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Project Title:  Habitability and Human Factors Assessment in CHAPEA (iSHORT, SHAQ and SHU) Reduce
Images: icon  Fiscal Year: FY 2023 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP HFBP:Human Factors & Behavioral Performance (IRP Rev H)
Start Date: 10/04/2022  
End Date: 10/04/2027  
Task Last Updated: 12/06/2022 
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Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Landon, Lauren Blackwell Ph.D. / KBR/NASA Johnson Space Center 
Address:  2101 NASA Parkway B21 
 
Houston , TX 77058 
Email: lauren.landon@nasa.gov  
Phone: 281-483-9247  
Congressional District: 36 
Web:  
Organization Type: NASA CENTER 
Organization Name: KBR/NASA Johnson Space Center 
Joint Agency:  
Comments:  
Co-Investigator(s)
Affiliation: 
Bell, Suzanne  Ph.D. NASA Johnson Space Center 
Robertson, Ian  Ph.D. KBR/NASA Johnson Space Center 
Project Information: Grant/Contract No. Directed Research 
Responsible Center: NASA JSC 
Grant Monitor: Whitmire, Alexandra  
Center Contact:  
alexandra.m.whitmire@nasa.gov 
Unique ID: 15191 
Solicitation / Funding Source: Directed Research 
Grant/Contract No.: Directed Research 
Project Type: GROUND 
Flight Program:  
TechPort: No 
No. of Post Docs:  
No. of PhD Candidates:  
No. of Master's Candidates:  
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:  
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No. of Master's Degrees:  
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Human Research Program Elements: (1) HFBP:Human Factors & Behavioral Performance (IRP Rev H)
Human Research Program Risks: (1) Bmed:Risk of Adverse Behavioral Conditions and Psychiatric Disorders
(2) HSIA:Risk of Adverse Outcome Due to Inadequate Human Systems Integration Architecture (IRP Rev L)
(3) Sleep:Risk of Performance Decrements and Adverse Health Outcomes Resulting from Sleep Loss, Circadian Desynchronization, and Work Overload (IRP Rev F)
(4) Team:Risk of Performance and Behavioral Health Decrements Due to Inadequate Cooperation, Coordination, Communication, and Psychosocial Adaptation within a Team (IRP Rev F)
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) BMed-104:Given the potentially negative spaceflight associated CNS changes and behavioral experiences of stressors during long-duration missions (e.g., isolation, confinement, reduced sensory stimulation, altered gravity, space radiation), what are validated modifications to habitat/vehicle to mitigate stressors impacting on CNS / cognition / behavioral health? (IRP Rev L)
(2) BMed-108:Given each crewmember will experience multiple spaceflight hazards simultaneously, we need to identify and characterize the potential additive, antagonistic, or synergistic impacts of multiple stressors (e.g., space radiation, altered gravity, isolation, altered immune, altered sleep) on crew health and/or CNS/ cognitive functioning to develop threshold limits and validate countermeasures for any identified adverse crew health and/or operationally-relevant performance outcomes (IRP Rev L)
(3) HSIA-101:We need to identify the Human Systems Integration (HSI) – relevant crew health and performance outcomes, measures, and metrics, needed to characterize and mitigate risk, for future exploration missions (IRP Rev L)
(4) HSIA-201:We need to evaluate the demands of future exploration habitat/vehicle systems and mission scenarios (e.g. increased automation, multi-modal communication) on individuals and teams, and determine the risks these demands pose to crew health and performance (IRP Rev L)
(5) HSIA-401:We need to determine how HSI can be applied in the vehicle/habitat and computer interface Design Phase to mitigate potential decrements in operationally-relevant performance (e.g. problem-solving, execution procedures), during increasingly earth-independent, future exploration missions (including in-mission and at landing) (IRP Rev L)
(6) HSIA-801:Given each crewmember will experience multiple spaceflight hazards (e.g. radiation, isolation and confinement, altered gravity), we need to evaluate and identify how HSI can further characterize and/or mitigate additive and/or synergistic effects of the spaceflight environment, for increasingly earth-independent, future exploration missions (including in-mission and at landing) (IRP Rev L)
(7) Sleep-101:Given each crew member will experience multiple spaceflight hazards simultaneously, we need to identify and characterize the potential additive, antagonistic, or synergistic impacts of multiple stressors (e.g., Space Radiation, Altered Gravity, Isolation, altered immune, altered sleep) on crew sleep-wake cycles and/or circadian shifting, health and/or CNS/cognitive functioning to identify any identified adverse individual or team crew health, and/or operationally-relevant performance outcomes (IRP Rev L)
(8) Team-101:We need to understand the key threats, indicators, and evolution of the team throughout its life cycle for shifting autonomy and interface with automation in increasingly earth independent, long duration exploration missions (IRP Rev L)
(9) Team-102:We need to identify a set of quantifiable and validated measures, based on 5-12 key indicators of mission-relevant and identified spaceflight acceptable thresholds (or ranges) of team function, to effectively monitor and measure team health and performance of integrated NASA and commercial/private crews, during shifting autonomy in increasingly earth independent, long duration exploration missions (IRP Rev L)
(10) Team-106:We need to identify how multiple risks (e.g., BMed, HSIA, Sleep) may increase or buffer Team risk, with potential for integrated, synergistic impact on Team performance and functioning during shifting levels of autonomy for all phases of increasingly earth independent, long duration exploration missions (IRP Rev L)
Task Description: The Crew Health and Performance Exploration Analog (CHAPEA) study will examine the impact of the food system, food acceptability, and menu fatigue on multiple individual and team behavioral health and performance outcomes – including cognition, operational task performance, mood and behavioral health, and team and social functioning. iSHORT (Space Habitability Observation Reporting Tool) was previously used to collect detailed data about habitability and human factors on the International Space Station (ISS) to inform NASA Standards (Greene, Thaxton, & Adolf, 2018, report to NASA Human Factors & Behavioral Performance (HFBP) Element) and to demonstrate the iSHORT tool. New data collected in CHAPEA will also inform human factors design and NASA Standards. CHAPEA data will be from three, 1-year missions in the same analog habitat. In the previous iSHORT study, only 1 of the 6 ISS subjects had a duration of 1-year; all other ISS and ground analog subjects had mission durations from 1 week up to 6 months. iSHORT will also include semi-structured prompts to elicit crewmembers’ reflections on key concerns of Human Factors (HF) design and behavioral health. The data collected with the iSHORT tool will be compared to and complement data collected with the SHAQ (Subjective Habitability and Acceptability Questionnaire; Roma, Landon, et al., 2022) tool, which was developed by the Behavioral Health and Performance (BHP) Lab and will be deployed in CHAPEA. Additionally, this mission will allow Human Factor experts to field test a new tool, the Scale for Habitat Usability (SHU), which is the first step for transitioning to operations (ops). The SHU is a brief subjective scale which captures important elements of how habitat design impacts task performance.

The aim of the Habitability and Human Factors Assessment (HHFA) in CHAPEA is to capture HF design concerns and related BHP impacts in a high-fidelity spaceflight analog. iSHORT captures crewmembers’ thoughts, positive and negative, about different habitat points of interest (POI) (i.e., habitat areas, activities, key equipment). Crew will reflect on each habitat POIs multiple times during the mission, which enables better understanding of the change in acceptability over time. We will compare results between the 3 mission crews to understand how individual well-being and team dynamics may be related to human factors concerns over time.

Rationale for HRP Directed Research: This proposal qualifies for a directed study due to the urgent, time-sensitive need to provide “standard measures” as the foundation to achieve consistent research measures and to meet the highly constrained, operationally focused data gathering and analysis that allows for greater consistency in the research methods that are very specific to NASA Human Research Program (HRP) standard measures development. The comparison and complementary understanding of the 3 habitability and human factors measures in this study will allow efficient implementation of the measures in analogs and/or spaceflight in near-term research. Additionally, the directed nature of this study also allows the BHP Laboratory and the Human Factors Engineering Laboratory to provide the unique research and support expertise required to integrate and manage the data from the various participating studies to achieve HRP’s intent. Access to the BHP Laboratory’s HFBP-Exploration Measures (EM) database and vetting of the evidence-based standards makes the solicitation process prohibitive.

Research Impact/Earth Benefits:

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2023 
Task Progress: New project for FY2023.

Bibliography: Description: (Last Updated: ) 

Show Cumulative Bibliography
 
 None in FY 2023