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Project Title:  Validation of On-Orbit Methodology for the Assessment of Cardiac Function and Changes in the Circulating Volume Using Ultrasound and Braslet-M Occlusion Cuffs, SDTO 17011 U/R (Braslet) Reduce
Fiscal Year: FY 2010 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP ExMC:Exploration Medical Capabilities
Start Date: 04/01/2007  
End Date: 09/30/2010  
Task Last Updated: 02/22/2011 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Duncan, James Michael M.D. / NASA Johnson Space Center 
Address:  Code SK37 
2101 NASA Road 1 
Houston , TX 77058 
Email: james.m.duncan@nasa.gov 
Phone: 281 483-2432  
Congressional District: 22 
Web:  
Organization Type: NASA CENTER 
Organization Name: NASA Johnson Space Center 
Joint Agency:  
Comments:  
Co-Investigator(s)
Affiliation: 
Alferova, Irina   Institute for Biomedical Problems, Moscow, Russia 
Dulchavsky, Scott  Henry Ford Hospital System, Detroit, MI 
Ebert, Douglas  Ph.D. Wyle 
Hamilton, Douglas  M.D., Ph.D. University of Texas Medical Branch 
Matveev, Vladimir   Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center, Star City, Russia 
Sargsyan, Ashot   M.D. Wyle 
Bogomolov , V.  M.D., Ph.D. Institute for Biomedical Problems, Moscow, Russia 
Key Personnel Changes / Previous PI: V.V. Bogomolov is the Russian Co-PI for this investigation
Project Information: Grant/Contract No. Directed Research 
Responsible Center: NASA JSC 
Grant Monitor: Watkins, Sharmi1a  
Center Contact: 281.483.0395 
sharmila.watkins@nasa.gov 
Solicitation / Funding Source: Directed Research 
Grant/Contract No.: Directed Research 
Project Type: FLIGHT 
Flight Program: ISS 
TechPort: Yes 
No. of Post Docs:
No. of PhD Candidates:
No. of Master's Candidates:
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:
No. of PhD Degrees:
No. of Master's Degrees:
No. of Bachelor's Degrees:
Human Research Program Elements: (1) ExMC:Exploration Medical Capabilities
Human Research Program Risks: (1) Arrhythmia:Risk of Cardiac Rhythm Problems
(2) ExMC:Risk of Unacceptable Health and Mission Outcomes Due to Limitations of In-flight Medical Capabilities (IRP Rev E)
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) CV07:How are fluids redistributed in flight?
(2) ExMC 4.02:We do not have the capability to provide non-invasive medical imaging during exploration missions (IRP Rev E)
Flight Assignment/Project Notes: ISS 16, 18, 19, 20

Task Description: Validation of On-Orbit Methodology for the Assessment of Cardiac Function and Changes in the Circulating Volume Using Ultrasound and Braslet-M Occlusion Cuffs (Braslet) is Station Development Test Objective (SDTO) 17011 sponsored by NASA and Russian Federal Space Agency (FSA). Braslet is testing the ability of ultrasound to detect cardiovascular changes in response to volume distribution changes that are induced by the Braslet occlusion cuffs. Understanding the effects of this countermeasure on cardiovascular function in a microgravity environment will be useful for both medical operations and future research.

See also https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/experiments/explorer/Investigation.html?#id=347

Research Impact/Earth Benefits: Space Applications

This SDTO will provide refinements in remote guidance techniques which will allow detailed ultrasound exams to be performed in space with remote guidance by technicians and physicians on the ground. This will enhance the diagnostic and research capabilities of the International Space Station (ISS) ultrasound. Data will also be collected regarding the utility and potentially expanded uses of the Braslet-M device for both ISS and exploration class missions. A more detailed understanding of the cardiovascular response to microgravity-induced fluid shifts will also be gained from this work.

Earth Applications

Refinements in remote guidance techniques provided by Braslet will similarly allow detailed ultrasound exams to be performed in terrestrial locations remote from experienced ultrasound technicians and physicians. Examples include rural clinics, disaster areas, and military applications. Additionally, during this SDTO data will be collected regarding the physiological responses to altered circulatory volume distribution which may lend insight to the diagnosis and treatment of terrestrial conditions (such as cardiovascular disease) which result in altered fluid status.

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2010 
Task Progress: The Braslet SDTO was a limited in-flight investigation pursuing the development, testing, and validation of novel non-invasive methodologies for cardiovascular system evaluation in conditions of space flight with an emphasis on using Braslet-M device for hemodynamic modification. The objectives of this study were fully met:

• Non-invasive ultrasound measurement techniques for comprehensive cardiac and vascular evaluation were establish and validated

• A methodology was developed and validated to assess the circulating volume changes and cardiac function in space flight conditions, through short-term hemodynamic modification using Braslet-M occlusion cuffs

• The utility of Valsalva and Mueller respiratory maneuvers as means of modifying preload and afterload was verified as a technique to obtain additional functional information regarding the effect of Braslet and its clinical and scientific significance

• The tissue Doppler capability of the Human Research Facility (HRF) Ultrasound was activated and tested

The human body experiences significant volume shifts and reduction in venous reserve during extended exposure to microgravity. The cardiovascular system preserves effective circulating volume through standard homeostatic physiological response to reduced gravity. Therefore even though astronauts and cosmonauts are hypovolemic by terrestrial standards, they are euvolemic by space standards. This effect can be partially and acutely reverted towards terrestrial fluid distribution and overall hypovolemia through the use of Braslet.

The Braslet-M device, when used per the current calibration and directions, consistently causes fluid sequestration in the vascular bed of the lower extremities. This was demonstrated through the significant distention of venous reservoirs of lower extremities as detected by consistent increases in femoral vein cross-sectional area. This SDTO also demonstrated the effectiveness of the Braslet in temporarily reducing the effective circulating volume during space flight, as demonstrated by cardiac parameters which indicate a reduction in preload. Modified Valsalva and Mueller maneuvers resulted in measureable changes in hemodynamic distribution. Although many of these changes did not reach statistical significance, the trends were clear. Since breathing maneuvers were not tightly regulated or monitored, it is likely that the pressures created by these maneuvers varied from subject to subject, and even between individual data points within the same session. These variations in pressures may have resulted in a broader distribution of data points, precluding statistical conclusions in this relatively low n study. However, due to clear trends and several significant indicators in the data, a healthy individual’s volume status can be estimated by observing specific effects of the Braslet-M device on the effective circulating volume when respiratory maneuvers are performed.

Initially the team expected the internal jugular vein (IJV) to be a simple and reliable indicator of fluid status. While this is the case in most subjects, the variability in this data was large, perhaps due to the extreme compliance of this vessel. For example, simple actions such as speaking during scanning sessions resulted in large changes in the IJV area. The IJV is near maximal distention in chronic microgravity environments. The trends in the data indicate that Braslet relieved much of the excess cephalic fluid load and allowed a broader range of venous areas. While not achieving statistical significance, this is an excellent example of the synergy of fluid sequestration by Braslet superimposed with breathing maneuvers to broaden the range of sensitivity.

This SDTO demonstrated that minimal crew training, combined with just-in-time on-orbit training and remote expert guidance, can be successfully used to complete complex medical diagnostic tasks such as advanced ultrasound examinations. Ultrasound was rapidly and accurately performed by all crewmember operators in a number of specific applications which have direct operational relevance to current and future missions and would provide direct, important medical information to impact the diagnosis and treatment of in-flight medical conditions. The expanded ultrasound applications described and performed for this SDTO are also relevant to space medical and physiologic research. Minimal resources, training, and crew time were required to complete these complex tasks; this should serve as a successful model for future space flight operations and experiments. Elements of general telemedicine, training, and scanning techniques developed and refined during this SDTO are already being incorporated into routine medical operations. Specific elements of vascular scanning and fluid shift alterations may be used in the near future to address pressing crew health questions related to intracranial hypertension.

The Braslet device has potential medical application due to its mechanism of action. Pulmonary edema secondary to left ventricular failure is caused by increased pulmonary venous pressure and ensuing interstitial edema. Nitroglycerin acts through the release of nitrous oxide and its effect is modulated by vascular endothelial superoxide levels, to relax vascular smooth muscle. The principal benefit of these changes is to decrease systemic vascular resistance, increase venous compliance, decrease pulmonary capillary wedge pressure and mean arterial pressure, which should relieve cardiac-induced pulmonary edema. Given the microgravity-induced cephalad fluid shifts and the changes in lower-extremity intravascular volume, the use of common venodilators such as nitroglycerin may not be as efficacious in the immediate treatment of pulmonary edema. It is known that rotating tourniquets or thigh cuffs induce lower extremity venous pooling and reduce the circulating blood volume, which reduces left ventricular end-diastolic pressure. This investigation showed that the Braslet thigh cuffs impede lower-extremity venous return but not arterial flow. A device like the Braslet can be used to treat congestive heart failure and orthopnea in many parts of the world as well as in reduced gravity environments. While Braslet imparts a physical effect as opposed to a pharmaceutical effect, the effective dose can still be estimated by measuring the constraining effect with the resultant fluid sequestration and cardiovascular effect. This relationship is not well understood for Braslet, and is being currently being researched under the “Braslet Investigation Grant” (NSBRI--National Space Biomedical Research Institute--PI Scott Dulchavsky).

Load-dependent echo measurements such as spectral flow Doppler through the mitral valve measure blood flow into the left ventricle during early and late diastole. This mitral valve inflow also reflects changes to the load on the left ventricle. Mitral inflow Doppler is a load-dependent parameter and decreases in response to reduced preload. By manipulating preload with Braslet and Mueller respiratory maneuvers, a reduction in preload can be measured as lower velocities and extended relaxation slopes in the mitral valve waveform. This inflow pattern demonstrates the effect of the Braslet.

Tissue Doppler (TD), unlike the spectral inflow Doppler, is a relatively independent loading parameter used in echocardiography. The myocardial performance index (sometimes referred to as Tei index) is calculated using diastolic and systolic time intervals as a combined measure of myocardial performance (IVCT+IVRT/ET). The Tei index is a simple and feasible indicator of overall ventricular function. In this study Tei was calculated from the time indices of both the right ventricular (RV) TD and left ventricular TD. Normal terrestrial Tei indices in the RV are < 0.3, while the data collected in microgravity during this SDTO show that all but one subject are consistently above this level. It is hypothesized that this is a result of chronic exposure to microgravity resulting in transiently increased right ventricle pressure or left atrial pressures. However it is not yet clear what this finding means, as the Tei index has been traditionally considered a relatively load-independent parameter. It is interesting to note that application of Braslet does reduce the RV Tei index, indicating a shift toward terrestrial fluid distribution and cardiac performance presumably as a result of reduction to the effective circulating volume. In a microgravity-adapted crewmember, reduction in circulating volume brings central and cephalic fluid status closer to that seen terrestrially.

LV E’ (left ventricular velocity) was significantly reduced during all maneuvers when Braslet was applied. The data therefore suggest that this is a repeatable and reliable means to assess volume status change on the order of that induced by Braslet. This measure is, however, less sensitive to the smaller and more acute changes induced by the breathing maneuvers.

Mueller maneuver with Braslet on caused a profound decrease in RV IVRT which may be due to significantly reduced preload secondary to a reduced effective circulating volume. This is further seen in the trend of reduced Tei index during Mueller maneuvers, even with Braslet off. These findings are consistent with a supine patient on Earth who is hypovolemic. This indicates that Braslet causes the expected fluid sequestration in the lower extremities, which is clearly reflected in echocardiographic parameters.

Previously, the effect of acute volume change to the RV was unknown in any group of long duration astronauts. Hemodynamic manipulation with the Braslet-M as a tool for assessing RV physiology in space proved to be a useful non-invasive evaluation of RV function using the on-board ISS ultrasound. Further understanding of RV function could be significant to long duration crewmember cardiac health and requires additional review. This study revealed a small but useful reference data set for future clinical and research studies in echocardiography.

In Conclusion:

• Remotely guided ultrasound is an effective and objective means of measuring fluid status changes, including the physiological effects of Braslet.

• The Braslet device reduces the effective circulating volume.

• Valsalva and Mueller respiratory maneuvers augment the physiologic responses to fluid sequestration.

• Tissue Doppler is a reliable and sensitive tool for assessing fluid status changes, particularly the LV E’ parameter.

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 08/30/2018) 

Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
Abstracts for Journals and Proceedings Bogomolov VV, Alferova IV, Dulchavsky SA, Ebert D, Garcia KM, Martin DS, Matveev VP, Melton SL, Sargsyan AE, Hamilton DR, Duncan JM. "Acute Modifications of Circulating Volume and Respiratory Maneuvers in the Cardiovascular Assessment of Long-Duration Crewmembers." Presented at the Aerospace Medical Association 81st Annual Meeting, Phoenix, AZ, May 9-13, 2010.

Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine, 2010 Mar; 81(3):232. http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/asma/asem/2010/00000081/00000003 , Mar-2010

Abstracts for Journals and Proceedings Hamilton DR, Barratt MR, Sargsyan AE, Ebert D, Garcia KM, Martin DS, Dulchavsky SA, Duncan JM. "Right Ventricular Tissue Doppler in Space Flight." Presented at the Aerospace Medical Association 81st Annual Meeting, Phoenix, AZ, May 9-13, 2010.

Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine, 2010 Mar; 81(3):229-30. http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/asma/asem/2010/00000081/00000003 , Mar-2010

Abstracts for Journals and Proceedings Hamilton DR, Barratt MR, Sargsyan AE, Garcia KM, Ebert D, Martin DS, Dulchavsky SA, Duncan JM. "Acute Hemodynamic Effects of the Braslet-M Device on the International Space Station." Presented at the Aerospace Medical Association 81st Annual Meeting, Phoenix, AZ, May 9-13, 2010.

Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine, 2010 Mar; 81(3):291-2. http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/asma/asem/2010/00000081/00000003 , Mar-2010

Articles in Other Journals or Periodicals Garcia KM, Hamilton DR, Barratt MR, Sargsyan AE, Ebert D, Martin DS, Bogomolov VV, Dulchavsky SA, Duncan JM. "Right ventricular tissue Doppler in space flight." Invited submission to Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine. February 2011. (Ed. note: not found online as of August 2018) , Feb-2011
Articles in Peer-reviewed Journals Hamilton DR, Sargsyan AE, Garcia K, Ebert DJ, Whitson PA, Feiveson AH, Alferova IV, Dulchavsky SA, Matveev VP, Bogomolov VV, Duncan JM. "Cardiac and vascular responses to thigh cuffs and respiratory maneuvers on crewmembers of the International Space Station." J Appl Physiol (1985). 2012 Feb;112(3):454-62. Epub 2011 Sep 8. http://dx.doi.org/10.1152/japplphysiol.00557.2011 ; PubMed PMID: 21903875 (originally reported as In preparation, February 2011.) , Feb-2012
Articles in Peer-reviewed Journals Hamilton DR, Alferova IV, Sargsyan AE, Fincke EM, Magnus SH, Lonchakov YV, Dulchavsky SA, Ebert D, Garcia K, Martin D, Matveev VP, Voronkov YI, Melton SL, Bogomolov VV, Duncan JM. "Right ventricular tissue Doppler assessment in space during circulating volume modification using the Braslet device." Acta Astronaut. 2011 May-Jun;68(9-10):1501-8. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.actaastro.2009.11.015 , May-2011
Project Title:  Validation of On-Orbit Methodology for the Assessment of Cardiac Function and Changes in the Circulating Volume Using Ultrasound and Braslet-M Occlusion Cuffs, SDTO 17011 U/R (Braslet) Reduce
Fiscal Year: FY 2009 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP ExMC:Exploration Medical Capabilities
Start Date: 04/01/2007  
End Date: 09/30/2010  
Task Last Updated: 05/15/2009 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Duncan, James Michael M.D. / NASA Johnson Space Center 
Address:  Code SK37 
2101 NASA Road 1 
Houston , TX 77058 
Email: james.m.duncan@nasa.gov 
Phone: 281 483-2432  
Congressional District: 22 
Web:  
Organization Type: NASA CENTER 
Organization Name: NASA Johnson Space Center 
Joint Agency:  
Comments:  
Co-Investigator(s)
Affiliation: 
Alferova, Irina   Institute for Biomedical Problems, Moscow, Russia 
Dulchavsky, Scott  Henry Ford Hospital System, Detroit, MI 
Ebert, Douglas  Ph.D. Wyle 
Hamilton, Douglas  M.D., Ph.D. University of Texas Medical Branch 
Matveev, Vladimir   Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center, Star City, Russia 
Sargsyan, Ashot   M.D. Wyle 
Bogomolov , V. V. M.D., Ph.D. Institute for Biomedical Problems, Moscow, Russia 
Key Personnel Changes / Previous PI: V.V. Bogomolov is the Russian Co-PI for this investigation
Project Information: 
Responsible Center: NASA JSC 
Grant Monitor: Watkins, Sharmi1a  
Center Contact: 281.483.0395 
sharmila.watkins@nasa.gov 
Solicitation / Funding Source: Directed Research 
Project Type: FLIGHT 
Flight Program: ISS 
TechPort: Yes 
No. of Post Docs:
No. of PhD Candidates:
No. of Master's Candidates:
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:
No. of PhD Degrees:
No. of Master's Degrees:
No. of Bachelor's Degrees:
Human Research Program Elements: (1) ExMC:Exploration Medical Capabilities
Human Research Program Risks: (1) Arrhythmia:Risk of Cardiac Rhythm Problems
(2) ExMC:Risk of Unacceptable Health and Mission Outcomes Due to Limitations of In-flight Medical Capabilities (IRP Rev E)
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) CV07:How are fluids redistributed in flight?
(2) ExMC 4.02:We do not have the capability to provide non-invasive medical imaging during exploration missions (IRP Rev E)
Flight Assignment/Project Notes: ISS 16, 18, 19, 20

Task Description: Validation of On-Orbit Methodology for the Assessment of Cardiac Function and Changes in the Circulating Volume Using Ultrasound and Braslet-M Occlusion Cuffs (Braslet) is Station Development Test Objective (SDTO) 17011 sponsored by NASA and Russian Federal Space Agency (FSA). Braslet is testing the ability of ultrasound to detect cardiovascular changes in response to volume distribution changes that are induced by the Braslet occlusion cuffs. Understanding the effects of this countermeasure on cardiovascular function in a microgravity environment will be useful for both medical operations and future research.

See also http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/experiments/356.html

Research Impact/Earth Benefits: Space Applications

This SDTO will provide refinements in remote guidance techniques which will allow detailed ultrasound exams to be performed in space with remote guidance by technicians and physicians on the ground. This will enhance the diagnostic and research capabilities of the ISS ultrasound. Data will also be collected regarding the utility and potentially expanded uses of the Braslet-M device for both ISS and exploration class missions. A more detailed understanding of the cardiovascular response to microgravity-induced fluid shifts will also be gained from this work.

Earth Applications

Refinements in remote guidance techniques provided by Braslet will similarly allow detailed ultrasound exams to be performed in terrestrial locations remote from experienced ultrasound technicians and physicians. Examples include rural clinics, disaster areas, and military applications. Additionally, during this SDTO data will be collected regarding the physiological responses to altered circulatory volume distribution which may lend insight to the diagnosis and treatment of terrestrial conditions (such as cardiovascular disease) which result in altered fluid status.

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2009 
Task Progress: Protocol Development:

Following appropriate board approvals and flight selection, the Braslet Station Developmental Test Objective (SDTO) team undertook an intensive period of protocol development. Using the mockup of the US laboratory module (Destiny) at JSC, which houses an operational, flight-like ultrasound unit and the capability to simulate remote guidance, the team developed data collection techniques and ergonomics to allow the most streamlined collection of data on-orbit. A checklist and data log was produced that insures that data collection proceeds in a standardized manner. Reference images of target ultrasound images were also produced and uplinked to ISS. These image documents proved to be highly effective and complementary to remote guidance during on-orbit operations.

Training:

One crewmember from each planned Expedition was chosen as the ultrasound operator. The operator can also serve as a subject due to the development of self-scanning techniques. Operator crewmembers received 1-2 hours didactic and hands-on remote guidance training several months prior to the start of their increment. A short training video (~3 min) was also produced and uplinked to ISS for review within a day of performing the first scanning session. Subjects received no Braslet SDTO specific training, so this video was also instrumental in familiarizing subjects with breathing techniques and the experimental protocol.

On-orbit Data Collection:

The Braslet SDTO is a Medical Operations “reserve activity”, which means that time for the project is not scheduled prior to the beginning of each increment. In coordination with mission planners and biomedical engineers, the team must match usable blocks of crew time. Many times this involves capitalizing on slips in mission schedules, such as the delay of a Shuttle launch. These constraints require the team and the crew to be flexible with the timing of scanning sessions and with the total available data collection sessions with each Expedition.

During Increment 16, data was collected on four crewmembers during six scanning sessions. One session was incomplete due to an on-orbit hardware problem. Due to mission constraints only one of completed scans was a repeat scan on the same crewmember. At the end of Expedition 16, the Braslet SDTO team had collected 1 complete paired data set and 3 individual data sets.

During Increment 18, data was collected on 3 crewmembers during five scanning sessions. Two of these crewmembers participated twice, resulting in 2 additional paired data sets. The final subject was unable to schedule another session prior to the end of the mission.

In summary, at the end of Increment 18 a total of 3 paired scan sets and 4 individual data sets had been collected. An additional 2 pairs of scans are planned (but not scheduled) during Expedition 20.

Preliminary Results:

• Internal jugular and femoral vein measurements of area and diameter across the minor and major axis were taken throughout the cardiac cycle. These correspond with expected Jugular Venous Pressures (JVP).

• In 0G, internal jugular diameter at baseline, modified Valsalva and modified Mueller maneuver were diminished after Braslet-M application.

• In 0G, common femoral vein diameters increased in diameter after Braslet-M application.

• In 0G, resting cardiac dimensions were reduced after Braslet-M application.

• Early diastolic Doppler across the mitral valve demonstrates progressive changes to the deceleration times with maneuvers both before and after Braslet has sequestered blood in the lower extremities.

• Early diastolic velocities of Tissue Doppler (relatively load independent measure) were reduced by both maneuvers and after Braslet application.

Conclusion:

The Braslet-M device reduces cardiac preload by reducing venous return and cardiac output. Terrestrially, Valsalva causes transient increases in right atria pressure and a Mueller maneuver will cause temporary reduction in right atria pressure. The modified respiratory maneuvers used in this SDTO likewise reveal similar physiologic changes in long duration crewmembers in 0g.

Initial analysis indicates that with Braslet application, internal jugular vein variations in size and area in response to Valsalva and Mueller are diminished. Common femoral vein areas nearly double after the sequestering effects produced by Braslet-M application. The Braslet-M device appears to adequately reduce preload and augment cardiac and vascular physiologic responses in crewmembers with space-acclimatized hearts.

Taken together, these data support the notion that remotely-guided ultrasound exams can be used to monitor a variety of cardiovascular parameters that are altered with acute fluid and pressure modifications.

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 08/30/2018) 

Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
Abstracts for Journals and Proceedings Bogomolov VV, Duncan JM, Alferova1 IV, Dulchavsky SA, Ebert D, Hamilton DR, Matveev VP, Sargsyan AE. "Validation of On-Orbit Methodology for the Assessment of Cardiac Function and Changes in the Circulating Volume Using Ultrasound and “Braslet-M” Occlusion Cuffs." Presented at the NASA Human Research Program Investigator's Workshop 2008, League City, TX, Feb 4-6, 2008.

NASA Human Research Program Investigator's Workshop 2008, League City, TX, Feb 4-6, 2008. , Feb-2008

Abstracts for Journals and Proceedings Bogomolov VV, Duncan JM, Alferova1 IV, Dulchavsky SA, Ebert D, Hamilton DR, Garcia KM, Matveev VP, Sargsyan AE. "Validation of On-Orbit Methodology for the Assessment of Cardiac Function and Changes in the Circulating Volume Using Ultrasound and “Braslet-M” Occlusion Cuffs." Presented at the NASA Human Research Program Investigator's Workshop 2009, League City, TX, Feb 2-4, 2009.

NASA Human Research Program Investigator's Workshop 2009, League City, TX, Feb 2-4, 2009. , Feb-2009

Papers from Meeting Proceedings Hamilton DR, Sargsyan AE, Fincke EM, Magnus SH, Lonchakov YV, Alferova1 IV, Dulchavsky SA, Ebert D, Garcia K, Martin D, Matveev VP, Voronkov YI, Melton SL, Duncan JM, Bogomolov VV. "Right Ventricular Tissue Doppler Assessment in Space During Circulating Volume Modification using the Braslet-M Device" 17th IAA Humans in Space Symposium, International Academy of Astronautics, Moscow, Russia, June 7-11, 2009.

17th IAA Humans in Space Symposium Proceedings, International Academy of Astronautics, June 2009. , Jun-2009

Project Title:  Validation of On-Orbit Methodology for the Assessment of Cardiac Function and Changes in the Circulating Volume Using Ultrasound and Braslet-M Occlusion Cuffs, SDTO 17011 U/R (Braslet) Reduce
Fiscal Year: FY 2007 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP ExMC:Exploration Medical Capabilities
Start Date: 04/01/2007  
End Date: 09/30/2010  
Task Last Updated: 02/19/2009 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Duncan, James Michael M.D. / NASA Johnson Space Center 
Address:  Code SK37 
2101 NASA Road 1 
Houston , TX 77058 
Email: james.m.duncan@nasa.gov 
Phone: 281 483-2432  
Congressional District: 22 
Web:  
Organization Type: NASA CENTER 
Organization Name: NASA Johnson Space Center 
Joint Agency:  
Comments:  
Co-Investigator(s)
Affiliation: 
Alferova, Irina   Institute for Biomedical Problems, Moscow, Russia 
Dulchavsky, Scott  Henry Ford Hospital System, Detroit, MI 
Ebert, Douglas  Wyle Laboratories 
Hamilton, Douglas  Wyle Laboratories 
Matveev, Vladimir   Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center, Star City, Russia 
Sargsyan, Ashot   Wyle Laboratories 
Project Information: 
Responsible Center: NASA JSC 
Grant Monitor: Watkins, Sharmi1a  
Center Contact: 281.483.0395 
sharmila.watkins@nasa.gov 
Solicitation / Funding Source: Directed Research 
Project Type: FLIGHT 
Flight Program: ISS 
TechPort: Yes 
No. of Post Docs:  
No. of PhD Candidates:  
No. of Master's Candidates:  
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:  
No. of PhD Degrees:  
No. of Master's Degrees:  
No. of Bachelor's Degrees:  
Human Research Program Elements: (1) ExMC:Exploration Medical Capabilities
Human Research Program Risks: (1) Arrhythmia:Risk of Cardiac Rhythm Problems
(2) ExMC:Risk of Unacceptable Health and Mission Outcomes Due to Limitations of In-flight Medical Capabilities (IRP Rev E)
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) CV07:How are fluids redistributed in flight?
(2) ExMC 4.02:We do not have the capability to provide non-invasive medical imaging during exploration missions (IRP Rev E)
Flight Assignment/Project Notes: ISS 16, 18

Task Description: Validation of On-Orbit Methodology for the Assessment of Cardiac Function and Changes in the Circulating Volume Using Ultrasound and Braslet-M Occlusion Cuffs (Braslet) is Station Development Test Objective (SDTO) 17011 sponsored by NASA and Russian Federal Space Agency (FSA). Braslet is testing the performance of occlusion cuffs in modifying fluid shifts that occur early during physiological transition into the space environment. Understanding the effects of this countermeasure on cardiovascular function will be useful for both medical operations and future research.

See also http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/experiments/356.html

Research Impact/Earth Benefits: Space Applications

This SDTO will provide refinements in remote guidance techniques which will allow detailed ultrasound exams to be performed in space with remote guidance by technicians and physicians on the ground. This will enhance the diagnostic and research capabilities of the ISS ultrasound. Data will also be collected regarding the utility and potentially expanded uses of the Braslet-M device for both ISS and exploration class missions. A more detailed understanding of the cardiovascular response to microgravity-induced fluid shifts will also be gained from this work.

Earth Applications

Refinements in remote guidance techniques provided by Braslet will similarly allow detailed ultrasound exams to be performed in terrestrial locations remote from experienced ultrasound technicians and physicians. Examples include rural clinics, disaster areas, and military applications. Additionally, during this SDTO data will be collected regarding the physiological responses to altered circulatory volume distribution which may lend insight to the diagnosis and treatment of terrestrial conditions (such as cardiovascular disease) which result in altered fluid status.

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2007 
Task Progress: New project for FY2007. Task added to Task Book in February 2009.

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 08/30/2018) 

Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
 None in FY 2007