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Project Title:  Approaching Gravity As a Continuum: Musculoskeletal Effects of Fractional Reloading Expand All
Images: icon  Fiscal Year: FY 2020 
Division: Space Biology 
Research Discipline/Element:
Animal Biology: Vertebrate 
Start Date: 10/01/2019  
End Date: 09/30/2022  
Task Last Updated: 09/23/2019 
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Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Rutkove, Seward  M.D. / Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Inc./Harvard Medical School 
Address:  330 Brookline Ave TCC-810  
 
Boston , MA 02215-5400 
Email: srutkove@bidmc.harvard.edu 
Phone: 617-667-8130  
Congressional District:
Web:  
Organization Type: UNIVERSITY 
Organization Name: Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Inc./Harvard Medical School 
Comments:  
Co-Investigator(s) / Affiliation:  Bouxsein, Mary  Ph.D./ Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Inc. 
Project Information: Grant/Contract No. 80NSSC19K1598 
Responsible Center: NASA ARC 
Grant Monitor: Griko, Yuri  
Center Contact: 650-604-0519 
Yuri.V.Griko@nasa.gov 
Solicitation: 2018 Space Biology (ROSBio) NNH18ZTT001N-FG. App B: Flight and Ground Space Biology Research 
Grant/Contract No.: 80NSSC19K1598 
Project Type: GROUND  
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Space Biology Element: (1) Animal Biology: Vertebrate
Space Biology Cross-Element Discipline: (1) Musculoskeletal Biology
Space Biology Special Category: (1) Translational (Countermeasure) Potential
Task Description: The effect of full mechanical unloading has been extensively studied in both rodents and humans using ground-based models. Recently, rodent partial weight bearing (PWB) models have revealed that partial gravity provides dose-dependent rescue of the musculoskeletal system as compared to full unloading. Separate work has also shown that after unloading, an abrupt mechanical reloading to 1g causes additional musculoskeletal injury. Here, we propose to employ both PWB and hindlimb unloading models sequentially to investigate gravity as a continuum and its impact on musculoskeletal adaptation to reloading. This work will have critical practical and scientific outcomes, and will provide for the first time, insights into the musculoskeletal responses to adult to fractional gravity after a period of microgravity (as would occur when traveling to Mars). It will also provide information on the mitigating effects of partial gravity after extended unloading. Our Specific Aims are: 1) To determine the physiological adaptations of the musculoskeletal system in males to the fractional gravity of either the Moon or Mars after experiencing microgravity in transit, 2) To determine the physiological adaptations of the musculoskeletal system in females to the fractional gravity of either the Moon or Mars after experiencing microgravity in transit, and 3) To investigate the potential musculoskeletal benefits of artificial gravity in-flight before returning to Earth. Specifically, we plan to investigate the resulting musculoskeletal alterations in transitioning from 2 weeks of 0g to 0.2, 0.4, and 0.7g, hypothesizing that there is a dose-dependence to the reloading, including recovery and associated injury. We will also assess the potential benefit of using these three levels of PWB as intermediate steps on the way to transitioning back to 1g. Thorough post mortem analyses, we will be able to identify the different processes that might be involved in reloading injury and its mitigation. Stress levels and metabolic/hormonal alterations will also be evaluated. Ultimately, we hope to provide the space biology community a deeper understanding of the musculoskeletal impact of fractional gravity in relation to both microgravity and Earth gravity.

 

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Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2020 
Task Progress: New project for FY2020.

 

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 09/17/2019)  Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
 None in FY 2020