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Project Title:  Generalizable Skills and Knowledge for Exploration Missions Reduce
Fiscal Year: FY 2019 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP HFBP:Human Factors & Behavioral Performance (IRP Rev H)
Start Date: 09/10/2015  
End Date: 08/09/2019  
Task Last Updated: 08/13/2019 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Stuster, Jack W. Ph.D. / Anacapa Sciences, Inc. 
Address:  1516 Marquard Terrace 
 
Santa Barbara , CA 93101-4967 
Email: jstuster@anacapasciences.com 
Phone: 805-680-1315  
Congressional District: 24 
Web: http://www.anacapasciences.com  
Organization Type: INDUSTRY 
Organization Name: Anacapa Sciences, Inc. 
Joint Agency:  
Comments: New address per PI (12/2012); previous address--301 East Carrillo Street, Santa Barbara, CA 
Co-Investigator(s)
Affiliation: 
Adolf, Jurine  Ph.D. NASA Johnson Space Center 
Byrne, Vicky  M.S. Lockheed Martin/NASA Johnson Space Center 
Project Information: Grant/Contract No. 80NSSC18K0042 ; NNX16AQ86G ; NNX15AW34G 
Responsible Center: NASA JSC 
Grant Monitor: Williams, Thomas  
Center Contact: 281-483-8773 
thomas.j.will1@nasa.gov 
Solicitation / Funding Source: 2014-15 HERO NNJ14ZSA001N-Crew Health (FLAGSHIP & NSBRI) 
Grant/Contract No.: 80NSSC18K0042 ; NNX16AQ86G ; NNX15AW34G 
Project Type: GROUND 
Flight Program:  
TechPort: No 
No. of Post Docs:
No. of PhD Candidates:
No. of Master's Candidates:
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:
No. of PhD Degrees:
No. of Master's Degrees:
No. of Bachelor's Degrees:
Human Research Program Elements: (1) HFBP:Human Factors & Behavioral Performance (IRP Rev H)
Human Research Program Risks: (1) MPTASK:Risk of Inadequate Mission, Process and Task Design (IRP Rev H)
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) MPTASK-02:We need methods and tools to support mission, process, and task design. (Previous title: SHFE-TASK-02) (IRP Rev H)
Flight Assignment/Project Notes: NOTE: Change in grant number to 80NSSC18K0042 per NSSC information (Ed., 6/12/18)

NOTE: Change in grant number to NNX16AQ86G by NSSC and grant extended to 8/09/2019, per D. Risin/JSC (Ed., 6/21/17)

NOTE: Element change to Human Factors & Behavioral Performance; previously Space Human Factors & Habitability (Ed., 1/19/17)

Task Description: This study addresses the Risk of Inadequate Mission, Process, and Task Design and the Risk of Performance Errors Due to Training Deficiencies by identifying the tasks that will be performed during the first human expeditions to Mars and the abilities and skills that will be required of crew members. The research team developed an inventory of 1,125 tasks that are likely to be performed during the 12 phases of a conjunction-class Mars expedition, from launch to landing 30 months later. More than 60 subject matter experts (SMEs) rated major categories of expedition tasks in terms of (likely) frequency, difficulty to learn, and importance to mission success; a fourth metric was derived by combining the mean ratings of the three dimensions. SMEs also placed the physical, cognitive, and social abilities necessary to perform the tasks in order of importance for the specialist domains identified by the task analysis. The data enabled the research team to identify: 1) Eight occupational specialties needed to perform the 1,125 tasks; 2) The relative importance of 58 abilities and skills for each specialty; 3) Abilities that can be generalized across tasks and specialist domains; 4) Optimum crew size, composition, and personnel-selection issues; 5) Cross-training strategies to minimize crew size; and, 6) Implications of study results to the design of equipment, habitats, and policies for exploration-class space missions. The final report documents all study procedures and presents results of the task and ability analyses; lists of Mars expedition and Gateway tasks are included.

NOTE: Change in grant number to 80NSSC18K0042 per NSSC information (Ed., 6/12/18)

NOTE: Change in grant number to NNX16AQ86G by NSSC and grant extended to 8/09/2019, per D. Risin/JSC (Ed., 6/21/17)

Research Impact/Earth Benefits: The method that was developed for this project to identify and analyze expected tasks during a three-year expedition to Mars could serve as a model for future human factors research concerning large-scale systems. The number of tasks identified is an order of magnitude larger than that of a typical HF (human factors) analysis, and the complexity of the systems involved and the duration of the expedition render the effort unique.

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2019 
Task Progress: The report that documents research conducted under Cooperative Agreement 80NSSC18K0042 presents the results of a three-year study to identify the abilities and skills that will be required among the crews of the first human expeditions to Mars. The final report was submitted to NASA in December 2018, on the 50th anniversary of Apollo 8’s historic voyage around the Moon; the research team received notice from NASA that the report was published on 16 July 2019, the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11’s launch; and, a PDF of the report was sent to nearly 200 subject matter experts who contributed to the study on 20 July 2019 as the world celebrated the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11’s landing on the Moon.

The report begins with historical information that establishes the context of the research and is followed by a summary of Mars mission planning, from von Braun’s Das Marsprojekt to the present. The report then presents an analysis of 1,125 tasks identified by the research and the cognitive, physical, and social abilities needed by crew members to perform the tasks during a 30-month, conjunction-class expedition. The report concludes with data-driven recommendations concerning equipment, procedures, and crew size and composition. A list of 647 tasks that are likely to be performed during a Gateway mission is presented as an appendix.

The research was conducted for the Human Factors and Behavioral Performance Element, Human Research Program, located at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Johnson Space Center. The research addresses the Risk of Inadequate Mission, Process, and Task Design and the Risk of Performance Errors Due to Training Deficiencies during exploration-class space missions by identifying the tasks that will be conducted by human crew during an expedition to Mars and the abilities, skills, and knowledge that will be required of crew members. By focusing on an expedition to Mars, we have considered the extremes of what is possible for human space exploration during the first half of the 21st Century and accommodated the human requirements for missions to asteroids, Cis-Lunar orbit, and a return to the Moon.

The study uses research methods that were developed to analyze the work performed by a variety of civilian and military occupational specialties and is consistent with Human Factors methods. The work began by developing a comprehensive inventory of 1,125 tasks that are likely to be performed during the 12 phases of the first human expeditions to Mars, from launch to landing 30 months later. Sixty subject matter experts (SMEs) rated expedition tasks in terms of (likely) frequency, difficulty to learn, and importance to mission success; a fourth metric was derived by combining the mean ratings of the three dimensions. Seventy-two SMEs placed the physical, cognitive, and social abilities necessary to perform the tasks in order of importance for specialist domains identified by the task analysis. The research team then identified, 1) Abilities, skills, and knowledge that can be retained and generalized across tasks; 2) Optimum training strategies; and 3) Implications for crew size and composition. Study results also led to recommendations concerning equipment, habitats, and procedures for exploration-class space missions. The report describes why the study was conducted, describes the research tasks performed and study results, and concludes with a discussion of operational implications and recommendations based on those results. Appendices present details of the procedures used, a complete list of Mars expedition tasks (by mission phase), a list of tasks that are likely to be performed during expeditions to a Cis-Lunar Gateway, and the names of SMEs who contributed to the study.

Note: The full-mission task inventory presented in the report was developed during a comprehensive review of documentation and concepts of operations. It is understood by the study team that the tasks are based on currently-available information and that the tools, equipment, propulsion methods, and/or other aspects of actual human expeditions to Mars might be different from those described, as a consequence of technological development and evolving Mars Design Reference Missions.

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 11/13/2019) 

Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
NASA Technical Documents Stuster J, Adolf J, Byrne V, Greene M. "Generalizable Skills and Knowledge for Exploration Missions." Houston, Tex. : NASA Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2019. 188 p. NASA Contractor Report-2018-220445. http://www.spacearchitect.org/pubs/NASA-CR-2018-220445.pdf , Jul-2019
NASA Technical Documents Stuster J, Adolf J, Byrne V, Greene M. "Human Exploration of Mars: Preliminary Lists of Crew Tasks." Houston, Tex. : NASA Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2018. 54 p. NASA Contractor Report-2018-220043. https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/20190001401.pdf , Jun-2018
Project Title:  Generalizable Skills and Knowledge for Exploration Missions Reduce
Fiscal Year: FY 2018 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP HFBP:Human Factors & Behavioral Performance (IRP Rev H)
Start Date: 09/10/2015  
End Date: 08/09/2019  
Task Last Updated: 08/10/2018 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Stuster, Jack W. Ph.D. / Anacapa Sciences, Inc. 
Address:  1516 Marquard Terrace 
 
Santa Barbara , CA 93101-4967 
Email: jstuster@anacapasciences.com 
Phone: 805-680-1315  
Congressional District: 24 
Web: http://www.anacapasciences.com  
Organization Type: INDUSTRY 
Organization Name: Anacapa Sciences, Inc. 
Joint Agency:  
Comments: New address per PI (12/2012); previous address--301 East Carrillo Street, Santa Barbara, CA 
Co-Investigator(s)
Affiliation: 
Adolf, Jurine  Ph.D. NASA Johnson Space Center 
Byrne, Vicky  M.S. Lockheed Martin/NASA Johnson Space Center 
Project Information: Grant/Contract No. 80NSSC18K0042 ; NNX16AQ86G ; NNX15AW34G 
Responsible Center: NASA JSC 
Grant Monitor: Williams, Thomas  
Center Contact: 281-483-8773 
thomas.j.will1@nasa.gov 
Solicitation / Funding Source: 2014-15 HERO NNJ14ZSA001N-Crew Health (FLAGSHIP & NSBRI) 
Grant/Contract No.: 80NSSC18K0042 ; NNX16AQ86G ; NNX15AW34G 
Project Type: GROUND 
Flight Program:  
TechPort: No 
No. of Post Docs:
No. of PhD Candidates:
No. of Master's Candidates:
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:
No. of PhD Degrees:
No. of Master's Degrees:
No. of Bachelor's Degrees:
Human Research Program Elements: (1) HFBP:Human Factors & Behavioral Performance (IRP Rev H)
Human Research Program Risks: (1) MPTASK:Risk of Inadequate Mission, Process and Task Design (IRP Rev H)
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) MPTASK-02:We need methods and tools to support mission, process, and task design. (Previous title: SHFE-TASK-02) (IRP Rev H)
Flight Assignment/Project Notes: NOTE: Change in grant number to 80NSSC18K0042 per NSSC information (Ed., 6/12/18)

NOTE: Change in grant number to NNX16AQ86G by NSSC and grant extended to 8/09/2019, per D. Risin/JSC (Ed., 6/21/17)

NOTE: Element change to Human Factors & Behavioral Performance; previously Space Human Factors & Habitability (Ed., 1/19/17)

Task Description: This research is using a proven method to identify the abilities and skills necessary to perform the work expected of exploration crews and to develop recommendations for optimum training and crew selection. The process began by developing a comprehensive inventory of tasks based on a review of existing mission planning documents and interviews with astronauts and other experts. The inventory is composed of more than 1,100 tasks listed in 12 mission phases. A quantitative analysis of the tasks was performed during Year 2 in conjunction with a systematic assessment of physical, cognitive, and social abilities required to perform the expedition tasks (using Fleischman definitions augmented with job-specific abilities when needed). The task and ability analyses were conducted with the assistance of astronauts, mission planners, training experts and others and resulted in a data-driven understanding of the knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary to perform the tasks expected for exploration-class space missions. The key skills and abilities identified by the process were assessed for generalizability and then optimum strategies for ensuring that those skills and abilities are possessed by expedition crew members when needed were developed. Study results will provide the information necessary to close the target research gaps; in addition, results of the task and ability analyses will be useful to the designers of missions, procedures, software, equipment, and habitats, and to those responsible for crew composition. All work will be completed within the specified three-year period of performance by an experienced team of human factors and training specialists.

NOTE: Change in grant number to 80NSSC18K0042 per NSSC information (Ed., 6/12/18)

NOTE: Change in grant number to NNX16AQ86G by NSSC and grant extended to 8/09/2019, per D. Risin/JSC (Ed., 6/21/17)

Research Impact/Earth Benefits: The method that was developed for this project to identify and analyze expected tasks during a three-year expedition to Mars could serve as a model for future human factors research concerning large-scale systems. The number of tasks identified is an order of magnitude larger than that of a typical HF (human factors) analysis, and the complexity of the systems involved and the duration of the expedition render the effort unique.

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2018 
Task Progress: SEPTEMBER 2017 - AUGUST 2018

The project began by developing a comprehensive inventory of 1,125 tasks that are likely to be performed during the 12 phases of the first human expedition to Mars, from launch to landing 30 months later. More than 60 subject matter experts (SMEs) rated major categories of expedition tasks in terms of (likely) frequency, difficulty to learn, and importance to mission success; a fourth metric was derived by combining the mean ratings of the three dimensions. SMEs also placed the physical, cognitive, and social abilities necessary for performance of the tasks in order of importance for specialist domains identified by the task analysis. The research team then identified, 1) Abilities, skills, and knowledge that can be retained and generalized across tasks; 2) Optimum training strategies; and 3) Implications for crew size and composition. Study results also led to recommendations concerning equipment, habitats, and procedures for exploration-class space missions. A final report is currently being prepared that describes why the study was conducted, documents the research tasks performed, presents study results, and concludes with a discussion of operational implications and recommendations based on those results. The report includes the Mars expedition task lists and tasks lists for Gateway missions (formerly known as Deep Space Gateway and Lunar Orbital Platform missions).

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 11/13/2019) 

Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
 None in FY 2018
Project Title:  Generalizable Skills and Knowledge for Exploration Missions Reduce
Fiscal Year: FY 2017 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP HFBP:Human Factors & Behavioral Performance (IRP Rev H)
Start Date: 09/10/2015  
End Date: 08/09/2019  
Task Last Updated: 06/26/2018 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Stuster, Jack W. Ph.D. / Anacapa Sciences, Inc. 
Address:  1516 Marquard Terrace 
 
Santa Barbara , CA 93101-4967 
Email: jstuster@anacapasciences.com 
Phone: 805-680-1315  
Congressional District: 24 
Web: http://www.anacapasciences.com  
Organization Type: INDUSTRY 
Organization Name: Anacapa Sciences, Inc. 
Joint Agency:  
Comments: New address per PI (12/2012); previous address--301 East Carrillo Street, Santa Barbara, CA 
Co-Investigator(s)
Affiliation: 
Adolf, Jurine  Ph.D. NASA Johnson Space Center 
Byrne, Vicky  M.S. Lockheed Martin/NASA Johnson Space Center 
Project Information: Grant/Contract No. 80NSSC18K0042 ; NNX16AQ86G ; NNX15AW34G 
Responsible Center: NASA ARC 
Grant Monitor: Williams, Thomas  
Center Contact: 281-483-8773 
thomas.j.will1@nasa.gov 
Solicitation / Funding Source: 2014-15 HERO NNJ14ZSA001N-Crew Health (FLAGSHIP & NSBRI) 
Grant/Contract No.: 80NSSC18K0042 ; NNX16AQ86G ; NNX15AW34G 
Project Type: GROUND 
Flight Program:  
TechPort: No 
No. of Post Docs:
No. of PhD Candidates:
No. of Master's Candidates:
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:
No. of PhD Degrees:
No. of Master's Degrees:
No. of Bachelor's Degrees:
Human Research Program Elements: (1) HFBP:Human Factors & Behavioral Performance (IRP Rev H)
Human Research Program Risks: (1) MPTASK:Risk of Inadequate Mission, Process and Task Design (IRP Rev H)
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) MPTASK-02:We need methods and tools to support mission, process, and task design. (Previous title: SHFE-TASK-02) (IRP Rev H)
Flight Assignment/Project Notes: NOTE: Change in grant number to 80NSSC18K0042 per NSSC information (Ed., 6/12/18)

NOTE: Change in grant number to NNX16AQ86G by NSSC and grant extended to 8/09/2019, per D. Risin/JSC (Ed., 6/21/17)

NOTE: Element change to Human Factors & Behavioral Performance; previously Space Human Factors & Habitability (Ed., 1/19/17)

Task Description: This research is using a proven method to identify the abilities and skills necessary to perform the work expected of exploration crews and to develop recommendations for optimum training and crew selection. The process began by developing a comprehensive inventory of tasks based on a review of existing mission planning documents and interviews with astronauts and other experts. The inventory is composed of more than 1,100 tasks listed in 12 mission phases. A quantitative analysis of the tasks was performed during Year 2 in conjunction with a systematic assessment of physical, cognitive, and social abilities required to perform the expedition tasks (using Fleischman definitions augmented with job-specific abilities when needed). The task and ability analyses were conducted with the assistance of astronauts, mission planners, training experts and others and resulted in a data-driven understanding of the knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary to perform the tasks expected for exploration-class space missions. The key skills and abilities identified by the process were assessed for generalizability and then optimum strategies for ensuring that those skills and abilities are possessed by expedition crew members when needed were developed. Study results will provide the information necessary to close the target research gaps; in addition, results of the task and ability analyses will be useful to the designers of missions, procedures, software, equipment, and habitats, and to those responsible for crew composition. All work will be completed within the specified three-year period of performance by an experienced team of human factors and training specialists.

NOTE: Change in grant number to 80NSSC18K0042 per NSSC information (Ed., 6/12/18)

NOTE: Change in grant number to NNX16AQ86G by NSSC and grant extended to 8/09/2019, per D. Risin/JSC (Ed., 6/21/17)

Research Impact/Earth Benefits: The method that was developed for this project to identify and analyze expected tasks during a three-year expedition to Mars could serve as a model for future human factors research concerning large-scale systems. The number of tasks identified is an order of magnitude larger than that of a typical HF (human factors) analysis, and the complexity of the systems involved and the duration of the expedition render the effort unique.

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2017 
Task Progress: SEPTEMBER 2016 - AUGUST 2017

A comprehensive inventory of Mars Expedition tasks was developed during the previous reporting period. Since then, the inventory was presented in major categories of tasks within each mission phase in an Excel-based data collection form consisting of 16 tabs (tabs are included for Instructions, Assumptions, References, Acronyms, and 12 Mission Phases). Subject matter experts (SMEs) were recruited to rate the task categories in terms of Difficulty, Importance to Mission Success, and Likely Frequency during the first human expedition to Mars. We received more than 60 completed forms and are satisfied that the sample of respondents will be sufficient for data analysis.

The research team also has conducted more than 70 ability card-sort exercises with SMEs. Additional appointments with SMEs have been made and others are pending.

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 11/13/2019) 

Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
 None in FY 2017
Project Title:  Generalizable Skills and Knowledge for Exploration Missions Reduce
Fiscal Year: FY 2016 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP HFBP:Human Factors & Behavioral Performance (IRP Rev H)
Start Date: 09/10/2015  
End Date: 08/09/2019  
Task Last Updated: 09/13/2016 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Stuster, Jack W. Ph.D. / Anacapa Sciences, Inc. 
Address:  1516 Marquard Terrace 
 
Santa Barbara , CA 93101-4967 
Email: jstuster@anacapasciences.com 
Phone: 805-680-1315  
Congressional District: 24 
Web: http://www.anacapasciences.com  
Organization Type: INDUSTRY 
Organization Name: Anacapa Sciences, Inc. 
Joint Agency:  
Comments: New address per PI (12/2012); previous address--301 East Carrillo Street, Santa Barbara, CA 
Co-Investigator(s)
Affiliation: 
Adolf, Jurine  Ph.D. NASA Johnson Space Center 
Byrne, Vicky  M.S. Lockheed Martin/NASA Johnson Space Center 
Project Information: Grant/Contract No. NNX16AQ86G ; NNX15AW34G 
Responsible Center: NASA JSC 
Grant Monitor: Williams, Thomas  
Center Contact: 281-483-8773 
thomas.j.will1@nasa.gov 
Solicitation / Funding Source: 2014-15 HERO NNJ14ZSA001N-Crew Health (FLAGSHIP & NSBRI) 
Grant/Contract No.: NNX16AQ86G ; NNX15AW34G 
Project Type: GROUND 
Flight Program:  
TechPort: No 
No. of Post Docs:
No. of PhD Candidates:
No. of Master's Candidates:
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:
No. of PhD Degrees:
No. of Master's Degrees:
No. of Bachelor's Degrees:
Human Research Program Elements: (1) HFBP:Human Factors & Behavioral Performance (IRP Rev H)
Human Research Program Risks: (1) MPTASK:Risk of Inadequate Mission, Process and Task Design (IRP Rev H)
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) MPTASK-02:We need methods and tools to support mission, process, and task design. (Previous title: SHFE-TASK-02) (IRP Rev H)
Flight Assignment/Project Notes: NOTE: Change in grant number to NNX16AQ86G by NSSC and grant extended to 8/09/2019, per D. Risin/JSC (Ed., 6/21/17)

NOTE: Element change to Human Factors & Behavioral Performance; previously Space Human Factors & Habitability (Ed., 1/19/17)

Task Description: This research is using a proven method to identify the abilities and skills necessary to perform the work expected of exploration crews and to develop recommendations for optimum training. The process began by developing a comprehensive inventory of tasks based on a review of existing mission planning documents and interviews with astronauts and other experts. The inventory is composed of nearly 1,200 tasks listed in 12 mission phases. A quantitative analysis of the tasks will be performed during Year 2 in conjunction with a systematic assessment of physical, cognitive, and social abilities required to perform the expedition tasks (using Fleischman definitions augmented with job-specific abilities when needed). The task and ability analyses will be conducted with the assistance of astronauts, mission planners, and training experts and will result in a data-driven understanding of the knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary to perform the tasks expected for expedition-class space missions. The key skills and abilities identified by the process will be assessed for perishability, trainability, and generalizability and then optimum strategies for ensuring that those skills and abilities are possessed by expedition crew members when needed will be developed based on principles derived from the research team's detailed understanding of the relevant training literature. Study results will provide the information necessary to close the target research gaps; in addition, results of the task and ability analyses will be useful to the designers of missions, procedures, software, equipment, and habitats, and to those responsible for crew composition. All work will be completed within the specified three-year period of performance by an experienced team of human factors and training specialists.

NOTE: Change in grant number to NNX16AQ86G by NSSC and grant extended to 8/09/2019, per D. Risin/JSC (Ed., 6/21/17)

Research Impact/Earth Benefits: The method that is being developed for this project to identify and analyze expected tasks during a three-year expedition to Mars will serve as a model for future human factors research concerning large-scale systems. The number of tasks identified during Year 1 is an order of magnitude larger than that of a typical HF (human factors) analysis, and the complexity of the systems involved and the duration of the expedition render the effort unique and, we hope, exemplary.

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2016 
Task Progress: Accomplishments During the Reporting Period:

Participated in a pre-kickoff teleconference.

Met with NASA HF experts.

Participated in kickoff teleconference.

Began weekly teleconferences with Johnson Space Center (JSC) teammates.

Identified/obtained/reviewed Mars mission planning documents (ongoing).

Extracted Mars mission tasks from planning documents; developed lists by 12 mission segments.

Conducted interviews re Mars tasks at University of North Dakota Space Studies Department.

Received additional medical tasks from JSC team; added launch and landing segments.

Received habitability and computer troubleshooting tasks from JSC team.

Sent task inventory to Dr. Stephen Hoffman for review; received/incorporated his comments.

Requested IRB (Institutional Review Board) approval for task analysis.

Met with JSC team and Dr. Hoffman at HF office, JSC, to discuss task inventory.

Sent task inventory to Astronaut, Dr. Don Pettit, for review.

Received comments from Dr. Pettit: Task lists are comprehensive, but too detailed to rate.

Formatted Excel document to permit evaluation of rating format for survey instrument.

Conducted experiments to estimate time required to rate tasks (difficulty, frequency, importance).

Increased categorization of tasks within each mission segment to reduce rating burden/time.

Sent task inventory to Dr. John Charles for review; response: "...looks like The Martian Behind the Scenes."

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 11/13/2019) 

Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
 None in FY 2016
Project Title:  Generalizable Skills and Knowledge for Exploration Missions Reduce
Fiscal Year: FY 2015 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP HFBP:Human Factors & Behavioral Performance (IRP Rev H)
Start Date: 09/10/2015  
End Date: 09/09/2018  
Task Last Updated: 09/25/2015 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Stuster, Jack W. Ph.D. / Anacapa Sciences, Inc. 
Address:  1516 Marquard Terrace 
 
Santa Barbara , CA 93101-4967 
Email: jstuster@anacapasciences.com 
Phone: 805-680-1315  
Congressional District: 24 
Web: http://www.anacapasciences.com  
Organization Type: INDUSTRY 
Organization Name: Anacapa Sciences, Inc. 
Joint Agency:  
Comments: New address per PI (12/2012); previous address--301 East Carrillo Street, Santa Barbara, CA 
Co-Investigator(s)
Affiliation: 
Adolf, Jurine  Ph.D. NASA Johnson Space Center 
Byrne, Vicky  M.S. Lockheed Martin/NASA Johnson Space Center 
Project Information: Grant/Contract No. NNX15AW34G 
Responsible Center: NASA JSC 
Grant Monitor: Whitmore, Mihriban  
Center Contact: 281-244-1004 
mihriban.whitmore-1@nasa.gov 
Solicitation / Funding Source: 2014-15 HERO NNJ14ZSA001N-Crew Health (FLAGSHIP & NSBRI) 
Grant/Contract No.: NNX15AW34G 
Project Type: GROUND 
Flight Program:  
TechPort: No 
No. of Post Docs:  
No. of PhD Candidates:  
No. of Master's Candidates:  
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:  
No. of PhD Degrees:  
No. of Master's Degrees:  
No. of Bachelor's Degrees:  
Human Research Program Elements: (1) HFBP:Human Factors & Behavioral Performance (IRP Rev H)
Human Research Program Risks: (1) MPTASK:Risk of Inadequate Mission, Process and Task Design (IRP Rev H)
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) MPTASK-02:We need methods and tools to support mission, process, and task design. (Previous title: SHFE-TASK-02) (IRP Rev H)
Task Description: This proposal offers to apply a proven method to identify the abilities and skills necessary to perform the work expected of exploration crews, and to develop recommendations for optimum training. The process will begin by developing a comprehensive inventory of tasks based on a review of existing mission planning documents and interviews with astronauts and other experts. A quantitative analysis of the tasks will be performed in conjunction with a systematic assessment of physical, cognitive, and social abilities required to perform the expedition tasks (using Fleischman definitions augmented with job-specific abilities when needed). The task and ability analyses will be conducted with the assistance of a large sample of astronauts, mission planners, and training experts and will result in a data-driven understanding of the knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary to perform the tasks expected for expedition-class space missions. The key skills and abilities identified by the process will be assessed for perishability, trainability, and generalizability and then optimum strategies for ensuring that those skills and abilities are possessed by expedition crew members when needed and will be developed based on principles derived from the research team's detailed understanding of the relevant training literature. Study results will provide the information necessary to close the target research gaps; in addition, results of the task and ability analyses will be useful to the designers of missions, procedures, software, equipment, and habitats, and to those responsible for crew composition. All work will be completed within the specified three-year period of performance by an experienced team of human factors and training specialists.

Research Impact/Earth Benefits:

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2015 
Task Progress: New project for FY2015.

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 11/13/2019) 

Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
 None in FY 2015