the natural and induced environment (e.g., vehicle/habitat architecture, acoustics, vibration, lighting) may impact performance, and need to be accommodated in internal vehicle/habitat design (IRP Rev E)
Flight Assignment/Project Notes: STS-119, STS-128

NOTE: Start date is 5/1/2008 (instead of 10/1/2008) per B. Woolford/JSC (5/09)

NOTE: End date will be 09/30/2010 (instead of 12/31/2009), per B. Woolford/JSC (4/17/2009)

NOTE: End date will be 12/31/2009 (instead of 9/30/2011), per B. Woolford/JSC (4/2009)

Task Description: The primary objective of the of Human Factors Short Duration Bioastronautics Investigation (SDBI) 1904 is to determine visual performance limits during operational vibration and g-loads, specifically through the determination of minimal usable font sizes using Orion-type display formats. Currently there is little to no data available to quantify human visual performance under these extreme conditions. Existing data on shuttle vibration magnitude and frequency is incomplete, does not address seat and crew vibration in the current configuration, and does not address human visual performance. There have been anecdotal reports of performance decrements from shuttle crews, but no structured data has been collected.

The SDBI is a companion effort to the Detailed Test Objective (DTO) 695, which will measure shuttle seat accelerations (vibration) during ascent. Data from the SDBI will serve an important role in interpreting the DTO vibration data. SDBI 1904 plans to collect data during the ascent phase of three shuttle missions. Both SDBI1904 and DTO 695 are low impact with respect to flight resources, and combined they represent an efficient and focused problem solving approach.

The SDBI and DTO data will be correlated to determine the nature of perceived visual performance under varying vibrations and g-loads. This project will provide:

• Immediate data for developing preliminary human performance vibration requirements

• Flight validated inputs for ongoing and future ground-based research

• Information of functional needs that will drive Orion display format design decisions

Research Impact/Earth Benefits: Data from Visual Performance may provide insight into displays for workers who read displays under extreme vibration such as pilots or race car drivers. The project also offers methodologies for investigating visual performance in situ with real-world constraints.

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2009 
Task Progress: In FY09, JSC personnel completed data collection activities associated with the Short Duration Bioastronautics Investigation (SDBI 1904) – Human Factors Assessment of Vibration Effects on Visual Performance During Launch. In collaboration with Detailed Technical Objective (DTO 695), SDBI 1904 collected visual performance data during launch using a spacecraft system display printed on a placard. The goal was to examine the effect of vibration during launch on participants’ ability to perceive different size fonts. Crew comments were also recorded on various characteristics of the display, such as font, case, and display color. Data were collected from two crewmembers onboard STS-119. Data collection will continue in September from three crewmembers onboard STS-128.

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 08/31/2018) 

Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
 None in FY 2009
Project Title:  Human Factors Assessment of Vibration Effects on Visual Performance During Launch Reduce
Fiscal Year: FY 2008 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP SHFH:Space Human Factors & Habitability (archival in 2017)
Start Date: 05/01/2008  
End Date: 09/30/2010  
Task Last Updated: 03/17/2009 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Holden, Kritina  Ph.D. / Leidos Corporation at NASA Johnson Space Center 
Address:  2101 NASA Pkwy/SF3 
Mail Code: C46 
Houston , TX 77058-3607 
Email: kritina.l.holden@nasa.gov 
Phone: 281-483-8829  
Congressional District: 22 
Web:  
Organization Type: NASA CENTER 
Organization Name: Leidos Corporation at NASA Johnson Space Center 
Joint Agency:  
Comments:  
Co-Investigator(s)
Affiliation: 
Thompson, Shelby  Lockheed Martin, Houston, TX 
Ebert, Doug  Wyle Integrated Science and Engineering Group 
Adelstein, Bernard   NASA Ames Research Center 
Root, Philip  NASA Johnson Space Center 
Jones, Jeff  NASA Johnson Space Center 
Project Information: 
Responsible Center: NASA JSC 
Grant Monitor: Woolford, Barbara  
Center Contact: 218-483-3701 
barbara.j.woolford@nasa.gov 
Solicitation / Funding Source: Directed Research 
Project Type: FLIGHT 
Flight Program: Shuttle 
TechPort: No 
No. of Post Docs:  
No. of PhD Candidates:  
No. of Master's Candidates:  
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:  
No. of PhD Degrees:  
No. of Master's Degrees:  
No. of Bachelor's Degrees:  
Human Research Program Elements: (1) SHFH:Space Human Factors & Habitability (archival in 2017)
Human Research Program Risks: (1) Hab:Risk of an Incompatible Vehicle/Habitat Design
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) SHFE-HAB-03:We need to understand how new aspects of the natural and induced environment (e.g., vehicle/habitat architecture, acoustics, vibration, lighting) may impact performance, and need to be accommodated in internal vehicle/habitat design (IRP Rev E)
Flight Assignment/Project Notes: STS-119, STS-128

NOTE: Start date is 5/1/2008 (instead of 10/1/2008) per B. Woolford/JSC (5/09)

NOTE: End date will be 09/30/2010 (instead of 12/31/2009), per B. Woolford/JSC (4/17/2009)

NOTE: End date will be 12/31/2009 (instead of 9/30/2011), per B. Woolford/JSC (4/2009)

Task Description: The primary objective of the of Human Factors Short Duration Bioastronautics Investigation (SDBI) 1904 is to determine visual performance limits during operational vibration and g-loads, specifically through the determination of minimal usable font sizes using Orion-type display formats. Currently there is little to no data available to quantify human visual performance under these extreme conditions. Existing data on shuttle vibration magnitude and frequency is incomplete, does not address seat and crew vibration in the current configuration, and does not address human visual performance. There have been anecdotal reports of performance decrements from shuttle crews, but no structured data has been collected.

The SDBI is a companion effort to the Detailed Test Objective (DTO) 695, which will measure shuttle seat accelerations (vibration) during ascent. Data from the SDBI will serve an important role in interpreting the DTO vibration data. SDBI 1904 plans to collect data during the ascent phase of three shuttle missions. Both SDBI1904 and DTO 695 are low impact with respect to flight resources, and combined they represent an efficient and focused problem solving approach.

The SDBI and DTO data will be correlated to determine the nature of perceived visual performance under varying vibrations and g-loads. This project will provide:

• Immediate data for developing preliminary human performance vibration requirements

• Flight validated inputs for ongoing and future ground-based research

• Information of functional needs that will drive Orion display format design decisions

Research Impact/Earth Benefits: Data from Visual Performance will also provide insight into displays for workers who read displays under extreme vibration such as pilots or race car drivers.

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2008 
Task Progress: New project for FY2009.

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 08/31/2018) 

Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
 None in FY 2008