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Project Title:  Characterization of Jugular Venous Blood Flow during Acute Fluid Shifts Reduce
Images: icon  Fiscal Year: FY 2021 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Start Date: 08/01/2020  
End Date: 11/01/2022  
Task Last Updated: 06/02/2021 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Marshall-Goebel, Karina  Ph.D. / KBR/NASA Johnson Space Center 
Address:  Mail Code SK111 
2101 NASA Parkway 
Houston , TX 77058 
Email: Karina.j.marshallgoebel@nasa.gov  
Phone: 281-792-9996  
Congressional District: 36 
Web:  
Organization Type: NASA CENTER 
Organization Name: KBR/NASA Johnson Space Center 
Joint Agency:  
Comments: New affiliation as of fall 2018: KBR/NASA Johnson Space Center, Cardiovascular and Vision Laboratory, Houston; previously at Massachusetts General Hospital 
Co-Investigator(s)
Affiliation: 
Greenwald, Scott  Ph.D. KBR/NASA Johnson Space Center 
Laurie, Steven  Ph.D. KBR/NASA Johnson Space Center 
Lee, Stuart  Ph.D. KBR/NASA Johnson Space Center 
Macias, Brandon  Ph.D. NASA Johnson Space Center 
Martin, David  M.S. KBR/NASA Johnson Space Center 
Young, Millennia  Ph.D. NASA Johnson Space Center 
Lytle, Jaon  Ph.D. KBR/NASA Johnson Space Center 
Jasien, Jessica  Ph.D. KBR/NASA Johnson Space Center 
Pardon, Laura  O.D., Ph.D. KBR/NASA Johnson Space Center 
Key Personnel Changes / Previous PI: June 2021 report: Millennia Young, Jason Lytle, Jessica Jasien, and Laura Pardon were added as co-investigators to this project; Nathaniel Mercaldo and Linda Loerch are no longer working on the project.
Project Information: Grant/Contract No. Internal Project 
Responsible Center: NASA JSC 
Grant Monitor: Stenger, Michael  
Center Contact: 281-483-1311 
michael.b.stenger@nasa.gov 
Solicitation / Funding Source: 2019 HERO 80JSC019N0001-FLAGSHIP & OMNIBUS: Human Research Program Crew Health. Appendix A&B 
Grant/Contract No.: Internal Project 
Project Type: GROUND 
Flight Program:  
TechPort: No 
No. of Post Docs:  
No. of PhD Candidates:  
No. of Master's Candidates:  
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:  
No. of PhD Degrees:  
No. of Master's Degrees:  
No. of Bachelor's Degrees:  
Human Research Program Elements: (1) HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Human Research Program Risks: (1) Cardiovascular:Risk of Cardiovascular Adaptations Contributing to Adverse Mission Performance and Health Outcomes (IRP Rev M)
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) CVD-101:To determine whether long-duration weightlessness induces cardiovascular structural and functional changes and/or oxidative stress & damage (OSaD)/inflammation, that can contribute to development of disease (IRP Rev L)
Flight Assignment/Project Notes: NOTE: End date changed to 11/1/2022 per C. Ribeiro/HHC/JSC (Ed., 5/18/21)

Task Description: Cerebral venous congestion leading to decreased cerebral venous outflow is hypothesized to contribute to the development of the spaceflight associated neuro-ocular syndrome (SANS) in astronauts. Recently, our team discovered that chronic exposure to weightlessness can result in stagnant or retrograde blood flow in the internal jugular vein (IJV) during long-duration missions onboard the International Space Station (ISS). While venous stasis was observed in the Fluid Shifts study after 50 days of spaceflight, it is unknown if this is an immediate effect of weightlessness. Characterizing the temporal profile of the headward fluid shift that occurs secondary to weightlessness is crucial as IJV blood flow stasis could be a significant risk for civilian commercial spaceflight, lunar missions, and exploration class missions in addition to ISS missions. Thus, we will utilize 2D and Doppler ultrasonography to investigate cerebral venous drainage pathways during acute weightlessness via parabolic flight to determine the temporal profile of cerebral venous congestion.

Research Impact/Earth Benefits:

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2021 
Task Progress: This study has been assigned to the 162nd Novespace parabolic flight campaign, scheduled to occur in October, 2021. In this reporting period, we were assigned to a Novespace technical point of contact and we prepared and coordinated our parabolic flight study in association with the European Space Agency (ESA) and Novespace. We completed the experimental safety data package – a comprehensive document required by Novespace that describes the experiment, its implementation and protocol, and safety practices. The team also developed data collection procedures, designed the layout of the experiment in the plane (i.e., positions of subjects relative to the sonographers and equipment) and trained multiple operators on the use of the hardware and data collection protocol. We designed the rack units and equipment mounting brackets per Novespace’s strict design criteria for parabolic flight. Finally, we conducted multiple simulations to prepare the team for the flights.

We have received approval from the NASA Institutional Review Board and have submitted all documents to Novespace for the French Ethical Committee approval (Comité de Protection des Personnes).

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 07/08/2021) 

Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
Abstracts for Journals and Proceedings Marshall-Goebel K, Pardon L, Greenwald S, Laurie S, Lee SMC, Martin D, Mercaldo N, Macias B. "Characterization of Jugular Venous Blood Flow during Acute Fluid Shifts." Virtual poster presentation. 2021 NASA Human Research Program Investigators’ Workshop, Virtual, February 1-4, 2021.

Abstracts. 2021 NASA Human Research Program Investigators’ Workshop, Virtual, February 1-4, 2021. , Feb-2021

Project Title:  Characterization of Jugular Venous Blood Flow during Acute Fluid Shifts Reduce
Images: icon  Fiscal Year: FY 2020 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Start Date: 08/01/2020  
End Date: 11/01/2022  
Task Last Updated: 12/05/2020 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Marshall-Goebel, Karina  Ph.D. / KBR/NASA Johnson Space Center 
Address:  Mail Code SK111 
2101 NASA Parkway 
Houston , TX 77058 
Email: Karina.j.marshallgoebel@nasa.gov  
Phone: 281-792-9996  
Congressional District: 36 
Web:  
Organization Type: NASA CENTER 
Organization Name: KBR/NASA Johnson Space Center 
Joint Agency:  
Comments: New affiliation as of fall 2018: KBR/NASA Johnson Space Center, Cardiovascular and Vision Laboratory, Houston; previously at Massachusetts General Hospital 
Co-Investigator(s)
Affiliation: 
Greenwald, Scott  Ph.D. KBR/NASA Johnson Space Center 
Laurie, Steven  Ph.D. KBR/NASA Johnson Space Center 
Lee, Stuart  Ph.D. KBR/NASA Johnson Space Center 
Macias, Brandon  Ph.D. NASA Johnson Space Center 
Martin, David  M.S. KBR/NASA Johnson Space Center 
Mercaldo, Nathaniel  Ph.D. KBR/NASA Johnson Space Center 
Loerch, Linda  M.S. NASA Johnson Space Center 
Project Information: Grant/Contract No. Internal Project 
Responsible Center: NASA JSC 
Grant Monitor: Norsk, Peter  
Center Contact:  
Peter.norsk@nasa.gov 
Solicitation / Funding Source: 2019 HERO 80JSC019N0001-FLAGSHIP & OMNIBUS: Human Research Program Crew Health. Appendix A&B 
Grant/Contract No.: Internal Project 
Project Type: GROUND 
Flight Program:  
TechPort: No 
No. of Post Docs:  
No. of PhD Candidates:  
No. of Master's Candidates:  
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:  
No. of PhD Degrees:  
No. of Master's Degrees:  
No. of Bachelor's Degrees:  
Human Research Program Elements: (1) HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Human Research Program Risks: (1) Cardiovascular:Risk of Cardiovascular Adaptations Contributing to Adverse Mission Performance and Health Outcomes (IRP Rev M)
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) CVD-101:To determine whether long-duration weightlessness induces cardiovascular structural and functional changes and/or oxidative stress & damage (OSaD)/inflammation, that can contribute to development of disease (IRP Rev L)
Flight Assignment/Project Notes: NOTE: End date changed to 11/1/2022 per C. Ribeiro/HHC/JSC (Ed., 5/18/21)

Task Description: Cerebral venous congestion leading to decreased cerebral venous outflow is hypothesized to contribute to the development of the spaceflight associated neuro-ocular syndrome (SANS) in astronauts. Recently, our team discovered that chronic exposure to weightlessness can result in stagnant or retrograde blood flow in the internal jugular vein (IJV) during long-duration missions onboard the International Space Station. While venous stasis was observed in the Fluid Shifts study after 50 days of spaceflight, it is unknown if this is an immediate effect of weightlessness. Characterizing the temporal profile of the headward fluid shift that occurs secondary to weightlessness is crucial as IJV blood flow stasis could be a significant risk for civilian commercial spaceflight, lunar missions, and exploration class missions in addition to International Space Station missions. Thus, we will utilize 2D and Doppler ultrasonography to investigate cerebral venous drainage pathways during acute weightlessness via parabolic flight to determine the temporal profile of cerebral venous congestion.

Research Impact/Earth Benefits:

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2020 
Task Progress: New project for FY2020.

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 07/08/2021) 

Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
 None in FY 2020