Menu

 

The NASA Task Book
Advanced Search     

Project Title:  Temporal Nature of Cognitive and Visuospatial Brain Domain Changes During Long-Duration Low-Earth Orbit Missions Reduce
Images: icon  Fiscal Year: FY 2022 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP HFBP:Human Factors & Behavioral Performance (IRP Rev H)
Start Date: 06/01/2019  
End Date: 12/31/2027  
Task Last Updated: 03/03/2022 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Basner, Mathias  M.D., Ph.D. / University of Pennsylvania 
Address:  Department of Psychiatry, Division of Sleep and Chronobiology 
423 Service Dr, 1013 Blockley Hall 
Philadelphia , PA 19104-4209 
Email: basner@pennmedicine.upenn.edu 
Phone: 215-573-5866  
Congressional District:
Web:  
Organization Type: UNIVERSITY 
Organization Name: University of Pennsylvania 
Joint Agency:  
Comments:  
Co-Investigator(s)
Affiliation: 
Dinges, David  Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania 
Gunga, Hanns-Christian  M.D. Charite - Universitatsmedizin Berlin, Germany 
Gur, Ruben  Ph.D. The Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania 
Hartley, Tom  Ph.D. University of York, United Kingdom 
Kuehn, Simone  Ph.D. Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Berlin, Germany 
Moore, Tyler  Ph.D. Trustees of Tufts College 
Riecke, Bernhard  Ph.D. Simon Fraser University, Canada 
Roalf, David  Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania 
Wolbers, Thomas  Ph.D. German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, Germany 
Stahn, Alexander  Ph.D. Charite - Universitatsmedizin Berlin, Germany (University of Pennsylvania) 
Bell, Suzanne  NASA 
Whiting, Sara  NASA 
Project Information: Grant/Contract No. 80NSSC19K1046 
Responsible Center: NASA JSC 
Grant Monitor: Whitmire, Alexandra  
Center Contact:  
alexandra.m.whitmire@nasa.gov 
Solicitation / Funding Source: 2017-2018 HERO 80JSC017N0001-BPBA Topics in Biological, Physiological, and Behavioral Adaptations to Spaceflight. Appendix C 
Grant/Contract No.: 80NSSC19K1046 
Project Type: FLIGHT 
Flight Program:  
TechPort: No 
No. of Post Docs:
No. of PhD Candidates:
No. of Master's Candidates:
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:
No. of PhD Degrees:
No. of Master's Degrees:
No. of Bachelor's Degrees:
Human Research Program Elements: (1) HFBP:Human Factors & Behavioral Performance (IRP Rev H)
Human Research Program Risks: (1) Bmed:Risk of Adverse Behavioral Conditions and Psychiatric Disorders
(2) Sensorimotor:Risk of Altered Sensorimotor/Vestibular Function Impacting Critical Mission Tasks (Revised as of IRP Rev M)
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) BMed-101:We need to identify, quantify, and validate the key selection factors for astronaut cognitive and behavioral strengths (e.g., resiliency) and operationally-relevant performance threats for increasingly Earth independent, long-duration, autonomous, and/or long-distance exploration missions (IRP Rev L)
(2) BMed-102:Given exposures to spaceflight hazards (space radiation, isolation), how do we identify individual susceptibility, monitor molecular/biomarkers and acceptable thresholds, and validate behavioral health and CNS/neurological/neuropsychological performance measures and domains of relevance to exploration class missions? (IRP Rev L)
(3) BMed-103:What are the validated, efficacious treatments (individual or Team-based) and/or countermeasures to prevent adverse behavioral conditions, CNS/neurological, and/or psychiatric disorders caused by either single and/or integrated exposures to spaceflight hazards during exploration class missions? (IRP Rev L)
(4) BMed-104:Given the potentially negative spaceflight associated CNS changes and behavioral experiences of stressors during long-duration missions (e.g., isolation, confinement, reduced sensory stimulation, altered gravity, space radiation), what are validated modifications to habitat/vehicle to mitigate stressors impacting on CNS / cognition / behavioral health? (IRP Rev L)
(5) BMed-105:Given the potentially negative spaceflight associated CNS/cognitive changes and behavioral experiences of stressors during long-duration missions (e.g., isolation, confinement, reduced sensory stimulation, altered gravity, space radiation), what are validated medical or dietary countermeasures to mitigate stressors impacting on CNS / cognition / behavioral health? (IRP Rev L)
(6) BMed-107:What are the long-term changes and risks to astronaut health post-mission that, when using a continuity of care model, helps retrospectively identify and understand individual susceptibility (e.g., hereditary, dose, thresholds) to mitigate adverse CNS, cognitive, and behavioral health changes resulting from long-duration exploration missions, promoting the behavioral health of current and future crews? (IRP Rev L)
(7) BMed-108:Given each crewmember will experience multiple spaceflight hazards simultaneously, we need to identify and characterize the potential additive, antagonistic, or synergistic impacts of multiple stressors (e.g., space radiation, altered gravity, isolation, altered immune, altered sleep) on crew health and/or CNS/ cognitive functioning to develop threshold limits and validate countermeasures for any identified adverse crew health and/or operationally-relevant performance outcomes (IRP Rev L)
(8) SM-104:Evaluate how weightlessness-induced changes in sensorimotor/vestibular function relate to and/or interact with changes in other brain functions (sleep, cognition, attention) (IRP Rev M)
Flight Assignment/Project Notes: NOTE: End date changed to 12/31/2027 per NSSC information (Ed., 1/27/21)

Task Description: This is an international proposal consisting of 2 projects with synergistic aims that will be carried out in a joint effort by Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR: German Aerospace Center)/European Space Agency (ESA) and NASA. It addresses the Human Research Program (HRP) Risk of Adverse Cognitive or Behavioral Conditions and Psychiatric Disorders, Human Research Program's requirement to demonstrate the presence or absence of unacceptable deleterious neurocognitive effects beyond the experience base of six-month expeditions, and to permit extrapolation to early interplanetary expeditions. It also addresses several other critical Human Research Program risks and gaps (e.g., BMed1, BMed2, BMed3, BMed5, CNS-1, SM26). More specifically, we will target NASA's particular interest in studying the 'Cognitive-perceptual-visuospatial brain domain changes due to isolation and confinement' as part of the integrated One-Year Mission Project (i1YMP) on the International Space Station (ISS). The data we propose to collect will - for the first time - reliably demonstrate whether prolonging mission duration to one year will have detrimental effects on general cognitive performance (measured with the Cognition test battery), spatial cognition, structural and functional brain changes in general, and hippocampal plasticity more specifically relative to the shorter 6-month and 2-month missions. Using state-of-the-art neuroimaging techniques (that include functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while performing the Cognition test battery in the scanner)), we will determine the biological basis for any changes in cognitive performance, with a focus on hippocampal plasticity. Similar data already gathered on the ISS and in several short- and long-duration space analog environments will be used to generate a normative data base for long-duration missions. Finally, we will derive dose-response relationships between cognitive-visuospatial brain domain changes and mission duration that will allow predicting vulnerability to adverse cognitive or behavioral impairment and psychiatric disorders on interplanetary expeditions such as a mission to Mars. The two 7-yr projects will deliver a highly unique and comprehensive set of integrated neuroimaging and neurocognitive tools for the evaluation and ultimately prevention of adverse effects on brain structure and function that lead to behavioral effects associated with exploration-type missions.

Research Impact/Earth Benefits: The two 7-yr projects will deliver a highly unique and comprehensive set of integrated neuroimaging and neurocognitive tools for the evaluation and ultimately prevention of adverse effects on brain structure and function that lead to behavioral effects associated with exploration-type missions. As the Cognition test battery was developed for high-performing subject populations, this work will also translate to high performing populations on Earth (e.g., physicians, submariners).

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2022 
Task Progress: The integrated Project A&B magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol was finalized, which is ready for deployment at the Victory Lakes facility of the University of Texas Medical Branch. Video materials for NASA's Research Operations and Integration (ROI) for an integrated informed consent briefing were prepared. We are waiting for the first astronaut to consent. We are ready to set up the scanner at Victory Lakes once we have our first confirmed study participant. The goal is to set up the scanner as close to the first scan as possible as software and hardware changes are always possible and might require setting up the scanner again.

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 12/22/2021) 

Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
 None in FY 2022
Project Title:  Temporal Nature of Cognitive and Visuospatial Brain Domain Changes During Long-Duration Low-Earth Orbit Missions Reduce
Images: icon  Fiscal Year: FY 2021 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP HFBP:Human Factors & Behavioral Performance (IRP Rev H)
Start Date: 06/01/2019  
End Date: 12/31/2027  
Task Last Updated: 03/03/2021 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Basner, Mathias  M.D., Ph.D. / University of Pennsylvania 
Address:  Department of Psychiatry, Division of Sleep and Chronobiology 
423 Service Dr, 1013 Blockley Hall 
Philadelphia , PA 19104-4209 
Email: basner@pennmedicine.upenn.edu 
Phone: 215-573-5866  
Congressional District:
Web:  
Organization Type: UNIVERSITY 
Organization Name: University of Pennsylvania 
Joint Agency:  
Comments:  
Co-Investigator(s)
Affiliation: 
Dinges, David  Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania 
Gunga, Hanns-Christian  M.D. Charite - Universitatsmedizin Berlin, Germany 
Gur, Ruben  Ph.D. The Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania 
Hartley, Tom  Ph.D. University of York, United Kingdom 
Kuehn, Simone  Ph.D. Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Berlin, Germany 
Moore, Tyler  Ph.D. Trustees of Tufts College 
Riecke, Bernhard  Ph.D. Simon Fraser University, Canada 
Roalf, David  Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania 
Roma, Peter  Ph.D. NASA Johnson Space Center 
Schneiderman, Jason  Ph.D. KBR/NASA Johnson Space Center 
Wolbers, Thomas  Ph.D. German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, Germany 
Stahn, Alexander  Ph.D. Charite - Universitatsmedizin Berlin, Germany (University of Pennsylvania) 
Project Information: Grant/Contract No. 80NSSC19K1046 
Responsible Center: NASA JSC 
Grant Monitor: Whitmire, Alexandra  
Center Contact:  
alexandra.m.whitmire@nasa.gov 
Solicitation / Funding Source: 2017-2018 HERO 80JSC017N0001-BPBA Topics in Biological, Physiological, and Behavioral Adaptations to Spaceflight. Appendix C 
Grant/Contract No.: 80NSSC19K1046 
Project Type: FLIGHT 
Flight Program:  
TechPort: No 
No. of Post Docs:
No. of PhD Candidates:
No. of Master's Candidates:
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:
No. of PhD Degrees:
No. of Master's Degrees:
No. of Bachelor's Degrees:
Human Research Program Elements: (1) HFBP:Human Factors & Behavioral Performance (IRP Rev H)
Human Research Program Risks: (1) Bmed:Risk of Adverse Behavioral Conditions and Psychiatric Disorders
(2) Sensorimotor:Risk of Altered Sensorimotor/Vestibular Function Impacting Critical Mission Tasks (Revised as of IRP Rev M)
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) BMed-101:We need to identify, quantify, and validate the key selection factors for astronaut cognitive and behavioral strengths (e.g., resiliency) and operationally-relevant performance threats for increasingly Earth independent, long-duration, autonomous, and/or long-distance exploration missions (IRP Rev L)
(2) BMed-102:Given exposures to spaceflight hazards (space radiation, isolation), how do we identify individual susceptibility, monitor molecular/biomarkers and acceptable thresholds, and validate behavioral health and CNS/neurological/neuropsychological performance measures and domains of relevance to exploration class missions? (IRP Rev L)
(3) BMed-103:What are the validated, efficacious treatments (individual or Team-based) and/or countermeasures to prevent adverse behavioral conditions, CNS/neurological, and/or psychiatric disorders caused by either single and/or integrated exposures to spaceflight hazards during exploration class missions? (IRP Rev L)
(4) BMed-104:Given the potentially negative spaceflight associated CNS changes and behavioral experiences of stressors during long-duration missions (e.g., isolation, confinement, reduced sensory stimulation, altered gravity, space radiation), what are validated modifications to habitat/vehicle to mitigate stressors impacting on CNS / cognition / behavioral health? (IRP Rev L)
(5) BMed-105:Given the potentially negative spaceflight associated CNS/cognitive changes and behavioral experiences of stressors during long-duration missions (e.g., isolation, confinement, reduced sensory stimulation, altered gravity, space radiation), what are validated medical or dietary countermeasures to mitigate stressors impacting on CNS / cognition / behavioral health? (IRP Rev L)
(6) BMed-107:What are the long-term changes and risks to astronaut health post-mission that, when using a continuity of care model, helps retrospectively identify and understand individual susceptibility (e.g., hereditary, dose, thresholds) to mitigate adverse CNS, cognitive, and behavioral health changes resulting from long-duration exploration missions, promoting the behavioral health of current and future crews? (IRP Rev L)
(7) BMed-108:Given each crewmember will experience multiple spaceflight hazards simultaneously, we need to identify and characterize the potential additive, antagonistic, or synergistic impacts of multiple stressors (e.g., space radiation, altered gravity, isolation, altered immune, altered sleep) on crew health and/or CNS/ cognitive functioning to develop threshold limits and validate countermeasures for any identified adverse crew health and/or operationally-relevant performance outcomes (IRP Rev L)
(8) SM-104:Evaluate how weightlessness-induced changes in sensorimotor/vestibular function relate to and/or interact with changes in other brain functions (sleep, cognition, attention) (IRP Rev M)
Flight Assignment/Project Notes: NOTE: End date changed to 12/31/2027 per NSSC information (Ed., 1/27/21)

Task Description: This is an international proposal consisting of 2 projects with synergistic aims that will be carried out in a joint effort by Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR: German Aerospace Center)/European Space Agency (ESA) and NASA. It addresses the Human Research Program (HRP) Risk of Adverse Cognitive or Behavioral Conditions and Psychiatric Disorders, Human Research Program's requirement to demonstrate the presence or absence of unacceptable deleterious neurocognitive effects beyond the experience base of six-month expeditions, and to permit extrapolation to early interplanetary expeditions. It also addresses several other critical Human Research Program risks and gaps (e.g., BMed1, BMed2, BMed3, BMed5, CNS-1, SM26). More specifically, we will target NASA's particular interest in studying the 'Cognitive-perceptual-visuospatial brain domain changes due to isolation and confinement' as part of the integrated One-Year Mission Project (i1YMP) on the International Space Station (ISS). The data we propose to collect will - for the first time - reliably demonstrate whether prolonging mission duration to one year will have detrimental effects on general cognitive performance (measured with the Cognition test battery), spatial cognition, structural and functional brain changes in general, and hippocampal plasticity more specifically relative to the shorter 6-month and 2-month missions. Using state-of-the-art neuroimaging techniques (that include functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while performing the Cognition test battery in the scanner)), we will determine the biological basis for any changes in cognitive performance, with a focus on hippocampal plasticity. Similar data already gathered on the ISS and in several short- and long-duration space analog environments will be used to generate a normative data base for long-duration missions. Finally, we will derive dose-response relationships between cognitive-visuospatial brain domain changes and mission duration that will allow predicting vulnerability to adverse cognitive or behavioral impairment and psychiatric disorders on interplanetary expeditions such as a mission to Mars. The two 7-yr projects will deliver a highly unique and comprehensive set of integrated neuroimaging and neurocognitive tools for the evaluation and ultimately prevention of adverse effects on brain structure and function that lead to behavioral effects associated with exploration-type missions.

Research Impact/Earth Benefits: The two 7-yr projects will deliver a highly unique and comprehensive set of integrated neuroimaging and neurocognitive tools for the evaluation and ultimately prevention of adverse effects on brain structure and function that lead to behavioral effects associated with exploration-type missions. As the Cognition test battery was developed for high-performing subject populations, this work will also translate to high performing populations on Earth (e.g., physicians, submariners).

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2021 
Task Progress: The project exited the definition phase on 12/31/2020. The following definition phase objectives were met: Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval was obtained on December 2, 2019. We established a reliance agreement between the IRB of the University of Pennsylvania and Johnson Space Center (JSC) IRB. Also, we made amendments to the IRB to reflect changes in the study protocol in relation to the integration process coordinated by Research Operations & Integration (ROI) element. We acquired and tested hardware for administering our imaging protocol at the Victory Lakes facility of University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB). We decided to further delay scanner set up as the first Complement of Integrated Protocols for Human Exploration Research (CIPHER) astronaut will not fly before January 2022, and scanner hardware and/or software may change before our first scan. We will make sure that we will set up the scanner close to the pre-flight scan of the first astronaut.

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 12/22/2021) 

Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
Articles in Peer-reviewed Journals Smith MG, Kelley M, Basner M. "A brief history of spaceflight from 1961 to 2020: An analysis of missions and astronaut demographics." Acta Astronaut. 2020 Oct;175:290-9. Epub 2020 Jun 3. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.actaastro.2020.06.004 ; PMID: 32801403; PMCID: PMC7422727 , Oct-2020
Project Title:  Temporal Nature of Cognitive and Visuospatial Brain Domain Changes During Long-Duration Low-Earth Orbit Missions Reduce
Images: icon  Fiscal Year: FY 2020 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP HFBP:Human Factors & Behavioral Performance (IRP Rev H)
Start Date: 06/01/2019  
End Date: 12/31/2027  
Task Last Updated: 03/30/2020 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Basner, Mathias  M.D., Ph.D. / University of Pennsylvania 
Address:  Department of Psychiatry, Division of Sleep and Chronobiology 
423 Service Dr, 1013 Blockley Hall 
Philadelphia , PA 19104-4209 
Email: basner@pennmedicine.upenn.edu 
Phone: 215-573-5866  
Congressional District:
Web:  
Organization Type: UNIVERSITY 
Organization Name: University of Pennsylvania 
Joint Agency:  
Comments:  
Co-Investigator(s)
Affiliation: 
Dinges, David  Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania 
Gunga, Hanns-Christian  M.D. Charite - Universitatsmedizin Berlin, Germany 
Gur, Ruben  Ph.D. The Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania 
Hartley, Tom  Ph.D. University of York, United Kingdom 
Kuehn, Simone  Ph.D. Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Berlin, Germany 
Moore, Tyler  Ph.D. Trustees of Tufts College 
Riecke, Bernhard  Ph.D. Simon Fraser University, Canada 
Roalf, David  Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania 
Roma, Peter  Ph.D. NASA Johnson Space Center 
Schneiderman, Jason  Ph.D. Wyle Laboratories, Inc./NASA Johnson Space Center 
Wolbers, Thomas  Ph.D. German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, Germany 
Stahn, Alexander  Ph.D. Charite - Universitatsmedizin Berlin, Germany (University of Pennsylvania) 
Project Information: Grant/Contract No. 80NSSC19K1046 
Responsible Center: NASA JSC 
Grant Monitor: Williams, Thomas  
Center Contact: 281-483-8773 
thomas.j.will1@nasa.gov 
Solicitation / Funding Source: 2017-2018 HERO 80JSC017N0001-BPBA Topics in Biological, Physiological, and Behavioral Adaptations to Spaceflight. Appendix C 
Grant/Contract No.: 80NSSC19K1046 
Project Type: FLIGHT 
Flight Program:  
TechPort: No 
No. of Post Docs:
No. of PhD Candidates:
No. of Master's Candidates:
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:
No. of PhD Degrees:
No. of Master's Degrees:
No. of Bachelor's Degrees:
Human Research Program Elements: (1) HFBP:Human Factors & Behavioral Performance (IRP Rev H)
Human Research Program Risks: (1) Bmed:Risk of Adverse Behavioral Conditions and Psychiatric Disorders
(2) Sensorimotor:Risk of Altered Sensorimotor/Vestibular Function Impacting Critical Mission Tasks (Revised as of IRP Rev M)
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) BMed-101:We need to identify, quantify, and validate the key selection factors for astronaut cognitive and behavioral strengths (e.g., resiliency) and operationally-relevant performance threats for increasingly Earth independent, long-duration, autonomous, and/or long-distance exploration missions (IRP Rev L)
(2) BMed-102:Given exposures to spaceflight hazards (space radiation, isolation), how do we identify individual susceptibility, monitor molecular/biomarkers and acceptable thresholds, and validate behavioral health and CNS/neurological/neuropsychological performance measures and domains of relevance to exploration class missions? (IRP Rev L)
(3) BMed-103:What are the validated, efficacious treatments (individual or Team-based) and/or countermeasures to prevent adverse behavioral conditions, CNS/neurological, and/or psychiatric disorders caused by either single and/or integrated exposures to spaceflight hazards during exploration class missions? (IRP Rev L)
(4) BMed-104:Given the potentially negative spaceflight associated CNS changes and behavioral experiences of stressors during long-duration missions (e.g., isolation, confinement, reduced sensory stimulation, altered gravity, space radiation), what are validated modifications to habitat/vehicle to mitigate stressors impacting on CNS / cognition / behavioral health? (IRP Rev L)
(5) BMed-105:Given the potentially negative spaceflight associated CNS/cognitive changes and behavioral experiences of stressors during long-duration missions (e.g., isolation, confinement, reduced sensory stimulation, altered gravity, space radiation), what are validated medical or dietary countermeasures to mitigate stressors impacting on CNS / cognition / behavioral health? (IRP Rev L)
(6) BMed-107:What are the long-term changes and risks to astronaut health post-mission that, when using a continuity of care model, helps retrospectively identify and understand individual susceptibility (e.g., hereditary, dose, thresholds) to mitigate adverse CNS, cognitive, and behavioral health changes resulting from long-duration exploration missions, promoting the behavioral health of current and future crews? (IRP Rev L)
(7) BMed-108:Given each crewmember will experience multiple spaceflight hazards simultaneously, we need to identify and characterize the potential additive, antagonistic, or synergistic impacts of multiple stressors (e.g., space radiation, altered gravity, isolation, altered immune, altered sleep) on crew health and/or CNS/ cognitive functioning to develop threshold limits and validate countermeasures for any identified adverse crew health and/or operationally-relevant performance outcomes (IRP Rev L)
(8) SM-104:Evaluate how weightlessness-induced changes in sensorimotor/vestibular function relate to and/or interact with changes in other brain functions (sleep, cognition, attention) (IRP Rev M)
Flight Assignment/Project Notes: NOTE: End date changed to 12/31/2027 per NSSC information (Ed., 1/27/21)

Task Description: This is an international proposal consisting of 2 projects with synergistic aims that will be carried out in a joint effort by Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR: German Aerospace Center)/European Space Agency (ESA) and NASA. It addresses the Human Research Program (HRP) Risk of Adverse Cognitive or Behavioral Conditions and Psychiatric Disorders, Human Research Program's requirement to demonstrate the presence or absence of unacceptable deleterious neurocognitive effects beyond the experience base of six-month expeditions, and to permit extrapolation to early interplanetary expeditions. It also addresses several other critical Human Research Program risks and gaps (e.g., BMed1, BMed2, BMed3, BMed5, CNS-1, SM26). More specifically, we will target NASA's particular interest in studying the 'Cognitive-perceptual-visuospatial brain domain changes due to isolation and confinement' as part of the integrated One-Year Mission Project (i1YMP) on the International Space Station (ISS). The data we propose to collect will - for the first time - reliably demonstrate whether prolonging mission duration to one year will have detrimental effects on general cognitive performance (measured with the Cognition test battery), spatial cognition, structural and functional brain changes in general, and hippocampal plasticity more specifically relative to the shorter 6-month and 2-month missions. Using state-of-the-art neuroimaging techniques (that include functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while performing the Cognition test battery in the scanner), we will determine the biological basis for any changes in cognitive performance, with a focus on hippocampal plasticity. Similar data already gathered on the ISS and in several short- and long-duration space analog environments will be used to generate a normative data base for long-duration missions. Finally, we will derive dose-response relationships between cognitive-visuospatial brain domain changes and mission duration that will allow predicting vulnerability to adverse cognitive or behavioral impairment and psychiatric disorders on interplanetary expeditions such as a mission to Mars. The two 7-yr projects will deliver a highly unique and comprehensive set of integrated neuroimaging and neurocognitive tools for the evaluation and ultimately prevention of adverse effects on brain structure and function that lead to behavioral effects associated with exploration-type missions.

Research Impact/Earth Benefits: The two 7-yr projects will deliver a highly unique and comprehensive set of integrated neuroimaging and neurocognitive tools for the evaluation and ultimately prevention of adverse effects on brain structure and function that lead to behavioral effects associated with exploration-type missions. As the Cognition test battery was developed for high-performing subject populations, this work will also translate to high performing populations on Earth (e.g., physicians, submariners).

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2020 
Task Progress: The project is currently in its definition phase. The following definition phase objectives were met: Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval was obtained on December 2, 2019. We worked diligently with Research Operations and Integration (ROI) and the other integrated One-Year Mission Project (i1YMP) investigators to integrate our project. We acquired hardware for administering our imaging protocol at the Victory Lakes facility of University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB). With approval of the element, we postponed setting up our protocol in the scanner as the facility plans software and hardware updates in the near future. Dr. Basner attended all virtual meetings and an investigator meeting at Johnson Space Center (JSC) at the end of January 2020.

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 12/22/2021) 

Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
 None in FY 2020
Project Title:  Temporal Nature of Cognitive and Visuospatial Brain Domain Changes During Long-Duration Low-Earth Orbit Missions Reduce
Images: icon  Fiscal Year: FY 2019 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP HFBP:Human Factors & Behavioral Performance (IRP Rev H)
Start Date: 06/01/2019  
End Date: 05/31/2026  
Task Last Updated: 07/12/2019 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Basner, Mathias  M.D., Ph.D. / University of Pennsylvania 
Address:  Department of Psychiatry, Division of Sleep and Chronobiology 
423 Service Dr, 1013 Blockley Hall 
Philadelphia , PA 19104-4209 
Email: basner@pennmedicine.upenn.edu 
Phone: 215-573-5866  
Congressional District:
Web:  
Organization Type: UNIVERSITY 
Organization Name: University of Pennsylvania 
Joint Agency:  
Comments:  
Co-Investigator(s)
Affiliation: 
Dinges, David  Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania 
Gunga, Hanns-Christian  M.D. Charite - Universitatsmedizin Berlin, Germany 
Gur, Ruben  Ph.D. The Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania 
Hartley, Tom  Ph.D. University of York, United Kingdom 
Kuehn, Simone  Ph.D. Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Berlin, Germany 
Moore, Tyler  Ph.D. Trustees of Tufts College 
Riecke, Bernhard  Ph.D. Simon Fraser University, Canada 
Roalf, David  Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania 
Roma, Peter  Ph.D. NASA Johnson Space Center 
Schneiderman, Jason  Ph.D. Wyle Laboratories, Inc./NASA Johnson Space Center 
Wolbers, Thomas  Ph.D. German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, Germany 
Stahn, Alexander  Ph.D. Charite - Universitatsmedizin Berlin, Germany (University of Pennsylvania) 
Project Information: Grant/Contract No. 80NSSC19K1046 
Responsible Center: NASA JSC 
Grant Monitor: Williams, Thomas  
Center Contact: 281-483-8773 
thomas.j.will1@nasa.gov 
Solicitation / Funding Source: 2017-2018 HERO 80JSC017N0001-BPBA Topics in Biological, Physiological, and Behavioral Adaptations to Spaceflight. Appendix C 
Grant/Contract No.: 80NSSC19K1046 
Project Type: FLIGHT 
Flight Program:  
TechPort: No 
No. of Post Docs:  
No. of PhD Candidates:  
No. of Master's Candidates:  
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:  
No. of PhD Degrees:  
No. of Master's Degrees:  
No. of Bachelor's Degrees:  
Human Research Program Elements: (1) HFBP:Human Factors & Behavioral Performance (IRP Rev H)
Human Research Program Risks: (1) Bmed:Risk of Adverse Behavioral Conditions and Psychiatric Disorders
(2) Sensorimotor:Risk of Altered Sensorimotor/Vestibular Function Impacting Critical Mission Tasks (Revised as of IRP Rev M)
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) BMed-101:We need to identify, quantify, and validate the key selection factors for astronaut cognitive and behavioral strengths (e.g., resiliency) and operationally-relevant performance threats for increasingly Earth independent, long-duration, autonomous, and/or long-distance exploration missions (IRP Rev L)
(2) BMed-102:Given exposures to spaceflight hazards (space radiation, isolation), how do we identify individual susceptibility, monitor molecular/biomarkers and acceptable thresholds, and validate behavioral health and CNS/neurological/neuropsychological performance measures and domains of relevance to exploration class missions? (IRP Rev L)
(3) BMed-103:What are the validated, efficacious treatments (individual or Team-based) and/or countermeasures to prevent adverse behavioral conditions, CNS/neurological, and/or psychiatric disorders caused by either single and/or integrated exposures to spaceflight hazards during exploration class missions? (IRP Rev L)
(4) BMed-104:Given the potentially negative spaceflight associated CNS changes and behavioral experiences of stressors during long-duration missions (e.g., isolation, confinement, reduced sensory stimulation, altered gravity, space radiation), what are validated modifications to habitat/vehicle to mitigate stressors impacting on CNS / cognition / behavioral health? (IRP Rev L)
(5) BMed-105:Given the potentially negative spaceflight associated CNS/cognitive changes and behavioral experiences of stressors during long-duration missions (e.g., isolation, confinement, reduced sensory stimulation, altered gravity, space radiation), what are validated medical or dietary countermeasures to mitigate stressors impacting on CNS / cognition / behavioral health? (IRP Rev L)
(6) BMed-107:What are the long-term changes and risks to astronaut health post-mission that, when using a continuity of care model, helps retrospectively identify and understand individual susceptibility (e.g., hereditary, dose, thresholds) to mitigate adverse CNS, cognitive, and behavioral health changes resulting from long-duration exploration missions, promoting the behavioral health of current and future crews? (IRP Rev L)
(7) BMed-108:Given each crewmember will experience multiple spaceflight hazards simultaneously, we need to identify and characterize the potential additive, antagonistic, or synergistic impacts of multiple stressors (e.g., space radiation, altered gravity, isolation, altered immune, altered sleep) on crew health and/or CNS/ cognitive functioning to develop threshold limits and validate countermeasures for any identified adverse crew health and/or operationally-relevant performance outcomes (IRP Rev L)
(8) SM-104:Evaluate how weightlessness-induced changes in sensorimotor/vestibular function relate to and/or interact with changes in other brain functions (sleep, cognition, attention) (IRP Rev M)
Task Description: This is an international proposal consisting of 2 projects with synergistic aims that will be carried out in a joint effort by Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR: German Aerospace Center)/European Space Agency (ESA) and NASA. It addresses the HRP Risk of Adverse Cognitive or Behavioral Conditions and Psychiatric Disorders, Human Research Program's requirement to demonstrate the presence or absence of unacceptable deleterious neurocognitive effects beyond the experience base of six-month expeditions, and to permit extrapolation to early interplanetary expeditions. It also addresses several other critical Human Research Program risks and gaps (e.g., BMed1, BMed2, BMed3, BMed5, CNS-1, SM26). More specifically, we will target NASA's particular interest in studying the 'Cognitive-perceptual-visuospatial brain domain changes due to isolation and confinement' as part of the integrated One-Year Mission Project (i1YMP) on the International Space Station (ISS). The data we propose to collect will - for the first time - reliably demonstrate whether prolonging mission duration to one year will have detrimental effects on general cognitive performance (measured with the Cognition test battery), spatial cognition, structural and functional brain changes in general, and hippocampal plasticity more specifically relative to the shorter 6-month and 2-month missions. Using state-of-the-art neuroimaging techniques (that include functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while performing the Cognition test battery in the scanner), we will determine the biological basis for any changes in cognitive performance, with a focus on hippocampal plasticity. Similar data already gathered on the ISS and in several short- and long-duration space analog environments will be used to generate a normative data base for long-duration missions. Finally, we will derive dose-response relationships between cognitive-visuospatial brain domain changes and mission duration that will allow predicting vulnerability to adverse cognitive or behavioral impairment and psychiatric disorders on interplanetary expeditions such as a mission to Mars. The two 7-yr projects will deliver a highly unique and comprehensive set of integrated neuroimaging and neurocognitive tools for the evaluation and ultimately prevention of adverse effects on brain structure and function that lead to behavioral effects associated with exploration-type missions.

Research Impact/Earth Benefits:

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2019 
Task Progress: New project for FY2019.

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 12/22/2021) 

Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
 None in FY 2019