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Project Title:  Distribution of Body Fluids during Long Duration Space Flight and Subsequent Effects on Intraocular Pressure and Vision Disturbance (PI: Stenger) Reduce
Images: icon  Fiscal Year: FY 2021 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Start Date: 10/01/2012  
End Date: 10/01/2020  
Task Last Updated: 07/22/2020 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Stenger, Michael  Ph.D. / NASA Johnson Space Center 
Address:  SK3/Biomedical Research and Environmental Sciences Division 
 
Houston , TX 77058 
Email: michael.b.stenger@nasa.gov 
Phone: 281-483-1311  
Congressional District: 22 
Web:  
Organization Type: NASA CENTER 
Organization Name: NASA Johnson Space Center 
Joint Agency:  
Comments: NOTE Aug 2018: Previously with KBRwyle at Johnson Space Center  
Co-Investigator(s)
Affiliation: 
Johnston, Smith  M.D. NASA Johnson Space Center 
Lee, Stuart  Ph.D. KBR/NASA Johnson Space Center 
Martin, David  M.S. KBR/NASA Johnson Space Center 
Ploutz-Snyder, Robert  Ph.D. Universities Space Research Association, Columbia 
Smith, Scott  Ph.D. NASA Johnson Space Center 
Soller, Babs  Ph.D. Reflectance Medical Inc. 
Laurie, Steven  Ph.D. KBR/NASA Johnson Space Center 
Marshall-Goebel, Karina  Ph.D. KBR/NASA Johnson Space Center 
Ribeiro, Laura Christine  J.D., M.S. KBR/NASA Johnson Space Center 
Project Information: Grant/Contract No. Internal Project 
Responsible Center: NASA JSC 
Grant Monitor: Stenger, Michael  
Center Contact: 281-483-1311 
michael.b.stenger@nasa.gov 
Solicitation / Funding Source: 2011 Crew Health NNJ11ZSA002NA 
Grant/Contract No.: Internal Project 
Project Type: FLIGHT 
Flight Program: ISS 
TechPort: No 
No. of Post Docs:
No. of PhD Candidates:
No. of Master's Candidates:
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:
No. of PhD Degrees:
No. of Master's Degrees:
No. of Bachelor's Degrees:
Human Research Program Elements: (1) HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Human Research Program Risks: (1) CVD:Risk of Spaceflight Induced Cardiovascular Disease (IRP Rev L)
(2) SANS:Risk of Spaceflight Associated Neuro-ocular Syndrome (IRP Rev I)
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) CVD-101:To determine whether long-duration weightlessness induces cardiovascular structural and functional changes and/or oxidative stress & damage (OSaD)/inflammation, that can contribute to development of disease (IRP Rev L)
(2) SANS-101:Determine the relationship between fluid shifts (intravascular, interstitial, CSF) and ocular manifestations in astronauts during spaceflight (IRP Rev M)
Flight Assignment/Project Notes: ISS

NOTE: End date changed to 10/1/2020 as Dr. Steven Laurie took over the project in August 2020 (Ed., 7/15/21)

NOTE: End date changed to 3/31/2022 per C. Ribeiro/HHC/HRP JSC (Ed., 5/6/21)

NOTE: End date changed to 1/29/2021 per J. McFather/HRP JSC (Ed., 10/15/18)

NOTE: End date is 9/30/2018 per PI (Ed., 7/8/15)

NOTE: Risk/Gap changes per IRP Rev E (Ed., 3/24/14)

Task Description: The central objective of the proposed work is to characterize the magnitude of the headward fluid shift during long duration space flight and to measure the subsequent compartmentalization of this fluid. The second objective is to correlate in-flight alterations of eye structure, ocular vascular parameters, and vision with headward fluid shifts, vascular dimensions, and flow patterns. Finally, the third objective is to determine systemic and ocular factors of individual susceptibility to the development of these inflight alterations.

In order to determine the effect of space flight on the headward fluid shift and subsequent redistribution across fluid compartments, biochemical, ultrasound, and other non-invasive cardiovascular measures will be performed before launch, during flight, and after landing. Total body water, extracellular, and intracellular fluid volume will be determined by biochemical dilution techniques. Ultrasound will be used to assess upper vs. lower body interstitial fluid and vascular flow and structure changes, ocular dimensions and optic nerve sheath diameter, and jugular venous pressure. Near infrared spectroscopy will be used to measure lower vs. upper body local tissue hydration, and total peripheral resistance will be calculated from noninvasively acquired blood pressure and cardiac output.

It is currently unclear why only some astronauts experience vision disturbances with space flight. It is hypothesized that astronauts respond differently to the fluid shift inflight and that this impacts changes in ocular structure and function changes. The goal of this study is to test this hypothesis. In doing so, this proposal directly addresses the Integrated Research Plan Gap Cardiovascular (CV)7: How are fluids redistributed in-flight? and Gap Vision Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP)1: What is the etiology of visual acuity and ocular structural and function changes seen in-flight and post-flight? The research proposed here will determine the effect of long duration space flight on fluid shifts and subsequent redistribution across fluid compartments and attempt to discern the contribution of these adaptations to changes in ocular structure and function.

NOTE: This study was merged with investigations from Dr. Alan Hargens (Fluid distribution before, during and after prolonged space flight) and Dr. Scott Dulchavsky (Microgravity associated compartmental equilibration) resulting in a comprehensive study titled “Fluid Shifts Before, During and After Prolonged Space Flight and Their Association with Intracranial Pressure and Visual Impairment” (short title: Fluid Shifts).

NOTE: Continued by "Distribution of Body Fluids during Long Duration Space Flight and Subsequent Effects on Intraocular Pressure and Vision Disturbance (PI: Laurie)" due to Dr. Stenger's move to Element Scientist for Human Health & Countermeasures element.

Research Impact/Earth Benefits: An early hypothesis considered elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) as a cause for space flight associated neuro-ocular syndrome. Because of this, novel noninvasive ICP techniques, included tympanic membrane displacement and otoacoustic emissions are being investigated to determine ICP changes associated with space flight. Knowledge gained from this study may inform medical professionals treating and studying patients suffering from idiopathic intracranial hypertension, a debilitating condition with some characteristics in common with that experienced by astronauts.

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2021 
Task Progress: Within this reporting period we completed 10 inflight and 7 post-flight tests. To date, all pre/in/post-flight data collection has been completed on 12 subjects for this experiment. The final subject will require 1 more post-flight session, which will mark the completion of data collection for this study. This is expected to be completed by November of 2020.

Data collected as a part of this project were included in two presentations at the Human Research Program Investigators' Workshop in Galveston, TX, invited oral presentations at the Humans in Space Annual Meeting in Dubai, United Arab Emirates; University of Oregon Department of Human Physiology Seminar Series, Eugene, OR; Loma Linda University Integrated Biomedical Science Seminar, Loma Linda, CA; the Blind Veterans Association Annual Conference, Zoom Virtual Meeting; and the Rice University Keck Seminar, Zoom Virtual Meeting. In addition, a crew report was completed to highlight individual results from that crewmembers participation in this study.

Partial results from this investigation were made available as part of 2 publications in the journals JAMA Ophthalmology and JAMA Network. Results published in JAMA Network revealed the first time a venous thrombosis was identified in a crewmember during space flight. This resulted in a number of news requests and media coverage.

NOTE: Continued by "Distribution of Body Fluids during Long Duration Space Flight and Subsequent Effects on Intraocular Pressure and Vision Disturbance (PI: Laurie)" due to Dr. Stenger's move to Element Scientist for Human Health & Countermeasures element. See that project for subsequent reporting.

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 08/30/2021) 

Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
Articles in Peer-reviewed Journals Laurie SS, Lee SMC, Macias BR, Patel N, Stern C, Young M, Stenger MB. "Optic disc edema and choroidal engorgement in astronauts during spaceflight and individuals exposed to bed rest. " JAMA Ophthalmol. 2019 Dec 26;138(2):165-72. https://doi.org/10.1001/jamaophthalmol.2019.5261 ; PMID: 31876939; PMCID: PMC6990717 , Dec-2019
Articles in Peer-reviewed Journals Marshall-Goebel K, Laurie SS, Alferova IV, Arbeille P, Auñón-Chancellor SM, Ebert DJ, Lee SMC, Macias BR, Martin DS, Pattarini JM, Ploutz-Snyder R, Ribeiro LC, Tarver WJ, Dulchavsky SA, Hargens AR, Stenger MB. "Assessment of jugular venous blood flow stasis and thrombosis during spaceflight." JAMA Netw Open. 2019 Nov 1;2(11):e1915011. https://doi.org/10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2019.15011 ; PMID: 31722025; PMCID: PMC6902784 , Nov-2019
Articles in Peer-reviewed Journals Stenger MB, Laurie SS, Sadda SR, Sadun AA, Macias BR, Huang AS. "Focus on the optic nerve head in spaceflight-associated neuro-ocular syndrome." Ophthalmology. 2019 Dec;126(12):1604-6. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ophtha.2019.09.009 ; PMID: 31759496 , Dec-2019
Articles in Peer-reviewed Journals Greenwald SH, Macias BR, Lee SMC, Marshall-Goebel K, Ebert DJ, Liu JHK, Ploutz-Snyder RJ, Alferova IV, Dulchavsky SA, Hargens AR, Stenger MB, Laurie SS. "Intraocular pressure and choroidal thickness respond differently to lower body negative pressure during spaceflight." J Appl Physiol (1985). 2021 Aug 1;131(2):613-20. https://doi.org/10.1152/japplphysiol.01040.2020 ; PMID: 34166098 , Aug-2021
Articles in Peer-reviewed Journals Arbeille P, Zuj KA, Macias BR, Ebert DJ, Laurie SS, Sargsyan AE, Martin DS, Lee SMC, Dulchavsky SA, Stenger MB, Hargens AR. "Lower body negative pressure reduces jugular and portal vein volumes, and counteracts the cerebral vein velocity elevation during long-duration spaceflight." J Appl Physiol (1985). 2021 Jul 29. Online ahead of print. https://doi.org/10.1152/japplphysiol.00231.2021 ; PMID: 34323592 , Jul-2021
Articles in Peer-reviewed Journals Macias BR, Ferguson CR, Patel N, Gibson C, Samuels BC, Laurie SS, Lee SMC, Ploutz-Snyder R, Kramer L, Mader TH, Brunstetter T, Alferova IV, Hargens AR, Ebert DJ, Dulchavsky SA, Stenger MB. "Changes in the optic nerve head and choroid over 1 year of spaceflight." JAMA Ophthalmol. 2021 Jun;139(6):663-7. https://doi.org/10.1001/jamaophthalmol.2021.0931 ; PMID: 33914020; PMCID: PMC8085766 , Jun-2021
Project Title:  Distribution of Body Fluids during Long Duration Space Flight and Subsequent Effects on Intraocular Pressure and Vision Disturbance (PI: Stenger) Reduce
Images: icon  Fiscal Year: FY 2020 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Start Date: 10/01/2012  
End Date: 10/01/2020  
Task Last Updated: 07/17/2019 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Stenger, Michael  Ph.D. / NASA Johnson Space Center 
Address:  SK3/Biomedical Research and Environmental Sciences Division 
 
Houston , TX 77058 
Email: michael.b.stenger@nasa.gov 
Phone: 281-483-1311  
Congressional District: 22 
Web:  
Organization Type: NASA CENTER 
Organization Name: NASA Johnson Space Center 
Joint Agency:  
Comments: NOTE Aug 2018: Previously with KBRwyle at Johnson Space Center  
Co-Investigator(s)
Affiliation: 
Johnston, Smith  M.D. NASA Johnson Space Center 
Lee, Stuart  Ph.D. Wyle Laboratories, Inc. 
Martin, David  M.S. Wyle Laboratories, Inc. 
Ploutz-Snyder, Robert  Ph.D. Universities Space Research Association, Columbia 
Smith, Scott  Ph.D. NASA Johnson Space Center 
Soller, Babs  Ph.D. Reflectance Medical Inc. 
Laurie, Steven  Ph.D. Wyle Laboratories, Inc. 
Marshall-Goebel, Karina  Ph.D. KBRwyle/NASA Johnson Space Center 
Ribeiro, Laura Christine KBRwyle/NASA Johnson Space Center 
Project Information: Grant/Contract No. Internal Project 
Responsible Center: NASA JSC 
Grant Monitor: Norsk, Peter  
Center Contact:  
Peter.norsk@nasa.gov 
Solicitation / Funding Source: 2011 Crew Health NNJ11ZSA002NA 
Grant/Contract No.: Internal Project 
Project Type: FLIGHT 
Flight Program: ISS 
TechPort: No 
No. of Post Docs:
No. of PhD Candidates:
No. of Master's Candidates:
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:
No. of PhD Degrees:
No. of Master's Degrees:
No. of Bachelor's Degrees:
Human Research Program Elements: (1) HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Human Research Program Risks: (1) CVD:Risk of Spaceflight Induced Cardiovascular Disease (IRP Rev L)
(2) SANS:Risk of Spaceflight Associated Neuro-ocular Syndrome (IRP Rev I)
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) CVD-101:To determine whether long-duration weightlessness induces cardiovascular structural and functional changes and/or oxidative stress & damage (OSaD)/inflammation, that can contribute to development of disease (IRP Rev L)
(2) SANS-101:Determine the relationship between fluid shifts (intravascular, interstitial, CSF) and ocular manifestations in astronauts during spaceflight (IRP Rev M)
Flight Assignment/Project Notes: ISS

NOTE: End date changed to 10/1/2020 as Dr. Steven Laurie took over the project in August 2020 (Ed., 7/15/21)

NOTE: End date changed to 1/29/2021 per J. McFather/HRP JSC (Ed., 10/15/18)

NOTE: End date is 9/30/2018 per PI (Ed., 7/8/15)

NOTE: Risk/Gap changes per IRP Rev E (Ed., 3/24/14)

Task Description: The central objective of the proposed work is to characterize the magnitude of the headward fluid shift during long duration space flight and to measure the subsequent compartmentalization of this fluid. The second objective is to correlate in-flight alterations of eye structure, ocular vascular parameters, and vision with headward fluid shifts, vascular dimensions, and flow patterns. Finally, the third objective is to determine systemic and ocular factors of individual susceptibility to the development of these inflight alterations.

In order to determine the effect of space flight on the headward fluid shift and subsequent redistribution across fluid compartments, biochemical, ultrasound, and other non-invasive cardiovascular measures will be performed before launch, during flight, and after landing. Total body water, extracellular, and intracellular fluid volume will be determined by biochemical dilution techniques. Ultrasound will be used to assess upper vs. lower body interstitial fluid and vascular flow and structure changes, ocular dimensions and optic nerve sheath diameter, and jugular venous pressure. Near infrared spectroscopy will be used to measure lower vs. upper body local tissue hydration, and total peripheral resistance will be calculated from noninvasively acquired blood pressure and cardiac output.

It is currently unclear why only some astronauts experience vision disturbances with space flight. It is hypothesized that astronauts respond differently to the fluid shift inflight and that this impacts changes in ocular structure and function changes. The goal of this study is to test this hypothesis. In doing so, this proposal directly addresses the Integrated Research Plan Gap Cardiovascular (CV)7: How are fluids redistributed in-flight? and Gap Vision Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP)1: What is the etiology of visual acuity and ocular structural and function changes seen in-flight and post-flight? The research proposed here will determine the effect of long duration space flight on fluid shifts and subsequent redistribution across fluid compartments and attempt to discern the contribution of these adaptations to changes in ocular structure and function.

NOTE: This study was merged with investigations from Dr. Alan Hargens (Fluid distribution before, during and after prolonged space flight) and Dr. Scott Dulchavsky (Microgravity associated compartmental equilibration) resulting in a comprehensive study titled “Fluid Shifts Before, During and After Prolonged Space Flight and Their Association with Intracranial Pressure and Visual Impairment” (short title: Fluid Shifts).

Research Impact/Earth Benefits: An early hypothesis considered elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) as a cause for space flight associated neuro-ocular syndrome. Because of this, novel noninvasive ICP techniques, included tympanic membrane displacement and otoacoustic emissions are being investigated to determine ICP changes associated with space flight. Knowledge gained from this study may inform medical professionals treating and studying patients suffering from idiopathic intracranial hypertension, a debilitating condition with some characteristics in common with that experienced by astronauts.

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2020 
Task Progress: Within this reporting period, 1 subject withdrew for reasons not related to the study. As a result an additional subject enrolled in the study.

Within this reporting period 2 preflight, 4 inflight, and 2 post-flight tests were completed. To date, all pre/in/post-flight data collection has been completed on the first 10 subjects for this experiment. The final 3 subjects will require a total of 4 more inflight sessions and 7 more post-flight sessions. This is expected to be completed by September of 2020.

Data collected as a part of this project were included in two presentations and 3 posters at the Human Research Program Investigators' Workshop in Galveston, TX, an oral presentation at the International Society for Gravitational Physiology conference in Nagoya, Japan, a poster at the American Society for Gravitational and Space Research conference in Washington, D.C., and as two oral presentations and a poster at the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology annual conference in Vancouver, Canada.

Preliminary results from this investigation have been shared with the Human Health and Countermeasures Element, which have informed the Risk status and guided other grant solicitations.

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 08/30/2021) 

Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
Articles in Peer-reviewed Journals Huang AS, Stenger MB, Macias BR. "Gravitational influence on intraocular pressure: Implications for spaceflight and disease." J Glaucoma. 2019 Aug;28(8):756-64. Epub 2019 May 31. https://doi.org/10.1097/IJG.0000000000001293 ; PubMed PMID: 31162175; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC6786882 , Aug-2019
Project Title:  Distribution of Body Fluids during Long Duration Space Flight and Subsequent Effects on Intraocular Pressure and Vision Disturbance (PI: Stenger) Reduce
Images: icon  Fiscal Year: FY 2019 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Start Date: 10/01/2012  
End Date: 01/29/2021  
Task Last Updated: 10/16/2018 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Stenger, Michael  Ph.D. / NASA Johnson Space Center 
Address:  SK3/Biomedical Research and Environmental Sciences Division 
 
Houston , TX 77058 
Email: michael.b.stenger@nasa.gov 
Phone: 281-483-1311  
Congressional District: 22 
Web:  
Organization Type: NASA CENTER 
Organization Name: NASA Johnson Space Center 
Joint Agency:  
Comments: NOTE Aug 2018: Previously with KBRwyle at Johnson Space Center  
Co-Investigator(s)
Affiliation: 
Johnston, Smith  M.D. NASA Johnson Space Center 
Lee, Stuart  Ph.D. Wyle Laboratories, Inc. 
Martin, David  M.S. Wyle Laboratories, Inc. 
Ploutz-Snyder, Robert  Ph.D. Universities Space Research Association, Columbia 
Smith, Scott  Ph.D. NASA Johnson Space Center 
Soller, Babs  Ph.D. Reflectance Medical Inc. 
Laurie, Steven  Ph.D. Wyle Laboratories, Inc. 
Marshall-Goebel, Karina  Ph.D. KBRwyle/NASA Johnson Space Center 
Key Personnel Changes / Previous PI: FY2019 report: Karina Marshall-Goebel, Ph.D., was added as co-investigator.
Project Information: Grant/Contract No. Internal Project 
Responsible Center: NASA JSC 
Grant Monitor: Norsk, Peter  
Center Contact:  
Peter.norsk@nasa.gov 
Solicitation / Funding Source: 2011 Crew Health NNJ11ZSA002NA 
Grant/Contract No.: Internal Project 
Project Type: FLIGHT 
Flight Program: ISS 
TechPort: No 
No. of Post Docs:
No. of PhD Candidates:
No. of Master's Candidates:
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:
No. of PhD Degrees:
No. of Master's Degrees:
No. of Bachelor's Degrees:
Human Research Program Elements: (1) HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Human Research Program Risks: (1) CVD:Risk of Spaceflight Induced Cardiovascular Disease (IRP Rev L)
(2) SANS:Risk of Spaceflight Associated Neuro-ocular Syndrome (IRP Rev I)
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) CVD-101:To determine whether long-duration weightlessness induces cardiovascular structural and functional changes and/or oxidative stress & damage (OSaD)/inflammation, that can contribute to development of disease (IRP Rev L)
(2) SANS-101:Determine the relationship between fluid shifts (intravascular, interstitial, CSF) and ocular manifestations in astronauts during spaceflight (IRP Rev M)
Flight Assignment/Project Notes: ISS

NOTE: End date changed to 1/29/2021 per J. McFather/HRP JSC (Ed., 10/15/18)

NOTE: End date is 9/30/2018 per PI (Ed., 7/8/15)

NOTE: Risk/Gap changes per IRP Rev E (Ed., 3/24/14)

Task Description: The central objective of the proposed work is to characterize the magnitude of the headward fluid shift during long duration space flight and to measure the subsequent compartmentalization of this fluid. The second objective is to correlate in-flight alterations of eye structure, ocular vascular parameters, and vision with headward fluid shifts, vascular dimensions, and flow patterns. Finally, the third objective is to determine systemic and ocular factors of individual susceptibility to the development of these inflight alterations.

In order to determine the effect of space flight on the headward fluid shift and subsequent redistribution across fluid compartments, biochemical, ultrasound, and other non-invasive cardiovascular measures will be performed before launch, during flight, and after landing. Total body water, extracellular, and intracellular fluid volume will be determined by biochemical dilution techniques. Ultrasound will be used to assess upper vs. lower body interstitial fluid and vascular flow and structure changes, ocular dimensions and optic nerve sheath diameter, and jugular venous pressure. Near infrared spectroscopy will be used to measure lower vs. upper body local tissue hydration, and total peripheral resistance will be calculated from noninvasively acquired blood pressure and cardiac output.

It is currently unclear why only some astronauts experience vision disturbances with space flight. It is hypothesized that astronauts respond differently to the fluid shift inflight and that this impacts changes in ocular structure and function changes. The goal of this study is to test this hypothesis. In doing so, this proposal directly addresses the Integrated Research Plan Gap Cardiovascular (CV)7: How are fluids redistributed in-flight? and Gap Vision Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP)1: What is the etiology of visual acuity and ocular structural and function changes seen in-flight and post-flight? The research proposed here will determine the effect of long duration space flight on fluid shifts and subsequent redistribution across fluid compartments and attempt to discern the contribution of these adaptations to changes in ocular structure and function.

NOTE: This study was merged with investigations from Dr. Alan Hargens (Fluid distribution before, during and after prolonged space flight) and Dr. Scott Dulchavsky (Microgravity associated compartmental equilibration) resulting in a comprehensive study titled “Fluid Shifts Before, During and After Prolonged Space Flight and Their Association with Intracranial Pressure and Visual Impairment” (short title: Fluid Shifts).

Research Impact/Earth Benefits: An early hypothesis considered elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) as a cause for space flight associated neuro-ocular syndrome. Because of this, novel noninvasive ICP techniques, included tympanic membrane displacement and otoacoustic emissions are being investigated to determine ICP changes associated with space flight. Knowledge gained from this study may inform medical professionals treating and studying patients suffering from idiopathic intracranial hypertension, a debilitating condition with some characteristics in common with that experienced by astronauts.

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2019 
Task Progress: Within this reporting period, post-flight testing (10, 45, and 180 days after landing) was completed on two subjects. To date, all pre/in/postflight data collection has been completed on the first 10 subjects for this experiment.

Within this reporting period, the three final subjects were pitched and have consented to participate in this experiment. Pre-flight baseline data collection is complete on two of these subjects.

Four presentations were made at the Human Research Program Investigators' Workshop in Galveston, including an oral presentation during the Spaceflight Associated Neuro-ocular Syndrome session.

Preliminary results from this investigation have been shared with the Human Health and Countermeasures Element, which have informed the Risk status and guided other grant solicitations.

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 08/30/2021) 

Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
 None in FY 2019
Project Title:  Distribution of Body Fluids during Long Duration Space Flight and Subsequent Effects on Intraocular Pressure and Vision Disturbance (PI: Stenger) Reduce
Images: icon  Fiscal Year: FY 2017 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Start Date: 10/01/2012  
End Date: 01/29/2021  
Task Last Updated: 07/21/2016 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Stenger, Michael  Ph.D. / NASA Johnson Space Center 
Address:  SK3/Biomedical Research and Environmental Sciences Division 
 
Houston , TX 77058 
Email: michael.b.stenger@nasa.gov 
Phone: 281-483-1311  
Congressional District: 22 
Web:  
Organization Type: NASA CENTER 
Organization Name: NASA Johnson Space Center 
Joint Agency:  
Comments: NOTE Aug 2018: Previously with KBRwyle at Johnson Space Center  
Co-Investigator(s)
Affiliation: 
Johnston, Smith  M.D. NASA Johnson Space Center 
Lee, Stuart  Ph.D. Wyle Laboratories, Inc. 
Martin, David  M.S. Wyle Laboratories, Inc. 
Ploutz-Snyder, Robert  Ph.D. Universities Space Research Association, Columbia 
Smith, Scott  Ph.D. NASA Johnson Space Center 
Soller, Babs  Ph.D. Reflectance Medical Inc. 
Westby, Christian  Ph.D. Universities Space Research Association, Columbia 
Laurie, Steven  Ph.D. Wyle Laboratories, Inc. 
Key Personnel Changes / Previous PI: October 2014 report: Steven S. Laurie, Ph.D., was added as co-investigator. Steven Platts, Ph.D., is no longer CoInvestigator as of November 2014.
Project Information: Grant/Contract No. Internal Project 
Responsible Center: NASA JSC 
Grant Monitor: Norsk, Peter  
Center Contact:  
Peter.norsk@nasa.gov 
Solicitation / Funding Source: 2011 Crew Health NNJ11ZSA002NA 
Grant/Contract No.: Internal Project 
Project Type: FLIGHT 
Flight Program: ISS 
TechPort: No 
No. of Post Docs:
No. of PhD Candidates:
No. of Master's Candidates:
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:
No. of PhD Degrees:
No. of Master's Degrees:
No. of Bachelor's Degrees:
Human Research Program Elements: (1) HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Human Research Program Risks: (1) CVD:Risk of Spaceflight Induced Cardiovascular Disease (IRP Rev L)
(2) SANS:Risk of Spaceflight Associated Neuro-ocular Syndrome (IRP Rev I)
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) CVD-101:To determine whether long-duration weightlessness induces cardiovascular structural and functional changes and/or oxidative stress & damage (OSaD)/inflammation, that can contribute to development of disease (IRP Rev L)
(2) SANS-101:Determine the relationship between fluid shifts (intravascular, interstitial, CSF) and ocular manifestations in astronauts during spaceflight (IRP Rev M)
Flight Assignment/Project Notes: ISS

NOTE: End date changed to 1/29/2021 per J. McFather/HRP JSC (Ed., 10/15/18)

NOTE: End date is 9/30/2018 per PI (Ed., 7/8/15)

NOTE: Risk/Gap changes per IRP Rev E (Ed., 3/24/14)

Task Description: The central objective of the proposed work is to characterize the magnitude of the headward fluid shift during long duration space flight and to measure the subsequent compartmentalization of this fluid. The second objective is to correlate in-flight alterations of eye structure, ocular vascular parameters, and vision with headward fluid shifts, vascular dimensions, and flow patterns. Finally, the third objective is to determine systemic and ocular factors of individual susceptibility to the development of ICP (instracranial pressure) elevation and/or vision alterations.

In order to determine the effect of space flight on the headward fluid shift and subsequent redistribution across fluid compartments, biochemical, ultrasound, and other non-invasive cardiovascular measures will be performed before launch, during flight, and after landing. Total body water, extracellular, and intracellular fluid volume will be determined by biochemical dilution techniques. Ultrasound will be used to assess upper vs. lower body interstitial fluid and vascular flow and structure changes, ocular dimensions and optic nerve sheath diameter, and jugular venous pressure. Near infrared spectroscopy will be used to measure lower vs. upper body local tissue hydration, and total peripheral resistance will be calculated from noninvasively acquired blood pressure and cardiac output.

It is currently unclear why only some astronauts experience vision disturbances with space flight. It is hypothesized that astronauts respond differently to the fluid shift in-flight and that this impacts changes in ocular structure and function changes. The goal of this study is to test this hypothesis. In doing so, this proposal directly addresses the Integrated Research Plan Gap Cardiovascular (CV)7: How are fluids redistributed in-flight? and Gap Vision Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP)1: What is the etiology of visual acuity and ocular structural and function changes seen in-flight and post-flight? The research proposed here will determine the effect of long duration space flight on fluid shifts and subsequent redistribution across fluid compartments and attempt to discern the contribution of these adaptations to changes in ocular structure and function.

NOTE: This study was merged with investigations from Dr. Alan Hargens (Fluid distribution before, during and after prolonged space flight) and Dr. Scott Dulchavsky (Microgravity associated compartmental equilibration) resulting in a comprehensive study titled “Fluid Shifts Before, During and After Prolonged Space Flight and Their Association with Intracranial Pressure and Visual Impairment” (short title: Fluid Shifts).

Research Impact/Earth Benefits: Knowledge gained from this study may inform medical professionals treating and studying patients suffering from idiopathic intracranial hypertension, a debilitating condition with some characteristics in common with that experienced by astronauts.

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2017 
Task Progress: We have made significant progress over the past year in all dimensions of the Fluid Shifts (FS) experiment. To date the team has performed preflight baseline data collection on seven crewmembers, completed three inflight sessions, and one postflight session for the two One Year Mission crewmembers, and concomitantly supported training activities for upcoming FS subjects. Four subjects are currently inflight.

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 08/30/2021) 

Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
 None in FY 2017
Project Title:  Distribution of Body Fluids during Long Duration Space Flight and Subsequent Effects on Intraocular Pressure and Vision Disturbance (PI: Stenger) Reduce
Images: icon  Fiscal Year: FY 2016 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Start Date: 10/01/2012  
End Date: 09/30/2018  
Task Last Updated: 07/14/2015 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Stenger, Michael  Ph.D. / NASA Johnson Space Center 
Address:  SK3/Biomedical Research and Environmental Sciences Division 
 
Houston , TX 77058 
Email: michael.b.stenger@nasa.gov 
Phone: 281-483-1311  
Congressional District: 22 
Web:  
Organization Type: NASA CENTER 
Organization Name: NASA Johnson Space Center 
Joint Agency:  
Comments: NOTE Aug 2018: Previously with KBRwyle at Johnson Space Center  
Co-Investigator(s)
Affiliation: 
Johnston, Smith  NASA Johnson Space Center 
Lee, Stuart  Wyle Laboratories, Inc. 
Martin, David  Wyle Laboratories, Inc. 
Ploutz-Snyder, Robert  Universities Space Research Association, Columbia 
Smith, Scott  NASA Johnson Space Center 
Soller, Babs  Reflectance Medical Inc. 
Westby, Christian  Universities Space Research Association, Columbia 
Laurie, Steven  Ph.D. Wyle 
Key Personnel Changes / Previous PI: October 2014 report: Steven S. Laurie, Ph.D., was added as co-investigator. Steven Platts, Ph.D., is no longer CoInvestigator as of November 2014.
Project Information: Grant/Contract No. Internal Project 
Responsible Center: NASA JSC 
Grant Monitor: Norsk, Peter  
Center Contact:  
Peter.norsk@nasa.gov 
Solicitation / Funding Source: 2011 Crew Health NNJ11ZSA002NA 
Grant/Contract No.: Internal Project 
Project Type: FLIGHT 
Flight Program: ISS 
TechPort: No 
No. of Post Docs:
No. of PhD Candidates:
No. of Master's Candidates:
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:
No. of PhD Degrees:
No. of Master's Degrees:
No. of Bachelor's Degrees:
Human Research Program Elements: (1) HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Human Research Program Risks: (1) CVD:Risk of Spaceflight Induced Cardiovascular Disease (IRP Rev L)
(2) SANS:Risk of Spaceflight Associated Neuro-ocular Syndrome (IRP Rev I)
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) CVD-101:To determine whether long-duration weightlessness induces cardiovascular structural and functional changes and/or oxidative stress & damage (OSaD)/inflammation, that can contribute to development of disease (IRP Rev L)
(2) SANS-101:Determine the relationship between fluid shifts (intravascular, interstitial, CSF) and ocular manifestations in astronauts during spaceflight (IRP Rev M)
Flight Assignment/Project Notes: ISS

NOTE: End date is 9/30/2018 per PI (Ed., 7/8/15)

NOTE: Risk/Gap changes per IRP Rev E (Ed., 3/24/14)

Task Description: The central objective of the proposed work is to determine the magnitude of the headward fluid shift during long duration space flight and to measure the subsequent compartmentalization of this fluid. The second objective is to determine if individual responses to this space flight-induced fluid shift are correlated with the individual differences in the space flight-induced change in intraocular pressure and visual acuity. Finally, the third objective is to compare the space flight fluid shift/distribution with that which occurs in head-down tilt bed rest, a terrestrial analog of space flight deconditioning.

In order to determine the effect of space flight on the headward fluid shift and subsequent redistribution across fluid compartments, biochemical, ultrasound, and other non-invasive cardiovascular measures will be performed before launch, during flight, and after landing. Total body water, extracellular, and intracellular fluid volume will be determined by biochemical dilution techniques. Ultrasound will be used to assess upper vs. lower body interstitial fluid and vein diameter changes, cerebral blood flow, optic nerve sheath diameter, and central venous pressure. Near infrared spectroscopy will be used to measure lower vs. upper body local tissue hydration, and total peripheral resistance will be calculated from noninvasively acquired blood pressure and cardiac output.

It is currently unclear why only some astronauts experience vision disturbances with space flight. It is hypothesized that astronauts respond differently to the fluid shift in-flight and that this impacts changes in intraocular / intracranial pressure and vision changes. The goal of this study is to test this hypothesis. In doing so, this proposal directly addresses the Integrated Research Plan Gap Cardiovascular (CV)7: How are fluids redistributed in-flight? and Gap Vision Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP)1: What is the etiology of visual acuity and ocular structural and function changes seen in-flight and post-flight? The research proposed here will determine the effect of long duration space flight on fluid shifts and subsequent redistribution across fluid compartments and attempt to discern the contribution of these adaptations to changes in intraocular / intracranial pressure and vision disturbances.

NOTE: This study was merged with investigations from Dr. Alan Hargens (Fluid distribution before, during and after prolonged space flight) and Dr. Scott Dulchavsky (Microgravity associated compartmental equilibration) resulting in a comprehensive study titled “Fluid Shifts Before, During and After Prolonged Space Flight and Their Association with Intracranial Pressure and Visual Impairment” (short title: Fluid Shifts).

Research Impact/Earth Benefits: Knowledge gained from this study may inform medical professionals treating and studying patients suffering from idiopathic intracranial hypertension, a debilitating condition with some characteristics in common with that experienced by astronauts.

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2016 
Task Progress: PI team personnel, along with the ISSMP (International Space Station (ISS) Medical Project) Flight Projects manager, travelled to Moscow in April 2015 to finalize the procedures and logistics of performing operations in the Russian segment.

Testing and training have been initiated to enable “free-floating” of the Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) device for in-flight measurements. Prior work by members of our group tested the feasibility of using the OCT scanner in free-float (without the use of the chin rest and stage); parabolic flights were conducted in November 2013 that established that this mode was feasible. This information opened up options for scanning locations other than the Maintenance Work Area (MWA) which would include scanning in the Russian Service Module while in Chibis. An inflight free-float practice run was performed in April 2015 prior to inflight data collection in May 2015.

Three feasibility subjects were studied in the fall of 2014, allowing the Principal Investigator Team to finalize the study protocol, maximizing data collection and crew time efficiency. All training sessions and preflight baseline data collection (BDC) have been completed for both one year mission crewmembers (including one cosmonaut); training and preflight BDC has also been completed for the one year mission US backup crewmember and ground-based “TWINS” study participant. These include MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), dilution measures, ultrasound, OCT, tonometry, NIRS (near-infrared spectroscopy), CCFP (cerebral and cochlear fluid pressure), and OAE (otoacoustic emission) measures. The early inflight (FD45) testing on our first two crewmembers, including dilution measures and baseline imaging measures, were performed in the USOS segment, followed by three days of testing in the Russian segment while utilizing the Chibis lower body negative pressure (LBNP) device.

Our team attended the NASA Human Research Program (HRP) Investigators’ Workshop in Galveston, TX in January 2015, presenting a poster on the Fluid Shifts (FS) project and participating in many VIIP related sessions and discussions. We also presented a project status at the Aerospace Medical Association Annual Meeting in Orlando, FL, in May of 2015 during a VIIP panel presentation.

PI team personnel performed multiple interviews/media events for the Fluid Shifts project. In February, for Lori Meggs from Space Station Live; in March with Lorie Abadie, Chuck Lloyd and Amy Blanchett from Education and Outreach; in April with Pat Ryan from Space Station Livem; in June with Stephanie Schierholz and Julie Robinson at the Kennedy Space Center for the SpaceX CRS-7 pre-launch Tech Briefing.

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 08/30/2021) 

Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
 None in FY 2016
Project Title:  Distribution of Body Fluids during Long Duration Space Flight and Subsequent Effects on Intraocular Pressure and Vision Disturbance (PI: Stenger) Reduce
Images: icon  Fiscal Year: FY 2015 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Start Date: 10/01/2012  
End Date: 09/30/2018  
Task Last Updated: 10/29/2014 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Stenger, Michael  Ph.D. / NASA Johnson Space Center 
Address:  SK3/Biomedical Research and Environmental Sciences Division 
 
Houston , TX 77058 
Email: michael.b.stenger@nasa.gov 
Phone: 281-483-1311  
Congressional District: 22 
Web:  
Organization Type: NASA CENTER 
Organization Name: NASA Johnson Space Center 
Joint Agency:  
Comments: NOTE Aug 2018: Previously with KBRwyle at Johnson Space Center  
Co-Investigator(s)
Affiliation: 
Johnston, Smith  NASA Johnson Space Center 
Lee, Stuart  Wyle Laboratories, Inc. 
Martin, David  Wyle Laboratories, Inc. 
Ploutz-Snyder, Robert  Universities Space Research Association, Columbia 
Smith, Scott  NASA Johnson Space Center 
Soller, Babs  Reflectance Medical Inc. 
Westby, Christian  Universities Space Research Association, Columbia 
Laurie, Steven S. Ph.D. Wyle 
Key Personnel Changes / Previous PI: October 2014 report: Steven S. Laurie, Ph.D., was added as co-investigator. Steven Platts, Ph.D., is no longer CoInvestigator as of November 2014.
Project Information: Grant/Contract No. Internal Project 
Responsible Center: NASA JSC 
Grant Monitor: Norsk, Peter  
Center Contact:  
Peter.norsk@nasa.gov 
Solicitation / Funding Source: 2011 Crew Health NNJ11ZSA002NA 
Grant/Contract No.: Internal Project 
Project Type: FLIGHT 
Flight Program: ISS 
TechPort: No 
No. of Post Docs:
No. of PhD Candidates:
No. of Master's Candidates:
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:
No. of PhD Degrees:
No. of Master's Degrees:
No. of Bachelor's Degrees:
Human Research Program Elements: (1) HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Human Research Program Risks: (1) CVD:Risk of Spaceflight Induced Cardiovascular Disease (IRP Rev L)
(2) SANS:Risk of Spaceflight Associated Neuro-ocular Syndrome (IRP Rev I)
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) CVD-101:To determine whether long-duration weightlessness induces cardiovascular structural and functional changes and/or oxidative stress & damage (OSaD)/inflammation, that can contribute to development of disease (IRP Rev L)
(2) SANS-101:Determine the relationship between fluid shifts (intravascular, interstitial, CSF) and ocular manifestations in astronauts during spaceflight (IRP Rev M)
Flight Assignment/Project Notes: ISS

NOTE: End date is 9/30/2018 per PI (Ed., 7/8/15)

NOTE: Risk/Gap changes per IRP Rev E (Ed., 3/24/14)

Task Description: The central objective of the proposed work is to determine the magnitude of the headward fluid shift during long duration space flight and to measure the subsequent compartmentalization of this fluid. The second objective is to determine if individual responses to this space flight-induced fluid shift are correlated with the individual differences in the space flight-induced change in intraocular pressure and visual acuity. Finally, the third objective is to compare the space flight fluid shift/distribution with that which occurs in head-down tilt bed rest, a terrestrial analog of space flight deconditioning.

In order to determine the effect of space flight on the headward fluid shift and subsequent redistribution across fluid compartments, biochemical, ultrasound, and other non-invasive cardiovascular measures will be performed before launch, during flight, and after landing. Total body water, extracellular, and intracellular fluid volume will be determined by biochemical dilution techniques. Ultrasound will be used to assess upper vs. lower body interstitial fluid and vein diameter changes, cerebral blood flow, optic nerve sheath diameter, and central venous pressure. Near infrared spectroscopy will be used to measure lower vs. upper body local tissue hydration, and total peripheral resistance will be calculated from noninvasively acquired blood pressure and cardiac output.

It is currently unclear why only some astronauts experience vision disturbances with space flight. It is hypothesized that astronauts respond differently to the fluid shift in-flight and that this impacts changes in intraocular / intracranial pressure and vision changes. The goal of this study is to test this hypothesis. In doing so, this proposal directly addresses the Integrated Research Plan Gap Cardiovascular (CV)7: How are fluids redistributed in-flight? and Gap Vision Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP)1: What is the etiology of visual acuity and ocular structural and function changes seen in-flight and post-flight? The research proposed here will determine the effect of long duration space flight on fluid shifts and subsequent redistribution across fluid compartments and attempt to discern the contribution of these adaptations to changes in intraocular / intracranial pressure and vision disturbances.

NOTE: This study was merged with investigations from Dr. Alan Hargens (Fluid distribution before, during and after prolonged space flight) and Dr. Scott Dulchavsky (Microgravity associated compartmental equilibration) resulting in a comprehensive study titled “Fluid Shifts Before, During and After Prolonged Space Flight and Their Association with Intracranial Pressure and Visual Impairment” (short title: Fluid Shifts).

Research Impact/Earth Benefits: Knowledge gained from this study may inform medical professionals treating and studying patients suffering from idiopathic intracranial hypertension, a debilitating condition with some characteristics in common with that experienced by astronauts.

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2015 
Task Progress: This study was merged with investigations from Dr. Alan Hargens (Fluid distribution before, during and after prolonged space flight) and Dr. Scott Dulchavsky (Microgravity associated compartmental equilibration) resulting in a comprehensive study titled “Fluid Shifts Before, During and After Prolonged Space Flight and Their Association with Intracranial Pressure and Visual Impairment” (short title: Fluid Shifts).

The first year of this project was spent merging these studies together in such a way as to maintain original specific aims from original protocols without impacting quality of science. The combined study has been approved by the Health and Human Countermeasures Element and has received Institutional Review Board approval and completed the International Space Station Medical Projects (ISSMP) feasibility assessment process. Currently, this study is under review by the Science Management Panel for Select for Flight. This study has been pitched to the one-year crew, which, if selected, will be the first crew to participate in this study.

In the second year of this project, all necessary boards approved flight status and experiment hardware was flight certified. Baseline MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) data collection was completed on the first two subjects, and L-90 preflight BDC (baseline data collection) was completed on one subject.

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 08/30/2021) 

Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
 None in FY 2015
Project Title:  Distribution of Body Fluids during Long Duration Space Flight and Subsequent Effects on Intraocular Pressure and Vision Disturbance (PI: Stenger) Reduce
Images: icon  Fiscal Year: FY 2014 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Start Date: 10/01/2012  
End Date: 09/30/2015  
Task Last Updated: 09/03/2013 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Stenger, Michael  Ph.D. / NASA Johnson Space Center 
Address:  SK3/Biomedical Research and Environmental Sciences Division 
 
Houston , TX 77058 
Email: michael.b.stenger@nasa.gov 
Phone: 281-483-1311  
Congressional District: 22 
Web:  
Organization Type: NASA CENTER 
Organization Name: NASA Johnson Space Center 
Joint Agency:  
Comments: NOTE Aug 2018: Previously with KBRwyle at Johnson Space Center  
Co-Investigator(s)
Affiliation: 
Johnston, Smith  NASA Johnson Space Center 
Lee, Stuart  Wyle Laboratories, Inc. 
Martin, David  Wyle Laboratories, Inc. 
Platts, Steven  NASA Johnson Space Center 
Ploutz-Snyder, Robert  Universities Space Research Association, Columbia 
Smith, Scott  NASA Johnson Space Center 
Soller, Babs  Reflectance Medical Inc. 
Westby, Christian  Universities Space Research Association, Columbia 
Project Information: Grant/Contract No. Internal Project 
Responsible Center: NASA JSC 
Grant Monitor: Norsk, Peter  
Center Contact:  
Peter.norsk@nasa.gov 
Solicitation / Funding Source: 2011 Crew Health NNJ11ZSA002NA 
Grant/Contract No.: Internal Project 
Project Type: FLIGHT 
Flight Program: ISS 
TechPort: No 
No. of Post Docs:
No. of PhD Candidates:
No. of Master's Candidates:
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:
No. of PhD Degrees:
No. of Master's Degrees:
No. of Bachelor's Degrees:
Human Research Program Elements: (1) HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Human Research Program Risks: (1) CVD:Risk of Spaceflight Induced Cardiovascular Disease (IRP Rev L)
(2) SANS:Risk of Spaceflight Associated Neuro-ocular Syndrome (IRP Rev I)
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) CVD-101:To determine whether long-duration weightlessness induces cardiovascular structural and functional changes and/or oxidative stress & damage (OSaD)/inflammation, that can contribute to development of disease (IRP Rev L)
(2) SANS-101:Determine the relationship between fluid shifts (intravascular, interstitial, CSF) and ocular manifestations in astronauts during spaceflight (IRP Rev M)
Flight Assignment/Project Notes: ISS

NOTE: Risk/Gap changes per IRP Rev E (Ed., 3/24/14)

Task Description: The central objective of the proposed work is to determine the magnitude of the headward fluid shift during long duration space flight and to measure the subsequent compartmentalization of this fluid. The second objective is to determine if individual responses to this space flight-induced fluid shift are correlated with the individual differences in the space flight-induced change in intraocular pressure and visual acuity. Finally, the third objective is to compare the space flight fluid shift/distribution with that which occurs in head-down tilt bed rest, a terrestrial analog of space flight deconditioning.

In order to determine the effect of space flight on the headward fluid shift and subsequent redistribution across fluid compartments, biochemical, ultrasound and other non-invasive cardiovascular measures will be performed before launch, during flight and after landing. Total body water, extracellular and intracellular fluid volume will be determined by biochemical dilution techniques. Ultrasound will be used to assess upper vs. lower body interstitial fluid and vein diameter changes, cerebral blood flow, optic nerve sheath diameter and central venous pressure. Near infrared spectroscopy will be used to measure lower vs. upper body local tissue hydration, and total peripheral resistance will be calculated from noninvasively acquired blood pressure and cardiac output.

It is currently unclear why only some astronauts experience vision disturbances with space flight. It is hypothesized that astronauts respond differently to the fluid shift in-flight and that this impacts changes in intraocular / intracranial pressure and vision changes. The goal of this study is to test this hypothesis. In doing so, this proposal directly addresses the Integrated Research Plan Gap CV7: How are fluids redistributed in-flight? and Gap VIIP1: What is the etiology of visual acuity and ocular structural and function changes seen in-flight and post-flight? The research proposed here will determine the effect of long duration space flight on fluid shifts and subsequent redistribution across fluid compartments and attempt to discern the contribution of these adaptations to changes in intraocular / intracranial pressure and vision disturbances.

NOTE: This study was merged with investigations from Dr. Alan Hargens (Fluid distribution before, during and after prolonged space flight) and Dr. Scott Dulchavsky (Microgravity associated compartmental equilibration) resulting in a comprehensive study titled “Fluid Shifts Before, During and After Prolonged Space Flight and Their Association with Intracranial Pressure and Visual Impairment” (short title: Fluid Shifts).

Research Impact/Earth Benefits: Knowledge gained from this study may inform medical professionals treating and studying patients suffering from idiopathic intracranial hypertension, a debilitating condition with some characteristics in common with that experienced by astronauts.

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2014 
Task Progress: This study was merged with investigations from Dr. Alan Hargens (Fluid distribution before, during and after prolonged space flight) and Dr. Scott Dulchavsky (Microgravity associated compartmental equilibration) resulting in a comprehensive study titled “Fluid Shifts Before, During and After Prolonged Space Flight and Their Association with Intracranial Pressure and Visual Impairment” (short title: Fluid Shifts).

This past year was spent merging these studies together in such a way as to maintain original specific aims from original protocols without impacting quality of science. The combined study has been approved by the Health and Human Countermeasures Element and has received Institutional Review Board approval and completed the ISSMP feasibility assessment process. Currently, this study is under review by the Science Management Panel for Select for Flight. This study has been pitched to the one-year crew, which, if selected, will be the first crew to participate in this study.

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 08/30/2021) 

Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
 None in FY 2014
Project Title:  Distribution of Body Fluids during Long Duration Space Flight and Subsequent Effects on Intraocular Pressure and Vision Disturbance (PI: Stenger) Reduce
Images: icon  Fiscal Year: FY 2013 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Start Date: 10/01/2012  
End Date: 09/30/2015  
Task Last Updated: 11/14/2012 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Stenger, Michael  Ph.D. / NASA Johnson Space Center 
Address:  SK3/Biomedical Research and Environmental Sciences Division 
 
Houston , TX 77058 
Email: michael.b.stenger@nasa.gov 
Phone: 281-483-1311  
Congressional District: 22 
Web:  
Organization Type: NASA CENTER 
Organization Name: NASA Johnson Space Center 
Joint Agency:  
Comments: NOTE Aug 2018: Previously with KBRwyle at Johnson Space Center  
Co-Investigator(s)
Affiliation: 
Johnston, Smith  NASA Johnson Space Center 
Lee, Stuart  Wyle Laboratories, Inc. 
Martin, David  Wyle Laboratories, Inc. 
Platts, Steven  NASA Johnson Space Center 
Ploutz-Snyder, Robert  Universities Space Research Association, Columbia 
Smith, Scott  NASA Johnson Space Center 
Soller, Babs  Reflectance Medical Inc. 
Westby, Christian  Universities Space Research Association, Columbia 
Project Information: Grant/Contract No. Internal Project 
Responsible Center: NASA JSC 
Grant Monitor: Norsk, Peter  
Center Contact:  
Peter.norsk@nasa.gov 
Solicitation / Funding Source: 2011 Crew Health NNJ11ZSA002NA 
Grant/Contract No.: Internal Project 
Project Type: FLIGHT 
Flight Program: ISS 
TechPort: No 
No. of Post Docs:  
No. of PhD Candidates:  
No. of Master's Candidates:  
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:  
No. of PhD Degrees:  
No. of Master's Degrees:  
No. of Bachelor's Degrees:  
Human Research Program Elements: (1) HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Human Research Program Risks: (1) CVD:Risk of Spaceflight Induced Cardiovascular Disease (IRP Rev L)
(2) SANS:Risk of Spaceflight Associated Neuro-ocular Syndrome (IRP Rev I)
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) CVD-101:To determine whether long-duration weightlessness induces cardiovascular structural and functional changes and/or oxidative stress & damage (OSaD)/inflammation, that can contribute to development of disease (IRP Rev L)
(2) SANS-101:Determine the relationship between fluid shifts (intravascular, interstitial, CSF) and ocular manifestations in astronauts during spaceflight (IRP Rev M)
Flight Assignment/Project Notes: ISS

Task Description: The central objective of the proposed work is to determine the magnitude of the headward fluid shift during long duration space flight and to measure the subsequent compartmentalization of this fluid. The second objective is to determine if individual responses to this space flight-induced fluid shift are correlated with the individual differences in the space flight-induced change in intraocular pressure and visual acuity. Finally, the third objective is to compare the space flight fluid shift/distribution with that which occurs in head-down tilt bed rest, a terrestrial analog of space flight deconditioning.

In order to determine the effect of space flight on the headward fluid shift and subsequent redistribution across fluid compartments, biochemical, ultrasound and other non-invasive cardiovascular measures will be performed before launch, during flight and after landing. Total body water, extracellular and intracellular fluid volume will be determined by biochemical dilution techniques. Ultrasound will be used to assess upper vs. lower body interstitial fluid and vein diameter changes, cerebral blood flow, optic nerve sheath diameter and central venous pressure. Near infrared spectroscopy will be used to measure lower vs. upper body local tissue hydration, and total peripheral resistance will be calculated from noninvasively acquired blood pressure and cardiac output.

It is currently unclear why only some astronauts experience vision disturbances with space flight. It is hypothesized that astronauts respond differently to the fluid shift in-flight and that this impacts changes in intraocular / intracranial pressure and vision changes. The goal of this study is to test this hypothesis. In doing so, this proposal directly addresses the Integrated Research Plan Gap CV7: How are fluids redistributed in-flight? and Gap VIIP1: What is the etiology of visual acuity and ocular structural and function changes seen in-flight and post-flight? The research proposed here will determine the effect of long duration space flight on fluid shifts and subsequent redistribution across fluid compartments and attempt to discern the contribution of these adaptations to changes in intraocular / intracranial pressure and vision disturbances.

NOTE: This study was merged with investigations from Dr. Alan Hargens (Fluid distribution before, during and after prolonged space flight) and Dr. Scott Dulchavsky (Microgravity associated compartmental equilibration) resulting in a comprehensive study titled “Fluid Shifts Before, During and After Prolonged Space Flight and Their Association with Intracranial Pressure and Visual Impairment” (short title: Fluid Shifts).

Research Impact/Earth Benefits: 0

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2013 
Task Progress: New project for FY2013.

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 08/30/2021) 

Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
 None in FY 2013