Menu

 

Task Book: Biological & Physical Sciences Division and Human Research Program
Advanced Search     

Project Title:  Tissue-Equivalent Radiation Dosimeter-On-A-Chip Reduce
Fiscal Year: FY 2008 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP SR:Space Radiation
Start Date: 02/11/2008  
End Date: 02/10/2010  
Task Last Updated: 11/30/2009 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Christian, James  Ph.D. / Radiation Monitoring Devices, Inc. 
Address:  44 Hunt Street 
 
Watertown , MA 02472-4699 
Email: JChristian@rmdinc.com 
Phone: (616) 668-6897  
Congressional District:
Web:  
Organization Type: INDUSTRY 
Organization Name: Radiation Monitoring Devices, Inc. 
Joint Agency:  
Comments:  
Project Information: Grant/Contract No. NNJ08JA55C 
Responsible Center: NASA JSC 
Grant Monitor: Cucinott1a, Francis  
Center Contact: 281-483-0968 
noaccess@nasa.gov 
Solicitation / Funding Source: SBIR Phase II 
Grant/Contract No.: NNJ08JA55C 
Project Type: GROUND 
Flight Program:  
TechPort: No 
No. of Post Docs:  
No. of PhD Candidates:  
No. of Master's Candidates:  
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:  
No. of PhD Degrees:  
No. of Master's Degrees:  
No. of Bachelor's Degrees:  
Human Research Program Elements: (1) SR:Space Radiation
Human Research Program Risks: (1) ARS:Risk of Acute Radiation Syndromes Due to Solar Particle Events (SPEs)
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) Acute05:What are the optimal SPE alert and dosimetry technologies for EVAs?
Task Description: Available digital dosimeters are bulky and unable to provide real-time monitoring of dose for space radiation. The complexity of space-flight design requires reliable, fault-tolerant equipment capable of providing real-time dose readings during a mission, which is not feasible with the existing thermo-luminescent dosimeter (TLD) technology, especially during extravehicular activities (EVA). Real-time monitoring is important for low-Earth orbiting spacecraft and interplanetary space flight to alert the crew when Solar Particle Events (SPE) increase the particle flux of the spacecraft environment. The Phase-II project will design and fabricate a prototype Dosimeter-on-a-Chip (DoseChip) for personal dosimetry comprised of a tissue-equivalent scintillation crystal coupled to a solid-state photomultiplier (SSPM). The ubiquitous nature of CMOS technology provides a standardized development platform, and the ability to integrate the supporting electronics into a miniature, lightweight design. The DoseChip provides a tissue-equivalent response to the relevant energies and types of radiation for low-Earth orbit and interplanetary space flight to the moon or Mars and will be sensitive to the dose rates and particle fluxes of ambient Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) to the higher rates of major SPE. The DoseChip will complement the existing Crew Passive Dosimeters by providing real-time dosimetry and as an alarming monitor for SPE.

Research Impact/Earth Benefits: Inexpensive radiation dosimeters are in general demand for commercial applications, such as personnel or waste monitoring, other applications include border monitoring for homeland security and protecting satellites and ground-based equipment from solar flares. The ability to inexpensively mass-produce these devices creates an entirely new market for arrays of distributed sensors. As high altitude commercial flight become more prevalent, active dosimeters can provide the redundant safeguards and information required to protect companies from unnecessary litigation and passengers from hazardous radiation conditions.

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2008 
Task Progress: New project for FY2008. Reporting not required for this SBIR Phase 2 project.

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: )  Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
 None in FY 2008