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Project Title:  Biomarkers as Predictors of Resiliency and Susceptibility to Stress in Space Flight--80NSSC20K0243 Reduce
Images: icon  Fiscal Year: FY 2020 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HFBP:Human Factors & Behavioral Performance (IRP Rev H) 
Start Date: 10/23/2019  
End Date: 10/22/2020  
Task Last Updated: 12/26/2019 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Goel, Namni  Ph.D. / Rush University Medical Center 
Address:  Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Biological Rhythms Research Laboratory 
1645 W. Jackson Blvd., Suite 425 
Chicago , IL 60612 
Email: namni_goel@rush.edu 
Phone: 312-563-4726  
Congressional District:
Web:  
Organization Type: UNIVERSITY 
Organization Name: Rush University Medical Center 
Joint Agency:  
Comments: NOTE: Formerly at the University of Pennsylvania until July 2019. 
Co-Investigator(s)
Affiliation: 
Basner, Mathias  M.D., Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania 
Bhatnagar, Seema  Ph.D. Children's Hospital of Philadelphia 
Dinges, David F. Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania 
Kirkpatrick, James  M.D. University of Washington 
Weljie, Aalim  Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania 
Project Information: Grant/Contract No. 80NSSC20K0243 
Responsible Center: NASA JSC 
Grant Monitor: Williams, Thomas  
Center Contact: 281-483-8773 
thomas.j.williams-1@nasa.gov 
Solicitation: 2013 HERO NNJ13ZSA002N-Crew Health (FLAGSHIP & NSBRI) 
Grant/Contract No.: 80NSSC20K0243 
Project Type: GROUND 
Flight Program:  
TechPort: No 
No. of Post Docs:  
No. of PhD Candidates:  
No. of Master's Candidates:  
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:  
No. of PhD Degrees:  
No. of Master's Degrees:  
No. of Bachelor's Degrees:  
Human Research Program Elements: (1) HFBP:Human Factors & Behavioral Performance (IRP Rev H)
Human Research Program Risks: (1) HFBP Bmed:Risk of Adverse Cognitive or Behavioral Conditions and Psychiatric Disorders (IRP Rev J)
 (2) HFBP Sleep:Risk of Performance Decrements and Adverse Health Outcomes Resulting from Sleep Loss, Circadian Desynchronization, and Work Overload (IRP Rev J)
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) CBS-Bmed03:We need to identify and quantify the key threats to and promoters of mission relevant behavioral health and performance during autonomous, long duration and/or long distance exploration missions (IRP Rev H)
 (2) Sleep Gap 04:We need to identify indicators of individual vulnerabilities and resiliencies to sleep loss and circadian rhythm disruption, to aid with individualized countermeasure regimens, for autonomous, long duration and/or distance exploration missions (IRP Rev E)
Task Description: NOTE: Continuation of "Biomarkers as Predictors of Resiliency and Susceptibility to Stress in Space Flight," grant NNX14AN49G, due to Principal Investigator (PI) move to Rush University from University of Pennsylvania in summer 2019, requiring issue of new grant.

This proposal is responsive to the NASA Behavioral Health and Performance gap (BMed5) to find individual characteristics that predict successful adaptation and performance in an isolated, confined, and extreme environment, especially for long duration missions. The project also relates to Human Research Program (HRP) Sleep Gap 4 to identify indicators of individual susceptibilities and resiliencies to sleep loss and circadian rhythm disruption, to aid with individualized countermeasure regimens, for autonomous, long duration, and/or distance exploration missions. The proposal is also responsive to BMed 1 and BMed 2, and Sleep Gap 2 and Sleep Gap 9. To address these gaps, this proposal will assess biomarkers as predictors of resiliency and susceptibility (individual differences) to performance stress and sleep loss using the HRP Human Exploration Research Analog (HERA) and the Hawaii Space Exploration Analog and Simulation (HI-SEAS) high fidelity space analog facilities. We will conduct a ground-based experiment—strongly anchored in our previous laboratory-based research—on N=32 healthy men and women (ages 26-55) in the HERA facility (short-duration analog) and on N=6 healthy men and women (ages 21-65) in the HI-SEAS facility (long-duration analog) to determine the predictive validity of a set of relevant, valid, and reliable biomarkers for distinguishing those who are more resilient versus those who are more susceptible to the adverse neurobehavioral effects of the combination of high performance demands and total sleep deprivation (TSD) stressors—two conditions commonly experienced in space flight. These biomarkers include the following: cardiovascular measures (blood pressure, heart rate and heart rate variability, stroke volume, and cardiac output), salivary cortisol, catecholamines (dopamine, noradrenaline, and adrenaline), an inflammatory marker (C-reactive protein; CRP), metabolomic markers (via unbiased metabolomics), and microRNAs (epigenetic markers). The project deliverable will be a countermeasure (set of diverse biomarkers) for distinguishing those who are more resilient versus those who are more susceptible to the adverse neurobehavioral effects of high performance demands and sleep loss stressors. If valid markers of such susceptibility can be found, it will be possible to optimize and individualize crew resources, and mitigate stress and other behavioral health and performance risks autonomously during long-duration space flight.

The SIRIUS (Scientific International Research In a Unique terrestrial Station) missions are the first time NASA’s Human Research Program (HRP) partners with Russia’s IBMP (Institute for Biomedical Problems) Ground-based Experimental Complex (NEK) to conduct a series of analog missions. Dr. Goel's project will be part of the 2019 mission as well as the upcoming 2020 mission.

Research Impact/Earth Benefits: The project's research will deliver a countermeasure (set of diverse biomarkers) for distinguishing those who are more resilient versus those who are more susceptible to the adverse neurobehavioral effects of high performance demands and sleep loss stressors. If valid markers of such susceptibility can be found, it will be possible to optimize and individualize crew resources, and mitigate stress and other behavioral health and performance risks autonomously during long-duration space flight. This information would also be of use on Earth in applied occupations that demand similar risks and stressors.

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2020 
Task Progress: New project for FY2020.

NOTE this is continuation of "Biomarkers as Predictors of Resiliency and Susceptibility to Stress in Space Flight," grant NNX14AN49G, due to Principal Investigator (PI) move to Rush University from University of Pennsylvania in summer 2019, requiring issue of new grant. See that project for previous reporting.

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 12/27/2019)  Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
 None in FY 2020