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Project Title:  Countermeasures to Neurobehavioral Deficits from Cumulative Sleep Deprivation During Space Flight: Dose-Response Effects of Recovery Sleep Opportunities Reduce
Fiscal Year: FY 2008 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP BHP:Behavioral Health & Performance (archival in 2017)
Start Date: 06/01/2004  
End Date: 05/31/2008  
Task Last Updated: 10/08/2008 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Dinges, David F. Ph.D. / University of Pennsylvania 
Address:  Department of Psychiatry 
423 Service Dr., 1013 Blockley Hall 
Philadelphia , PA 19104-4209 
Email: dinges@pennmedicine.upenn.edu 
Phone: 215-898-9949  
Congressional District:
Web:  
Organization Type: UNIVERSITY 
Organization Name: University of Pennsylvania 
Joint Agency:  
Comments:  
Co-Investigator(s)
Affiliation: 
Banks, Siobhan  University of Pennsylvania Health System 
Project Information: Grant/Contract No. NCC 9-58-HPF00404 
Responsible Center: NSBRI 
Grant Monitor:  
Center Contact:   
Solicitation / Funding Source: 2003 Biomedical Research & Countermeasures 03-OBPR-04 
Grant/Contract No.: NCC 9-58-HPF00404 
Project Type: GROUND 
Flight Program:  
TechPort: Yes 
No. of Post Docs:
No. of PhD Candidates:
No. of Master's Candidates:
No. of Bachelor's Candidates: 41 
No. of PhD Degrees:
No. of Master's Degrees:
No. of Bachelor's Degrees: 18 
Human Research Program Elements: (1) BHP:Behavioral Health & Performance (archival in 2017)
Human Research Program Risks: (1) Sleep:Risk of Performance Decrements and Adverse Health Outcomes Resulting from Sleep Loss, Circadian Desynchronization, and Work Overload (IRP Rev F)
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) Sleep Gap 09:We need to identify an integrated, individualized suite of countermeasures and protocols for implementing these countermeasures to prevent and/or treat chronic partial sleep loss, work overload, and/or circadian shifting, in spaceflight (IRP Rev E)
Task Description: (1) The overarching goal of this project is to develop sleep schedule countermeasures to ensure optimal neurocognitive performance capability in astronauts during prolonged space flight. The primary aim is to determine the sleep dose-response effects of an acute change in sleep duration that occurs between two periods of chronic sleep restriction on neurocognitive performance functions, subjective states, and waking and sleep physiology.

The optimal performance of astronauts during extended-duration space flight depends heavily on achieving recovery through adequate sleep. There is now extensive evidence that astronaut sleep in space averages 4 to 6.5 hours per day, and when critical operations (e.g., nighttime docking) are scheduled, very little sleep may be obtained during a day prior to the critical event. Ground-based experiments on healthy adults by our laboratory and others have demonstrated that limiting daily sleep duration to less than 7 hours leads to cumulative deficits in neurocognitive performance and alertness. Within 1-2 weeks of sleep restriction at levels experienced by astronauts, performance deficits were serious; impairments on tasks requiring sustained attention, working memory and cognitive throughput reached levels equivalent to those found after 1-2 nights of total sleep loss.

The experiment will determine the countermeasure benefits for performance (during critical operations and subsequent days of sleep restriction) from an acute increase in sleep duration (i.e., single night of recovery sleep). In addition, generating sleep dose-response functions will provide critically needed information on the adverse performance consequences of an acute reduction in sleep duration below the chronic sleep-restriction level, which can occur in space flight prior to a day of critical operations. We will establish sleep dose-response curves for the immediate and delayed impact on neurobehavioral functions, of an acute (1 night) change in sleep duration midway in a period of chronic sleep restriction. We will determine if performance recovery is complete after 2 nights of extended sleep, following chronic sleep restriction. In addition to the impact of a single night intervention (specific aim 1), we seek to resolve whether complete neurobehavioral recovery from prolonged chronic sleep restriction is possible within 2 nights. We will investigate the relationship between sleep physiology and performance responses. We will investigate the effects of chronic sleep restriction, acute sleep intervention, and recovery sleep on cardiovascular indices. (2) We are currently in the process of performing preliminary analyses on the data collected. Specifically, we are analyzing the neurobehavioral performance changes across the experimental protocol, and the recovery phase. We are also beginning analysis for the construction of the dose response recovery curves from the chronic sleep restriction. We are in the process of manual scoring and analysis of the polysomnographic data.

(3) At the current time we are still analyzing the data and we have not yet fully constructed the dose response recovery curves. Preliminary analysis however supports the hypothesis that as time in bed for sleep increases on the acute intervention night, following chronic sleep restriction, performance on the next day of simulated critical operations is improved in a sleep duration dose-response manner.

(4) Data collection is complete and analysis of the data has commenced. We anticipate submitting several manuscripts to peer review journals this year, which will begin to reveal the relationship between the varying durations of time in bed and recovery of waking neurobehavioral and physiological outcomes, following chronic partial sleep deprivation.

Research Impact/Earth Benefits: The primary aim is to determine the sleep dose-response effects of an acute change in sleep duration that occurs between two periods of chronic sleep restriction, on neurocognitive performance functions, subjective states, and waking and sleep physiology. The experiment will determine the countermeasure benefits for performance (during critical operations and subsequent days of sleep restriction) from an acute increase in sleep duration (i.e., single night of recovery sleep). The knowledge gained has the potential to change work scheduling and further understand the effect of sleep lose and recovery on neurobehavioral function in many Earth-based safety-sensitive occupations, such as transportation workers (e.g., truck drivers, train conductors, airline pilots); operators in safety-sensitive industries (e.g., power plant control rooms); and military personnel.

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2008 
Task Progress: Data collection is now complete. Seventy-two subjects completed the 16 day in-laboratory study protocol (for a total of 1152 laboratory days). We are currently in the process of performing analyses on the data collected. Specifically, we are analyzing the neurobehavioral performance changes across the experimental protocol, and the recovery phase. We are in the process of manual scoring and analysis of the polysomnographic and cardiovascular data. Preliminary data suggests that a single sleep period of 8h, 10h or 12h after 5 nights of 4h sleep, provides substantial acute recovery, but not protection against the immediate reappearance of performance deficits when it is followed by 5 additional nights of sleep restriction.

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 05/20/2022) 

Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
Abstracts for Journals and Proceedings Avery N, Banks S, Dinges DF. "Change in psychomotor vigilance test lapses predicts change in digit-span memory performance during sleep restriction." Sleep 2007. 21st Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies, Minneapolis, MN, June 9-14, 2007.

Sleep. 2007;30 Suppl:A122. , Jun-2007

Abstracts for Journals and Proceedings Avinash D, Banks S, Van Dongen H, Dinges DF. "Slow wave dynamics during consecutive weeks of sleep restriction to 4 hours per day." Sleep 2007. 21st Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies, Minneapolis, MN, June 9-14, 2007.

Sleep. 2007;30 Suppl:A119. , Jun-2007

Abstracts for Journals and Proceedings Banks S, Bergamo C, Dinges DF. "Sleep restriction reduces heart rate variability." Sleep 2007. 21st Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies, Minneapolis, MN, June 9-14, 2007.

Sleep. 2007;30 Suppl:A31. , Jun-2007

Abstracts for Journals and Proceedings Banks S, Van Dongen H, Dinges DF. "Response to sleep restriction depends upon preexisting sleep debt." Sleep 2007. 21st Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies, Minneapolis, MN, June 9-14, 2007.

Sleep. 2007;30 Suppl:A119. , Jun-2007

Abstracts for Journals and Proceedings Caruso H, Banks S, Minkel J, Dinges DF. "Executive functioning following five nights of sleep restriction." Sleep 2007. 21st Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies, Minneapolis, MN, June 9-14, 2007.

Sleep. 2007;30 Suppl:A120. , Jun-2007

Abstracts for Journals and Proceedings Erickson J, Banks S, Dinges DF. "Winscat test battery is partially sensitive to chronic sleep restriction." Sleep 2007. 21st Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies, Minneapolis, MN, June 9-14, 2007.

Sleep. 2007;30 Suppl:A124. , Jun-2007

Abstracts for Journals and Proceedings Goel N, Lakhtman L, Basner M, Banks S, Dinges DF. "Neurobehavioral and cognitive differences during total versus partial sleep deprivation." Sleep 2007. 21st Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies, Minneapolis, MN, June 9-14, 2007.

Sleep. 2007;30 Suppl:A131. , Jun-2007

Abstracts for Journals and Proceedings Goel N, Lakhtman L, Basner M, Banks S, Dinges DF. "Phenotyping neurobehavioral and cognitive responses to partial sleep deprivation." Sleep 2007. 21st Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies, Minneapolis, MN, June 9-14, 2007.

Sleep. 2007;30 Suppl:A130-1. , Jun-2007

Abstracts for Journals and Proceedings Lakhtman L, Banks S, Goel N, Dinges DF. "Synthetic work performance following five nights of sleep restriction." Sleep 2007. 21st Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies, Minneapolis, MN, June 9-14, 2007.

Sleep. 2007;30 Suppl:A120. , Jun-2007

Articles in Peer-reviewed Journals Banks S, Dinges DF. "Behavioral and physiological consequences of sleep restriction." J Clin Sleep Med. 2007 Aug 15;3(5):519-28. PMID: 17803017 , Aug-2007
Awards Dinges DF. "1st Place Computational Modeling Prize for paper on 'Understanding Decrements in Knowledge Access Resulting from Increased Fatigue', The Cognitive Science Society, July 2007." Jul-2007
Awards Dinges DF. "Laurence R. Young Space Biomedical Research Award for contributions to human performance in space, April 2008." Apr-2008
Awards Dinges DF. "NASA Distinguished Public Service Medal, July 2007." Jul-2007
Books/Book Chapters Mallis MM, Banks S, Dinges DF. "Sleep and circadian control of neurobehavioral functions." in "Neuroergonomics : the brain at work." Ed. R. Parasuraman, M. Rizzo. Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2007. p. 207-220., Jul-2007
Project Title:  Countermeasures to neurobehavioral deficits from cumulative sleep deprivation during space flight: Dose-response effects of recovery sleep opportunities Reduce
Fiscal Year: FY 2007 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP BHP:Behavioral Health & Performance (archival in 2017)
Start Date: 06/01/2004  
End Date: 05/31/2008  
Task Last Updated: 10/05/2007 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Dinges, David F. Ph.D. / University of Pennsylvania 
Address:  Department of Psychiatry 
423 Service Dr., 1013 Blockley Hall 
Philadelphia , PA 19104-4209 
Email: dinges@pennmedicine.upenn.edu 
Phone: 215-898-9949  
Congressional District:
Web:  
Organization Type: UNIVERSITY 
Organization Name: University of Pennsylvania 
Joint Agency:  
Comments:  
Co-Investigator(s)
Affiliation: 
Banks, Siobhan  University of Pennsylvania Health System 
Project Information: Grant/Contract No. NCC 9-58-HPF00404 
Responsible Center: NSBRI 
Grant Monitor:  
Center Contact:   
Solicitation / Funding Source: 2003 Biomedical Research & Countermeasures 03-OBPR-04 
Grant/Contract No.: NCC 9-58-HPF00404 
Project Type: GROUND 
Flight Program:  
TechPort: Yes 
No. of Post Docs:
No. of PhD Candidates:
No. of Master's Candidates:
No. of Bachelor's Candidates: 41 
No. of PhD Degrees:
No. of Master's Degrees:
No. of Bachelor's Degrees: 18 
Human Research Program Elements: (1) BHP:Behavioral Health & Performance (archival in 2017)
Human Research Program Risks: (1) Sleep:Risk of Performance Decrements and Adverse Health Outcomes Resulting from Sleep Loss, Circadian Desynchronization, and Work Overload (IRP Rev F)
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) Sleep Gap 09:We need to identify an integrated, individualized suite of countermeasures and protocols for implementing these countermeasures to prevent and/or treat chronic partial sleep loss, work overload, and/or circadian shifting, in spaceflight (IRP Rev E)
Task Description: (1) The overarching goal of this project is to develop sleep schedule countermeasures to ensure optimal neurocognitive performance capability in astronauts during prolonged space flight. The primary aim is to determine the sleep dose-response effects of an acute change in sleep duration that occurs between two periods of chronic sleep restriction, on neurocognitive performance functions, subjective states, and waking and sleep physiology.

The optimal performance of astronauts during extended-duration space flight depends heavily on achieving recovery through adequate sleep. There is now extensive evidence that astronaut sleep in space averages 4 to 6.5 hours per day, and when critical operations (e.g., nighttime docking) are scheduled, very little sleep may be obtained during a day prior to the critical event. Ground-based experiments on healthy adults by our laboratory and others have demonstrated that limiting daily sleep duration to less than 7 hours leads to cumulative deficits in neurocognitive performance and alertness. Within 1-2 weeks of sleep restriction at levels experienced by astronauts, performance deficits were serious; impairments on tasks requiring sustained attention, working memory and cognitive throughput reached levels equivalent to those found after 1-2 nights of total sleep loss.

The experiment will determine the countermeasure benefits for performance (during critical operations and subsequent days of sleep restriction) from an acute increase in sleep duration (i.e., single night of recovery sleep). In addition, generating sleep dose-response functions will provide critically needed information on the adverse performance consequences of an acute reduction in sleep duration below the chronic sleep-restriction level, which can occur in space flight prior to a day of critical operations. We will establish sleep dose-response curves for the immediate and delayed impact on neurobehavioral functions, of an acute (1 night) change in sleep duration midway in a period of chronic sleep restriction. We will determine if performance recovery is complete after 2 nights of extended sleep, following chronic sleep restriction. In addition to the impact of a single night intervention (specific aim 1), we seek to resolve whether complete neurobehavioral recovery from prolonged chronic sleep restriction is possible within 2 nights. We will investigate the relationship between sleep physiology and performance responses. We will investigate the effects of chronic sleep restriction, acute sleep intervention, and recovery sleep on cardiovascular indices.

(2) We are currently in the process of performing preliminary analyses on the data collected. Specifically, we are analyzing the neurobehavioral performance changes across the experimental protocol, and the recovery phase. We are also beginning analysis for the construction of the dose response recovery curves from the chronic sleep restriction. We are in the process of manual scoring and analysis of the polysomnographic data.

(3) At the current time we are still collecting and analyzing the data and we have not yet fully constructed the dose response recovery curves. Preliminary analysis however supports the hypothesis that as time in bed for sleep increases on the acute intervention night, following chronic sleep restriction, performance on the next day of simulated critical operations is improved in a sleep duration dose-response manner.

(4) We will continue with the data collection across the next two years, to complete a total of 80 subjects. The data collected in the coming year will address the specific aims listed above. Data analysis has commenced, and will continue throughout the data collection process. Neuropsychological, performance, mood and sleep quality data collected thus far will be presented at the 21st Annual meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies conference in Minneapolis next June. We anticipate submitting several manuscripts to peer review journals this year, which will begin to reveal the relationship between the varying durations of time in bed and recovery of waking neurobehavioral and physiological outcomes, following chronic partial sleep deprivation.

Research Impact/Earth Benefits: The study focuses the effect of different doses of sleep time on performance and cognition. The knowledge gained has the potential to change work scheduling and further understand the effect of sleep loss and recovery on neurobehavioral function in spaceflight and in many Earth-based safety-sensitive occupations, such as transportation workers (e.g., truck drivers, train conductors, airline pilots); operators in safety-sensitive industries (e.g., power plant control rooms); and military personnel.

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2007 
Task Progress: The project is on schedule and the study is progressing well. Fifty-four subjects have completed the 16 day in-laboratory study protocol (for a total of 864 laboratory days) and we expect to recruit another 20 subject in the coming grant year. We are currently in the process of performing analyses on the data collected. Specifically, we are analyzing the neurobehavioral performance changes across the experimental protocol, and the recovery phase. We are in the process of manual scoring and analysis of the polysomnographic and cardiovascular data. Abstracts based on this work have been accepted for presentation at the 21st Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies, in Minneapolis, examining various aspects of the data. Specifically preliminary construction of a dose response recovery curve from the chronic sleep restriction and investigation of the effect of chronic sleep restriction and recovery on neurobehavioral functions.

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 05/20/2022) 

Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
Abstracts for Journals and Proceedings Banks S, Van Dongen H, Dinges DF. "How much sleep is needed to recover from sleep debt? The impact of sleep dose on recovery." Australasian Sleep Association Meeting, 2006.

Intern Med J. 2006;36: A37. , May-2006

Abstracts for Journals and Proceedings Banks S, Van Dongen H, Dinges DF. "Sleep dose-response study of recovery from sustained sleep restriction." European Sleep Research Society, Innsbruck, Austria, September 12-16, 2006.

J Sleep Res. 2006;15:A145. , Sep-2006

Abstracts for Journals and Proceedings Mc Glinchey EL, Banks S, Minkel JD, Dinges DF. "Effect of chronic sleep restriction on pre-frontal cortex functioning and its relationship to IQ and personality." Australasian Sleep Association Meeting, 2006.

Intern Med J. 2006;36: A37. , May-2006

Abstracts for Journals and Proceedings Mc Glinchey EL, Banks S, Minkel JD, Dinges DF. "Effect of introversion-extroversion on mood during chronic sleep restriction." Associated Professional Sleep Societies 20th Annual Meeting, Salt Lake City, Utah, June 17-20, 2006.

Sleep, 2006;29(Suppl):A378. , Jun-2006

Articles in Peer-reviewed Journals Mollicone DJ, Van Dongen HPA, Dinges DF. "Optimizing sleep/wake schedules in space: Sleep during chronic nocturnal sleep restriction with and without diurnal naps." Acta Astronaut. 2007 Feb-Apr;60(4-7):354-61. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.actaastro.2006.09.022 , Feb-2007
Awards Dinges DF. "Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions by Alumnae, Department of Psychology, Saint Louis University, July 2006." Jul-2006
Project Title:  Countermeasures to neurobehavioral deficits from cumulative sleep deprivation during space flight: Dose-response effects of recovery sleep opportunities Reduce
Fiscal Year: FY 2006 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP BHP:Behavioral Health & Performance (archival in 2017)
Start Date: 06/01/2004  
End Date: 05/31/2008  
Task Last Updated: 01/08/2007 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Dinges, David F. Ph.D. / University of Pennsylvania 
Address:  Department of Psychiatry 
423 Service Dr., 1013 Blockley Hall 
Philadelphia , PA 19104-4209 
Email: dinges@pennmedicine.upenn.edu 
Phone: 215-898-9949  
Congressional District:
Web:  
Organization Type: UNIVERSITY 
Organization Name: University of Pennsylvania 
Joint Agency:  
Comments:  
Co-Investigator(s)
Affiliation: 
Banks, Siobhan  University of Pennsylvania Health System 
Project Information: Grant/Contract No. NCC 9-58-HPF00404 
Responsible Center: NSBRI 
Grant Monitor:  
Center Contact:   
Solicitation / Funding Source: 2003 Biomedical Research & Countermeasures 03-OBPR-04 
Grant/Contract No.: NCC 9-58-HPF00404 
Project Type: GROUND 
Flight Program:  
TechPort: Yes 
No. of Post Docs:
No. of PhD Candidates:
No. of Master's Candidates:
No. of Bachelor's Candidates: 39 
No. of PhD Degrees:
No. of Master's Degrees:
No. of Bachelor's Degrees: 94 
Human Research Program Elements: (1) BHP:Behavioral Health & Performance (archival in 2017)
Human Research Program Risks: (1) Sleep:Risk of Performance Decrements and Adverse Health Outcomes Resulting from Sleep Loss, Circadian Desynchronization, and Work Overload (IRP Rev F)
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) Sleep Gap 09:We need to identify an integrated, individualized suite of countermeasures and protocols for implementing these countermeasures to prevent and/or treat chronic partial sleep loss, work overload, and/or circadian shifting, in spaceflight (IRP Rev E)
Task Description: (1) The overarching goal of this project is to develop sleep schedule countermeasures to ensure optimal neurocognitive performance capability in astronauts during prolonged space flight. The primary aim is to determine the sleep dose-response effects of an acute change in sleep duration that occurs between two periods of chronic sleep restriction, on neurocognitive performance functions, subjective states, and waking and sleep physiology.

The optimal performance of astronauts during extended-duration space flight depends heavily on achieving recovery through adequate sleep. There is now extensive evidence that astronaut sleep in space averages 4 to 6.5 hours per day, and when critical operations (e.g., nighttime docking) are scheduled, very little sleep may be obtained during a day prior to the critical event. Ground-based experiments on healthy adults by our laboratory and others have demonstrated that limiting daily sleep duration to less than 7 hours leads to cumulative deficits in neurocognitive performance and alertness. Within 1-2 weeks of sleep restriction at levels experienced by astronauts, performance deficits were serious; impairments on tasks requiring sustained attention, working memory and cognitive throughput reached levels equivalent to those found after 1-2 nights of total sleep loss.

The experiment will determine the countermeasure benefits for performance (during critical operations and subsequent days of sleep restriction) from an acute increase in sleep duration (i.e., single night of recovery sleep). In addition, generating sleep dose-response functions will provide critically needed information on the adverse performance consequences of an acute reduction in sleep duration below the chronic sleep-restriction level, which can occur in space flight prior to a day of critical operations. We will establish sleep dose-response curves for the immediate and delayed impact on neurobehavioral functions, of an acute (1 night) change in sleep duration midway in a period of chronic sleep restriction. We will determine if performance recovery is complete after 2 nights of extended sleep, following chronic sleep restriction. In addition to the impact of a single night intervention (specific aim 1), we seek to resolve whether complete neurobehavioral recovery from prolonged chronic sleep restriction is possible within 2 nights. We will investigate the relationship between sleep physiology and performance responses. We will investigate the effects of chronic sleep restriction, acute sleep intervention, and recovery sleep on cardiovascular indices. (2) We are currently in the process of performing preliminary analyses on the data collected. Specifically, we are analyzing the neurobehavioral performance changes across the experimental protocol, and the recovery phase. We are also beginning analysis for the construction of the dose response recovery curves from the chronic sleep restriction. We are in the process of manual scoring and analysis of the polysomnographic data.

(3) At the current time we are still collecting and analyzing the data and we have not yet fully constructed the dose response recovery curves. Preliminary analysis however supports the hypothesis that as time in bed for sleep increases on the acute intervention night, following chronic sleep restriction, performance on the next day of simulated critical operations is improved in a sleep duration dose-response manner.

(4) We will continue with the data collection across the next two years, to complete a total of 80 subjects. The data collected in the coming year will address the specific aims listed above. Data analysis has commenced, and will continue throughout the data collection process. Neuropsychological, performance, mood and sleep quality data collected thus far will be presented at the 20th Annual meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies conference in Salt Lake City next June. We anticipate submitting several manuscripts to peer review journals next year, which will begin to reveal the relationship between the varying durations of time in bed and recovery of waking neurobehavioral and physiological outcomes, following chronic partial sleep deprivation.

Research Impact/Earth Benefits: The primary aim is to determine the sleep dose-response effects of an acute change in sleep duration that occurs between two periods of chronic sleep restriction, on neurocognitive performance functions, subjective states, and waking and sleep physiology. The experiment will determine the countermeasure benefits for performance (during critical operations and subsequent days of sleep restriction) from an acute increase in sleep duration (i.e., single night of recovery sleep). The knowledge gained has the potential to change work scheduling and further understand the effect of sleep lose and recovery on neurobehavioral function in many Earth-based safety-sensitive occupations, such as transportation workers (e.g., truck drivers, train conductors, airline pilots); operators in safety-sensitive industries (e.g., power plant control rooms); and military personnel.

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2006 
Task Progress: The project is on schedule and the study is progressing well. Thirty-two subjects have completed the 16 day in-laboratory study protocol (for a total of 512 laboratory days) and we expect to recruit another 20 subject in the coming grant year. We are currently in the process of performing analyses on the data collected. Specifically, we are analyzing the neurobehavioral performance changes across the experimental protocol, and the recovery phase. We are in the process of manual scoring and analysis of the polysomnographic data. Abstracts based on this work have been accepted for presentation at the 20th Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies, in Salt Lake City, Utah examining various aspects of the data. Specifically preliminary construction of a dose response recovery curve from the chronic sleep restriction and investigation of the effect of chronic sleep restriction and recovery on neurobehavioral functions.

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 05/20/2022) 

Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
Abstracts for Journals and Proceedings Baffy NJ, Banks S, Dinges DF. "Food cravings: Chronic sleep restriction and mood." Associated Professional Sleep Societies 19th Annual Meeting, Denver, Colorado, June 18-23, 2005.

Sleep. 2005;28 Suppl:A386. , Jun-2005

Abstracts for Journals and Proceedings Banks, S, Van Dongen H, Dinges DF. "How much sleep is needed to recover from sleep debt? The impact of sleep dose on recovery." Associated Professional Sleep Societies 19th Annual Meeting, Denver, Colorado, June 18-23, 2005.

Sleep. 2005;28 Suppl:A407. , Jun-2005

Abstracts for Journals and Proceedings Censits DM, Banks S, Dinges DF. "Discrepancy between self-report and objective measurements of sleepiness: Which people do not realize they are sleepy?" Associated Professional Sleep Societies 19th Annual Meeting, Denver, Colorado, June 18-23, 2005.

Sleep. 2005;28 Suppl:A1028. , Jun-2005

Abstracts for Journals and Proceedings Dinges DF, Banks S, Mollicone D, Maislin G, Rogers NL,Van Dongen, H. "Sleep schedule countermeasures to cumulative partial sleep loss in space flight." Habitation meeting, January 2006.

Habitation. International Journal for Human Support Research. 2006;10:(3/4). , Jan-2006

Abstracts for Journals and Proceedings Dinges DF, O Connor R, Van Dongen H. "Detecting state instability: Why PVT performance is so sensitive to sleep loss." Associated Professional Sleep Societies 19th Annual Meeting, Denver, Colorado, June 18-23, 2005.

Sleep. 2005;28 Suppl:A379. , Jun-2005

Abstracts for Journals and Proceedings Gorman RL, Banks S, Dinges DF. "Effect of partial sleep deprivation and recovery sleep dose on the Spaceflight Cognitive Assessment Tool (WinSCAT)." Associated Professional Sleep Societies 19th Annual Meeting, Denver, Colorado, June 18-23, 2005.

Sleep. 2005;28 Suppl:A1043. , Jun-2005

Abstracts for Journals and Proceedings McGlinchey EL, Banks S, Minkle JD, Dinges DF. "Effect of chronic sleep restriction on pre-frontal cortex functioning and its relationship to IQ and personality." Associated Professional Sleep Societies 19th Annual Meeting, Denver, Colorado, June 18-23, 2005.

Sleep. 2005;28 Suppl:A1029. , Jun-2005

Abstracts for Journals and Proceedings Minkel JD, Banks S, Mc Glinchey EL, Dinges DF. "Relationships among mood and neurocognitive tasks after five nights of partial sleep deprivation." Associated Professional Sleep Societies 19th Annual Meeting, Denver, Colorado, June 18-23, 2005.

Sleep. 2005;28 Suppl:A380. , Jun-2005

Abstracts for Journals and Proceedings Razavi F, Banks S, Dinges DF. "Effects of sleep restriction and recovery sleep on driving simulator test (AusEd) performance." Associated Professional Sleep Societies 19th Annual Meeting, Denver, Colorado, June 18-23, 2005.

Sleep. 2005;28 Suppl:A384. , Jun-2005

Articles in Peer-reviewed Journals Rogers NL, Dinges DF. "Caffeine: Implications for alertness in athletes." Clin Sports Med. 2005 Apr;24(2):e1-13, x-xi. Review. PMID: 15892913 , Apr-2005
Articles in Peer-reviewed Journals Van Dongen HP, Dinges DF. "Sleep, circadian rhythms, and psychomotor vigilance." Clin Sports Med. 2005 Apr;24(2):237-49, vii-viii. Review. PMID: 15892921 , Apr-2005
Books/Book Chapters Dinges DF, Baynard M, Rogers NL. "Chronic Sleep Restriction." in "Principles and Practice of Sleep Medicine, 4th Edition." Ed. M.H. Kryger, T. Roth, W.C. Dement. Philadelphia : Elsevier/Saunders, c2005., Nov-2005
Books/Book Chapters Dorrian J, Dinges DF. "Sleep deprivation and its effects on cognitive performance." in "Sleep : a comprehensive handbook." Ed. T. Lee-Chiong. Hoboken, NJ : Wiley-Liss, c2006., Jan-2006
Books/Book Chapters Dorrian J, Rogers NL, Dinges DF. "Psychomotor vigilance performance: A neurocognitive assay sensitive to sleep loss." in "Sleep deprivation : clinical issues, pharmacology, and sleep loss effects." Ed. C. Kushida. New York : Marcel Dekker, c2005., Jan-2005
Books/Book Chapters Van Dongen HPA, Dinges DF. "Circadian Rhythm in Sleepiness, Alertness and Performance." in "Principles and Practice of Sleep Medicine, 4th Edition." Ed. M.H. Kryger, T. Roth, W.C. Dement. Philadelphia : Elsevier/Saunders, c2005., Nov-2005
Project Title:  Countermeasures to neurobehavioral deficits from cumulative sleep deprivation during space flight: Dose-response effects of recovery sleep opportunities Reduce
Fiscal Year: FY 2005 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP BHP:Behavioral Health & Performance (archival in 2017)
Start Date: 06/01/2004  
End Date: 05/31/2008  
Task Last Updated: 06/22/2005 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Dinges, David F. Ph.D. / University of Pennsylvania 
Address:  Department of Psychiatry 
423 Service Dr., 1013 Blockley Hall 
Philadelphia , PA 19104-4209 
Email: dinges@pennmedicine.upenn.edu 
Phone: 215-898-9949  
Congressional District:
Web:  
Organization Type: UNIVERSITY 
Organization Name: University of Pennsylvania 
Joint Agency:  
Comments:  
Co-Investigator(s)
Affiliation: 
VanDongen, Hans  University of Pennsylvania Health System 
Rogers, Naomi  University of Pennsylvania 
Project Information: Grant/Contract No. NCC 9-58-HPF00404 
Responsible Center: NSBRI 
Grant Monitor:  
Center Contact:   
Solicitation / Funding Source: 2003 Biomedical Research & Countermeasures 03-OBPR-04 
Grant/Contract No.: NCC 9-58-HPF00404 
Project Type: GROUND 
Flight Program:  
TechPort: Yes 
No. of Post Docs:
No. of PhD Candidates:
No. of Master's Candidates:
No. of Bachelor's Candidates: 39 
No. of PhD Degrees:
No. of Master's Degrees:
No. of Bachelor's Degrees: 39 
Human Research Program Elements: (1) BHP:Behavioral Health & Performance (archival in 2017)
Human Research Program Risks: (1) Sleep:Risk of Performance Decrements and Adverse Health Outcomes Resulting from Sleep Loss, Circadian Desynchronization, and Work Overload (IRP Rev F)
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) Sleep Gap 09:We need to identify an integrated, individualized suite of countermeasures and protocols for implementing these countermeasures to prevent and/or treat chronic partial sleep loss, work overload, and/or circadian shifting, in spaceflight (IRP Rev E)
Task Description: (1) The overarching goal of this project is to develop sleep schedule countermeasures to ensure optimal neurocognitive performance capability in astronauts during prolonged space flight. The primary aim is to determine the sleep dose-response effects of an acute change in sleep duration that occurs between two periods of chronic sleep restriction, on neurocognitive performance functions, subjective states, and waking and sleep physiology.

The optimal performance of astronauts during extended-duration space flight depends heavily on achieving recovery through adequate sleep. There is now extensive evidence that astronaut sleep in space averages 4 to 6.5 hours per day, and when critical operations (e.g., nighttime docking) are scheduled, very little sleep may be obtained during a day prior to the critical event. Ground-based experiments on healthy adults by our laboratory and others have demonstrated that limiting daily sleep duration to less than 7 hours leads to cumulative deficits in neurocognitive performance and alertness. Within 1-2 weeks of sleep restriction at levels experienced by astronauts, performance deficits were serious; impairments on tasks requiring sustained attention, working memory and cognitive throughput reached levels equivalent to those found after 1-2 nights of total sleep loss.

The experiment will determine the countermeasure benefits for performance (during critical operations and subsequent days of sleep restriction) from an acute increase in sleep duration (i.e., single night of recovery sleep). In addition, generating sleep dose-response functions will provide critically needed information on the adverse performance consequences of an acute reduction in sleep duration below the chronic sleep-restriction level, which can occur in space flight prior to a day of critical operations. We will establish sleep dose-response curves for the immediate and delayed impact on neurobehavioral functions, of an acute (1 night) change in sleep duration midway in a period of chronic sleep restriction. We will determine if performance recovery is complete after 2 nights of extended sleep, following chronic sleep restriction. In addition to the impact of a single night intervention (specific aim 1), we seek to resolve whether complete neurobehavioral recovery from prolonged chronic sleep restriction is possible within 2 nights. We will investigate the relationship between sleep physiology and performance responses. We will investigate the effects of chronic sleep restriction, acute sleep intervention, and recovery sleep on cardiovascular indices. (2) We are currently in the process of performing preliminary analyses on the data collected. Specifically, we are analyzing the neurobehavioral performance changes across the experimental protocol, and the recovery phase. We are also beginning the preliminary analysis for construction of the dose response recovery curves from the chronic sleep restriction. We are in the process of manual scoring and analysis of the polysomnographic data.

(3) At the current time we are still collecting and analyzing the data and we have not yet fully constructed the dose response recovery curves. Preliminary analysis however supports the hypothesis that as time in bed for sleep increases on the acute intervention night, following chronic sleep restriction, performance on the next day of simulated critical operations is improved in a sleep duration dose-response manner.

(4) We will continue with the data collection across the next three years, to complete a total of 80 subjects. The data collected in the coming year will address the specific aims listed above. Data analysis has commenced, and will continue throughout the data collection process. Neuropsychological, performance, mood and sleep quality data collected thus far will be presented at the 19th Annual meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies conference in Denver next June. We anticipate submitting several manuscripts to peer review journals next year, which will begin to reveal the relationship between the varying durations of time in bed and recovery of waking neurobehavioral and physiological outcomes, following chronic partial sleep deprivation.

Research Impact/Earth Benefits: The primary aim is to determine the sleep dose-response effects of an acute change in sleep duration that occurs between two periods of chronic sleep restriction, on neurocognitive performance functions, subjective states, and waking and sleep physiology. The experiment will determine the countermeasure benefits for performance (during critical operations and subsequent days of sleep restriction) from an acute increase in sleep duration (i.e., single night of recovery sleep). The knowledge gained has the potential to change work scheduling and further understand the effect of sleep lose and recovery on neurobehavioral function in many Earth-based safety-sensitive occupations, such as transportation workers (e.g., truck drivers, train conductors, airline pilots); operators in safety-sensitive industries (e.g., power plant control rooms); and military personnel.

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2005 
Task Progress: The project is on schedule and the study is progressing well. Twenty subjects have completed the 16 day in-laboratory study protocol (for a total of 320 laboratory days) and we expect to recruit another 20 subject in the coming grant year. We are currently in the process of performing preliminary analyses on the data collected. Specifically, we are analyzing the neurobehavioral performance changes across the experimental protocol, and the recovery phase. We are in the process of manual scoring and analysis of the polysomnographic data. Abstracts based on this work have been accepted for presentation at the 19th Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies, in Denver, Colorado examining various aspects of the data. Specifically preliminary construction of a dose response recovery curve from the chronic sleep restriction and investigation of the effect of chronic sleep restriction and recovery on neurobehavioral functions.

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 05/20/2022) 

Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
Articles in Peer-reviewed Journals Durmer JS, Dinges DF. "Neurocognitive consequences of sleep deprivation." Semin Neurol. 2005 Mar;25(1):117-29. PMID: 15798944 , Mar-2005
Awards Dinges DF. " David F. Dinges: Recipient of the Decade of Behavior Research Award, American Psychological Association, 2005. " Jan-2005
Awards Dinges DF. " David F. Dinges: Recipient of the William C. Dement Academic Achievement Award, American Academy of Sleep Medicine, 2005. " Jan-2005
Awards Dinges DF. " David F. Dinges: The 39th Harry G. Armstrong Lecture at the 75th Annual Aviation Space Medicine Association scientific meeting, Anchorage, AK, May 2005." May-2005
Books/Book Chapters Dorrian J, Rogers NL, Dinges DF. "Psychomotor vigilance performance: A neurocognitive assay sensitive to sleep loss." in "Sleep Deprivation: Clinical Issues, Pharmacology, and Sleep Loss Effects." Ed. C.A. Kushida. New York : Marcel Dekker, c2005., Jan-2005
Books/Book Chapters Mallis MM, Banks S, Dinges DF. "Sleep and circadian control of neurobehavioral function." in "Neuroergonomics: The Brain at Work." Ed. R. Parasuraman, M. Rizzo. New York : Oxford University Press, 2006., Jan-2006
Presentation Dinges, D. F. "Sleep loss and its neurocognitive consequences " Nov-2004
Presentation Dinges, D. F. "Testing theoretical predictions on the neurobehavioral effects of sleep loss in humans " Jun-2004
Presentation Dinges, D. F. "Vigilance in a 24/7 world: II. Countermeasures for fatigue. " Oct-2004
Project Title:  Countermeasures to neurobehavioral deficits from cumulative sleep deprivation during space flight: Dose-response effects of recovery sleep opportunities Reduce
Fiscal Year: FY 2004 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP BHP:Behavioral Health & Performance (archival in 2017)
Start Date: 06/01/2004  
End Date: 05/31/2008  
Task Last Updated: 03/23/2006 
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Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Dinges, David F. Ph.D. / University of Pennsylvania 
Address:  Department of Psychiatry 
423 Service Dr., 1013 Blockley Hall 
Philadelphia , PA 19104-4209 
Email: dinges@pennmedicine.upenn.edu 
Phone: 215-898-9949  
Congressional District:
Web:  
Organization Type: UNIVERSITY 
Organization Name: University of Pennsylvania 
Joint Agency:  
Comments:  
Project Information: Grant/Contract No. NCC 9-58-HPF00404 
Responsible Center: NSBRI 
Grant Monitor:  
Center Contact:   
Solicitation / Funding Source: 2003 Biomedical Research & Countermeasures 03-OBPR-04 
Grant/Contract No.: NCC 9-58-HPF00404 
Project Type: GROUND 
Flight Program:  
TechPort: Yes 
No. of Post Docs:  
No. of PhD Candidates:  
No. of Master's Candidates:  
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:  
No. of PhD Degrees:  
No. of Master's Degrees:  
No. of Bachelor's Degrees:  
Human Research Program Elements: (1) BHP:Behavioral Health & Performance (archival in 2017)
Human Research Program Risks: (1) Sleep:Risk of Performance Decrements and Adverse Health Outcomes Resulting from Sleep Loss, Circadian Desynchronization, and Work Overload (IRP Rev F)
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) Sleep Gap 09:We need to identify an integrated, individualized suite of countermeasures and protocols for implementing these countermeasures to prevent and/or treat chronic partial sleep loss, work overload, and/or circadian shifting, in spaceflight (IRP Rev E)
Task Description: The optimal performance of astronauts during extended-duration space flight depends heavily on achieving recovery through adequate sleep. This project will develop sleep schedule countermeasures to ensure neurocognitive performance capability in astronauts during prolonged space flight. Sleep is chronically restricted in space to 4h-6h per day for reasons often associated with operational requirements. Ground-based studies reveal that such chronic sleep durations result in cumulative performance impairments. The proposed experiment will establish the countermeasure benefits for performance from an acute increase in recovery sleep duration that occurs between two periods of chronic sleep restriction. In addition, generating sleep dose-response functions will provide needed information on the adverse performance consequences of an acute reduction in sleep duration, which can occur in space flight prior to a day of critical operations. A sleep-duration, dose-response experimental approach with randomization to condition will be carried out on N=80 healthy adults (n=40 females; n=40 males). Sleep duration dose will be varied parametrically on one night (0h, 2h, 4h, 6h, 8h, 10h, or 12h), placed midway between two 6-night periods of chronic sleep restriction (4h/night). The resulting dose response curves will quantify, for the first time, the degree of recuperation and/or further decrement of neurobehavioral functions relative to varying amounts of sleep following a period of cumulative sleep loss. In addition, we will resolve whether complete neurobehavioral recovery from chronic sleep restriction is possible within two nights of extended sleep duration. Subjects will be monitored for a wide range of neurobehavioral performance functions, fatigue and mood states, waking EEG, core body temperature, behavioral motility, cardiovascular activity and sleep PSG, while living for 17 days in a laboratory setting that simulates the low light, tight quarters and lack of social contact with the outside world, characterizing long-duration space flight. The results have the potential to fill critical gaps in scientific understanding of the impact of sleep duration on recovery from prior chronic sleep debt; inform and enrich biomathematical models of performance in space flight; and help identify the importance of the strategic use of periodic recovery sleep durations in the many Earth-based occupations in which chronic sleep loss poses a risk to health and safety.

Research Impact/Earth Benefits:

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2004 
Task Progress: New project for FY2004.

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 05/20/2022) 

Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
 None in FY 2004