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Project Title:  Evaluating Resistive Exercise as a Long-term Countermeasure for Spaceflight-induced Bone Loss Using Calcium Isotopes Reduce
Images: icon  Fiscal Year: FY 2020 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Start Date: 03/28/2019  
End Date: 06/12/2020  
Task Last Updated: 09/10/2021 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Romaniello, Stephen  Ph.D. / Arizona State University 
Address:  School of Earth and Space Exploration 
Psf-686, Mail Code 1414 
Tempe , AZ 85287-1404 
Email: sromanie@asu.edu 
Phone: 860-462-6906  
Congressional District:
Web:  
Organization Type: UNIVERSITY 
Organization Name: Arizona State University 
Joint Agency:  
Comments:  
Co-Investigator(s)
Affiliation: 
Anbar, Ariel  Ph.D. Arizona State University 
Smith, Scott  Ph.D. NASA Johnson Space Center 
Zwart, Sara  Ph.D. University Of Texas, Galveston 
Project Information: Grant/Contract No. 80NSSC19K0519 
Responsible Center: NASA JSC 
Grant Monitor: Stenger, Michael  
Center Contact: 281-483-1311 
michael.b.stenger@nasa.gov 
Solicitation / Funding Source: 2017-2018 HERO 80JSC017N0001-BPBA Topics in Biological, Physiological, and Behavioral Adaptations to Spaceflight. Appendix C 
Grant/Contract No.: 80NSSC19K0519 
Project Type: FLIGHT 
Flight Program: ISS 
TechPort: No 
No. of Post Docs:  
No. of PhD Candidates:  
No. of Master's Candidates:  
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:  
No. of PhD Degrees:  
No. of Master's Degrees:  
No. of Bachelor's Degrees:  
Human Research Program Elements: (1) HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Human Research Program Risks: (1) Bone Fracture:Risk of Bone Fracture due to Spaceflight-induced Changes to Bone (IRP Rev M)
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) Osteo03:We need a validated clinically relevant method for assessing the effect of spaceflight on osteoporosis or fracture risk in long-duration astronauts (IRP Rev E)
(2) Osteo05:We need an inflight capability to monitor bone turnover and bone mass changes during spaceflight (IRP Rev E)
Flight Assignment/Project Notes: NOTE September 2021: PI is no longer working on the project. Project will continue in the near future with Gwyneth Gordon, Ph.D., as the new principal investigator.

Task Description: NOTE September 2021: PI is no longer working on the project. Project will continue in the near future with Gwyneth Gordon, Ph.D., as the new principal investigator.

We have previously demonstrated that variations in naturally-occurring stable isotopes of calcium (Ca) in blood and urine can be used to monitor changes in net bone mineral balance (BMB) during bed rest and spaceflight, including crewmembers using resistive exercise and pharmaceutical interventions to prevent bone loss aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Here, we propose to build on our established dataset of Ca isotope variations and BMB in ISS crewmembers to include future crewmembers participating in the One-Year Mission Project. This proposal builds on a successful existing collaboration between researchers at Arizona State University (ASU) and Johnson Space Center (JSC) to study and apply the Ca isotope method as a bone biomarker.

The data to be obtained in the proposed project will characterize the trajectory of changes in crewmember BMB resulting from 2-12 months of spaceflight aboard the ISS and will provide a basis for extrapolation of expected changes in BMB and whole-body bone mineral content during missions extending 2-3 years in duration. Existing data from 6-month ISS missions suggest that crewmembers using the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) experience rapid net bone loss during the first 60 days of flight, but that the rate of bone loss slows during flight days 60-180. If this trend continues, little additional cumulative bone loss might be expected during extended missions, consistent with the principle of non-inferiority. Ca isotopes are uniquely suited to answer this question, since they are the only technique currently capable of providing a time series of quantitative estimates of net BMB from samples returned from a single spaceflight mission.

Our proposal falls under the "Musculoskeletal system" and "Food and nutrition" Human Research Program (HRP) research emphases, and specifically addresses Integrated Research Plan (IRP) Gap N7.1: "We need to identify the most important nutritional factors for musculoskeletal health," which states that "calcium isotope studies will help develop analytical tools to quantitate net calcium balance changes during and after flight."

Research Impact/Earth Benefits:

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2020 
Task Progress: NOTE September 2021: PI is no longer working on the project. Project will continue in the near future with Gwyneth Gordon, Ph.D., as the new principal investigator.

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: )  Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
 None in FY 2020
Project Title:  Evaluating Resistive Exercise as a Long-term Countermeasure for Spaceflight-induced Bone Loss Using Calcium Isotopes Reduce
Images: icon  Fiscal Year: FY 2019 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Start Date: 03/28/2019  
End Date: 06/12/2020  
Task Last Updated: 04/02/2019 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Romaniello, Stephen  Ph.D. / Arizona State University 
Address:  School of Earth and Space Exploration 
Psf-686, Mail Code 1414 
Tempe , AZ 85287-1404 
Email: sromanie@asu.edu 
Phone: 860-462-6906  
Congressional District:
Web:  
Organization Type: UNIVERSITY 
Organization Name: Arizona State University 
Joint Agency:  
Comments:  
Co-Investigator(s)
Affiliation: 
Anbar, Ariel  Ph.D. Arizona State University 
Smith, Scott  Ph.D. NASA Johnson Space Center 
Zwart, Sara  Ph.D. University Of Texas, Galveston 
Project Information: Grant/Contract No. 80NSSC19K0519 
Responsible Center: NASA JSC 
Grant Monitor: Norsk, Peter  
Center Contact:  
Peter.norsk@nasa.gov 
Solicitation / Funding Source: 2017-2018 HERO 80JSC017N0001-BPBA Topics in Biological, Physiological, and Behavioral Adaptations to Spaceflight. Appendix C 
Grant/Contract No.: 80NSSC19K0519 
Project Type: FLIGHT 
Flight Program: ISS 
TechPort: No 
No. of Post Docs:  
No. of PhD Candidates:  
No. of Master's Candidates:  
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:  
No. of PhD Degrees:  
No. of Master's Degrees:  
No. of Bachelor's Degrees:  
Human Research Program Elements: (1) HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Human Research Program Risks: (1) Bone Fracture:Risk of Bone Fracture due to Spaceflight-induced Changes to Bone (IRP Rev M)
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) Osteo03:We need a validated clinically relevant method for assessing the effect of spaceflight on osteoporosis or fracture risk in long-duration astronauts (IRP Rev E)
(2) Osteo05:We need an inflight capability to monitor bone turnover and bone mass changes during spaceflight (IRP Rev E)
Task Description: We have previously demonstrated that variations in naturally-occurring stable isotopes of calcium (Ca) in blood and urine can be used to monitor changes in net bone mineral balance (BMB) during bed rest and spaceflight, including crewmembers using resistive exercise and pharmaceutical interventions to prevent bone loss aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Here, we propose to build on our established dataset of Ca isotope variations and BMB in ISS crewmembers to include future crewmembers participating in the One-Year Mission Project. This proposal builds on a successful existing collaboration between researchers at Arizona State University (ASU) and Johnson Space Center (JSC) to study and apply the Ca isotope method as a bone biomarker.

The data to be obtained in the proposed project will characterize the trajectory of changes in crewmember BMB resulting from 2-12 months of spaceflight aboard the ISS and will provide a basis for extrapolation of expected changes in BMB and whole-body bone mineral content during missions extending 2-3 years in duration. Existing data from 6-month ISS missions suggest that crewmembers using the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) experience rapid net bone loss during the first 60 days of flight, but that the rate of bone loss slows during flight days 60-180. If this trend continues, little additional cumulative bone loss might be expected during extended missions, consistent with the principle of non-inferiority. Ca isotopes are uniquely suited to answer this question, since they are the only technique currently capable of providing a time series of quantitative estimates of net BMB from samples returned from a single spaceflight mission.

Our proposal falls under the "Musculoskeletal system" and "Food and nutrition" Human Research Program (HRP) research emphases, and specifically addresses Integrated Research Plan (IRP) Gap N7.1: "We need to identify the most important nutritional factors for musculoskeletal health," which states that "calcium isotope studies will help develop analytical tools to quantitate net calcium balance changes during and after flight."

Research Impact/Earth Benefits:

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2019 
Task Progress: New project for FY2019.

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: )  Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
 None in FY 2019