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Project Title:  Quantification of In-flight Physical Changes - Anthropometry and Neutral Body Posture (NBP) Reduce
Fiscal Year: FY 2018 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP HFBP:Human Factors & Behavioral Performance (IRP Rev H)
Start Date: 08/31/2012  
End Date: 09/30/2018  
Task Last Updated: 05/13/2019 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Rajulu, Sudhakar  Ph.D. / NASA Johnson Space Center 
Address:  Code SF3 
2101 NASA Pkwy 
Houston , TX 77058 
Email: sudhakar.rajulu-1@nasa.gov 
Phone: 281-483-3725  
Congressional District: 22 
Web:  
Organization Type: NASA CENTER 
Organization Name: NASA Johnson Space Center 
Joint Agency:  
Comments:  
Co-Investigator(s)
Affiliation: 
Young, Karen  B.S. Leidos/Wyle/NASA Johnson Space Center 
Dirlich, Tom  Technical University Munich (TUM), Germany 
Kim, Han  Ph.D. Leidos/Wyle/NASA Johnson Space Center 
Key Personnel Changes / Previous PI: 2016: Removed Ryan Amick as Co-Investigator (Co-I) and added Han Kim, Ph.D., as Co-I. July 2015: Added Ryan Amick as Co-Investigator.
Project Information: Grant/Contract No. Directed Research 
Responsible Center: NASA JSC 
Grant Monitor: Williams, Thomas  
Center Contact: 281-483-8773 
thomas.j.will1@nasa.gov 
Solicitation / Funding Source: Directed Research 
Grant/Contract No.: Directed Research 
Project Type: FLIGHT 
Flight Program: ISS 
TechPort: No 
No. of Post Docs:  
No. of PhD Candidates:  
No. of Master's Candidates:  
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:  
No. of PhD Degrees:  
No. of Master's Degrees:  
No. of Bachelor's Degrees:  
Human Research Program Elements: (1) HFBP:Human Factors & Behavioral Performance (IRP Rev H)
Human Research Program Risks: (1) Hab:Risk of an Incompatible Vehicle/Habitat Design
(2) Occupant Protection:Risk of Injury from Dynamic Loads (Risk move from HHC to SHFH per IRP Rev F)
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) HAB-02:We need to understand what aspects of human physical capabilities and limitations (e.g., body size and shape, range of gross movement) change for predetermined mission attributes, and need to be accommodated in internal vehicle/habitat design. (Previous title: SHFE-HAB-05) (IRP Rev H)
(2) OP04:We do not have a set of analytical tools to inform design decisions for new programs and reduce required human testing for validation of initial or modified designs (IRP Rev F)
Flight Assignment/Project Notes: ISS

NOTE: Element change to Human Factors & Behavioral Performance; previously Space Human Factors & Habitability (Ed., 1/18/17)

NOTE: Extended to 9/30/2018 per E. Connell/HRP (Ed., 7/20/15)

Task Description: NASA suit engineers and the Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA) Projects Office have identified that suit fit in microgravity could become an increasing issue. It has also been noted that crewmembers often need to adjust their suit sizing once they are in orbit. This adjustment could be due to microgravity effects on anthropometry and postural changes, and is necessary to ensure optimal crew performance, fit, and comfort in space. To date, the only data collected in space to determine the effects of microgravity on physical human changes have been during Skylab, STS-57, and a recent Human Research Program (HRP) study on seated height changes due to spinal elongation, Spinal Elongation (Master Task List [MTL] 221, Principal Investigator Rajulu-- https://taskbook.nasaprs.com/Publication/index.cfm?action=public_query_taskbook_content&TASKID=8523 ), (Young, 2011). Skylab and the STS-57 studies found that there is a distinct neutral body posture (NBP) based on photographs. Additionally, Skylab studies found that crewmembers could experience a stature growth of up to 3 percent. The Spinal Elongation study identified that the crewmembers could experience about a 6 percent growth in seated height and a 3 percent stature growth, when exposed to microgravity. The results thus prove that not all anthropometric measurements have the same microgravity percent growth factor. In order for EVA and the suit engineers to properly update the sizing protocol for microgravity, they need additional anthropometric data from space. Hence, this study was funded by EVA to gather additional in-flight anthropometric measurements, such as lengths, depths, breadths, and circumferences to determine the changes to body shape and size due to microgravity effects.

It is anticipated that by recording the potential changes to body shape and size, a better suit sizing protocol will be developed for International Space Station (ISS) and other space missions. In essence, this study will help NASA quantify the impacts of microgravity on anthropometry to ensure optimal crew performance, fit, and comfort. Additional in-flight physical changes due to neutral body postures (NBP) and the effects of spaceflight on NBP during extended exposure to microgravity also need to be quantified. This study will use simplistic data collection techniques, digital still and video data, to perform photogrammetric analyses to determine the changes that occur to the body shape, size, and NBP while exposed to a microgravity environment.

The aim of the study is to collect data from a minimum of three subjects per year over a four year time frame leading to a possible 9 subjects total. Data would be collected over multiple six month increments starting with increment 39/40 in November 2013. A minimum of three data collection sessions is required with an initial in-flight data collection session at approximately FD15.

Anthropometric measurements will be collected from crew participants during one pre-flight BDC (baseline data collection), three in-flight data collection points (early, mid, and late at minimum), and one post-flight BDC session. In-flight data collection will include photo and video based measurements for body lengths and postures, as well as tape measure measurements for body segment circumferences. Ground based BDC data collection sessions will be performed in the US Lab mockup and in the Anthropometry and Biomechanics Facility at Johnson Space Center (JSC).

Rationale for HRP Directed Research: This research is directed because it contains highly constrained research, which requires focused and constrained data gathering and analysis that is more appropriately obtained through a non-competitive proposal.

Research Impact/Earth Benefits:

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2018 
Task Progress: During FY18, the study completed data collection and analysis of 9 subjects. The results have shown similar trends to the historical data--stature resulted in an increase in growth within the first 15 days of spaceflight and then a plateau for the duration of the Mission. Other measurements exhibited common trends within and between subjects while some measurements were highly variable due to marker and posture variability.

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 03/25/2020) 

Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
 None in FY 2018
Project Title:  Quantification of In-flight Physical Changes - Anthropometry and Neutral Body Posture (NBP) Reduce
Fiscal Year: FY 2017 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP HFBP:Human Factors & Behavioral Performance (IRP Rev H)
Start Date: 08/31/2012  
End Date: 09/30/2018  
Task Last Updated: 06/08/2017 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Rajulu, Sudhakar  Ph.D. / NASA Johnson Space Center 
Address:  Code SF3 
2101 NASA Pkwy 
Houston , TX 77058 
Email: sudhakar.rajulu-1@nasa.gov 
Phone: 281-483-3725  
Congressional District: 22 
Web:  
Organization Type: NASA CENTER 
Organization Name: NASA Johnson Space Center 
Joint Agency:  
Comments:  
Co-Investigator(s)
Affiliation: 
Young, Karen  Leidos 
Dirlich, Tom  Technical University Munich (TUM) 
Kim, Han  Ph.D. Leidos 
Key Personnel Changes / Previous PI: 2016: Removed Ryan Amick as Co-Investigator (Co-I) and added Han Kim, Ph.D., as Co-I. July 2015: Added Ryan Amick as Co-Investigator.
Project Information: Grant/Contract No. Directed Research 
Responsible Center: NASA JSC 
Grant Monitor: Williams, Thomas  
Center Contact: 281-483-8773 
thomas.j.will1@nasa.gov 
Solicitation / Funding Source: Directed Research 
Grant/Contract No.: Directed Research 
Project Type: FLIGHT 
Flight Program: ISS 
TechPort: No 
No. of Post Docs:  
No. of PhD Candidates:  
No. of Master's Candidates:  
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:  
No. of PhD Degrees:  
No. of Master's Degrees:  
No. of Bachelor's Degrees:  
Human Research Program Elements: (1) HFBP:Human Factors & Behavioral Performance (IRP Rev H)
Human Research Program Risks: (1) Hab:Risk of an Incompatible Vehicle/Habitat Design
(2) Occupant Protection:Risk of Injury from Dynamic Loads (Risk move from HHC to SHFH per IRP Rev F)
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) HAB-02:We need to understand what aspects of human physical capabilities and limitations (e.g., body size and shape, range of gross movement) change for predetermined mission attributes, and need to be accommodated in internal vehicle/habitat design. (Previous title: SHFE-HAB-05) (IRP Rev H)
(2) OP04:We do not have a set of analytical tools to inform design decisions for new programs and reduce required human testing for validation of initial or modified designs (IRP Rev F)
Flight Assignment/Project Notes: ISS

NOTE: Element change to Human Factors & Behavioral Performance; previously Space Human Factors & Habitability (Ed., 1/18/17)

NOTE: Extended to 9/30/2018 per E. Connell/HRP (Ed., 7/20/15)

Task Description: NASA suit engineers and the Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA) Projects Office have identified that suit fit in microgravity could become an increasing issue. It has also been noted that crewmembers often need to adjust their suit sizing once they are in orbit. This adjustment could be due to microgravity effects on anthropometry and postural changes, and is necessary to ensure optimal crew performance, fit, and comfort in space. To date, the only data collected in space to determine the effects of microgravity on physical human changes have been during Skylab, STS-57, and a recent Human Research Program (HRP) study on seated height changes due to spinal elongation, Spinal Elongation (Master Task List [MTL] 221, Principal Investigator Rajulu-- https://taskbook.nasaprs.com/Publication/index.cfm?action=public_query_taskbook_content&TASKID=8523 ), (Young, 2011). Skylab and the STS-57 studies found that there is a distinct neutral body posture (NBP) based on photographs. Additionally, Skylab studies found that crewmembers could experience a stature growth of up to 3 percent. The Spinal Elongation study identified that the crewmembers could experience about a 6 percent growth in seated height and a 3 percent stature growth, when exposed to microgravity. The results thus prove that not all anthropometric measurements have the same microgravity percent growth factor. In order for EVA and the suit engineers to properly update the sizing protocol for microgravity, they need additional anthropometric data from space. Hence, this study was picked up by the International Space Station (ISS) as Test bed for Analog Research (ISTAR) Program and was sponsored and funded by EVA to gather additional in-flight anthropometric measurements, such as lengths, depths, breadths, and circumferences to determine the changes to body shape and size due to microgravity effects.

It is anticipated that by recording the potential changes to body shape and size, a better suit sizing protocol will be developed for ISS and other space missions. In essence, this study will help NASA quantify the impacts of microgravity on anthropometry to ensure optimal crew performance, fit, and comfort. Additional in-flight physical changes due to neutral body postures (NBP) and the effects of spaceflight on NBP during extended exposure to microgravity also need to be quantified. This study will use simplistic data collection techniques, digital still and video data, to perform photogrammetric analyses to determine the changes that occur to the body shape, size, and NBP while exposed to a microgravity environment.

The aim of the study is to collect data from a minimum of three subjects per year over a four year time frame leading to a possible 9 subjects total. Data would be collected over multiple six month increments starting with increment 39/40 in November 2013. A minimum of three data collection sessions is required with an initial in-flight data collection session at approximately FD15.

Anthropometric measurements will be collected from crew participants during one pre-flight BDC (baseline data collection), three in-flight data collection points (early, mid, and late at minimum), and one post-flight BDC session. In-flight data collection will include photo and video based measurements for body lengths and postures, as well as tape measure measurements for body segment circumferences. Ground based BDC data collection sessions will be performed in the US Lab mockup and in the Anthropometry and Biomechanics Facility at Johnson Space Center (JSC).

Rationale for HRP Directed Research: This research is directed because it contains highly constrained research, which requires focused and constrained data gathering and analysis that is more appropriately obtained through a non-competitive proposal.

Research Impact/Earth Benefits:

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2017 
Task Progress: Inflight data collection began October 2013 with Expedition 37/38 and has continued during Expeditions 38/39, 39/40, 40/41, 42/43, 44/45, 48/49, 50/51. The study will complete data collection this Fiscal Year (FY) with an N=9. During FY17 several inflight data collections sessions have occurred for the last two subjects, along with training, pre-flight data collection sessions to instruct the crew on the procedures and to obtain their baseline measurements before flight, and post-flight data collection. Analysis has been on-going as throughout study; full results will be discussed at end of study to provide a population analysis. However, individual subjects have been debriefed regarding their individual data and the population data at the current time.

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 03/25/2020) 

Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
Papers from Meeting Proceedings Kim KH, Young KS, Bernal Y, Boppana A, Vu LQ, Benson EA, Jarvis S, Rajulu SL. "A Parametric Model of Shoulder Articulation for Virtual Assessment of Space Suit Fit." 7th International Conference on 3D Body Scanning Technologies, Lugano, Switzerland, 30 Nov. - 1 Dec. 2016.

7th International Conference on 3D Body Scanning Technologies, Lugano, Switzerland, 30 Nov. - 1 Dec. 2016. 7 p. https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/20160012730.pdf , Nov-2016

Project Title:  Quantification of In-flight Physical Changes - Anthropometry and Neutral Body Posture (NBP) Reduce
Fiscal Year: FY 2016 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP HFBP:Human Factors & Behavioral Performance (IRP Rev H)
Start Date: 08/31/2012  
End Date: 09/30/2018  
Task Last Updated: 06/21/2016 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Rajulu, Sudhakar  Ph.D. / NASA Johnson Space Center 
Address:  Code SF3 
2101 NASA Pkwy 
Houston , TX 77058 
Email: sudhakar.rajulu-1@nasa.gov 
Phone: 281-483-3725  
Congressional District: 22 
Web:  
Organization Type: NASA CENTER 
Organization Name: NASA Johnson Space Center 
Joint Agency:  
Comments:  
Co-Investigator(s)
Affiliation: 
Young, Karen  Lockheed Martin 
Dirlich, Tom  Technical University Munich (TUM) 
Amick, Ryan  Ph.D. Lockheed Martin 
Key Personnel Changes / Previous PI: July 2015: Added Ryan Amick as Co-Investigator.
Project Information: Grant/Contract No. Directed Research 
Responsible Center: NASA JSC 
Grant Monitor: Williams, Thomas  
Center Contact: 281-483-8773 
thomas.j.will1@nasa.gov 
Solicitation / Funding Source: Directed Research 
Grant/Contract No.: Directed Research 
Project Type: FLIGHT 
Flight Program: ISS 
TechPort: No 
No. of Post Docs:  
No. of PhD Candidates:  
No. of Master's Candidates:  
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:  
No. of PhD Degrees:  
No. of Master's Degrees:  
No. of Bachelor's Degrees:  
Human Research Program Elements: (1) HFBP:Human Factors & Behavioral Performance (IRP Rev H)
Human Research Program Risks: (1) Hab:Risk of an Incompatible Vehicle/Habitat Design
(2) Occupant Protection:Risk of Injury from Dynamic Loads (Risk move from HHC to SHFH per IRP Rev F)
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) HAB-02:We need to understand what aspects of human physical capabilities and limitations (e.g., body size and shape, range of gross movement) change for predetermined mission attributes, and need to be accommodated in internal vehicle/habitat design. (Previous title: SHFE-HAB-05) (IRP Rev H)
(2) OP04:We do not have a set of analytical tools to inform design decisions for new programs and reduce required human testing for validation of initial or modified designs (IRP Rev F)
Flight Assignment/Project Notes: ISS

NOTE: Element change to Human Factors & Behavioral Performance; previously Space Human Factors & Habitability (Ed., 1/18/17)

NOTE: Extended to 9/30/2018 per E. Connell/HRP (Ed., 7/20/15)

Task Description: NASA suit engineers and the Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA) Projects Office have identified that suit fit in microgravity could become an increasing issue. It has also been noted that crewmembers often need to adjust their suit sizing once they are in orbit. This adjustment could be due to microgravity effects on anthropometry and postural changes, and is necessary to ensure optimal crew performance, fit, and comfort in space. To date, the only data collected in space to determine the effects of microgravity on physical human changes have been during Skylab, STS-57, and a recent Human Research Program (HRP) study on seated height changes due to spinal elongation, Spinal Elongation (Master Task List [MTL] 221, Principal Investigator Rajulu-- https://taskbook.nasaprs.com/Publication/index.cfm?action=public_query_taskbook_content&TASKID=8523 ), (Young, 2011). Skylab and the STS-57 studies found that there is a distinct neutral body posture (NBP) based on photographs. Additionally, Skylab studies found that crewmembers could experience a stature growth of up to 3 percent. The Spinal Elongation study identified that the crewmembers could experience about a 6 percent growth in seated height and a 3 percent stature growth, when exposed to microgravity. The results thus prove that not all anthropometric measurements have the same microgravity percent growth factor. In order for EVA and the suit engineers to properly update the sizing protocol for microgravity, they need additional anthropometric data from space. Hence, this study was picked up by the International Space Station (ISS) as Test bed for Analog Research (ISTAR) Program and was sponsored and funded by EVA to gather additional in-flight anthropometric measurements, such as lengths, depths, breadths, and circumferences to determine the changes to body shape and size due to microgravity effects.

It is anticipated that by recording the potential changes to body shape and size, a better suit sizing protocol will be developed for ISS and other space missions. In essence, this study will help NASA quantify the impacts of microgravity on anthropometry to ensure optimal crew performance, fit, and comfort. Additional in-flight physical changes due to neutral body postures (NBP) and the effects of spaceflight on NBP during extended exposure to microgravity also need to be quantified. This study will use simplistic data collection techniques, digital still and video data, to perform photogrammetric analyses to determine the changes that occur to the body shape, size, and NBP while exposed to a microgravity environment.

The aim of the study is to collect data from a minimum of three subjects per year over a four year time frame leading to a possible 9 subjects total. Data would be collected over multiple six month increments starting with increment 39/40 in November 2013. A minimum of three data collection sessions is required with an initial in-flight data collection session at approximately FD15.

Anthropometric measurements will be collected from crew participants during one pre-flight BDC (baseline data collection), three in-flight data collection points (early, mid, and late at minimum), and one post-flight BDC session. In-flight data collection will include photo and video based measurements for body lengths and postures, as well as tape measure measurements for body segment circumferences. Ground based BDC data collection sessions will be performed in the US Lab mockup and in the Anthropometry and Biomechanics Facility at Johnson Space Center (JSC).

Rationale for HRP Directed Research: This research is directed because it contains highly constrained research, which requires focused and constrained data gathering and analysis that is more appropriately obtained through a non-competitive proposal.

Research Impact/Earth Benefits:

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2016 
Task Progress: Inflight data collection began October 2013 with Expedition 37/38 and has continued during Expeditions 38/39, 39/40, 40/41, 42/43, 44/45. The study will continue till an N=9 has completed the study; to-date seven subjects have completed the study, and two are currently performing pre-flight training and data collection sessions. During FY2016 several inflight data collections sessions have occurred along with training and pre-flight data collection sessions to instruct the crew on the procedures and to obtain their baseline measurements before flight (both as Prime crew and Backup crew).

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 03/25/2020) 

Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
 None in FY 2016
Project Title:  Quantification of In-flight Physical Changes - Anthropometry and Neutral Body Posture (NBP) Reduce
Fiscal Year: FY 2015 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP HFBP:Human Factors & Behavioral Performance (IRP Rev H)
Start Date: 08/31/2012  
End Date: 09/30/2018  
Task Last Updated: 07/06/2015 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Rajulu, Sudhakar  Ph.D. / NASA Johnson Space Center 
Address:  Code SF3 
2101 NASA Pkwy 
Houston , TX 77058 
Email: sudhakar.rajulu-1@nasa.gov 
Phone: 281-483-3725  
Congressional District: 22 
Web:  
Organization Type: NASA CENTER 
Organization Name: NASA Johnson Space Center 
Joint Agency:  
Comments:  
Co-Investigator(s)
Affiliation: 
Young, Karen  Lockheed Martin 
Reid, Christopher  Lockheed Martin 
Dirlich, Tom  Technical University Munich (TUM) 
Amick, Ryan  Ph.D. Lockheed Martin 
Key Personnel Changes / Previous PI: July 2015: Added Ryan Amick as Co-Investigator.
Project Information: Grant/Contract No. Directed Research 
Responsible Center: NASA JSC 
Grant Monitor: Whitmore, Mihriban  
Center Contact: 281-244-1004 
mihriban.whitmore-1@nasa.gov 
Solicitation / Funding Source: Directed Research 
Grant/Contract No.: Directed Research 
Project Type: FLIGHT 
Flight Program: ISS 
TechPort: No 
No. of Post Docs:  
No. of PhD Candidates:  
No. of Master's Candidates:  
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:  
No. of PhD Degrees:  
No. of Master's Degrees:  
No. of Bachelor's Degrees:  
Human Research Program Elements: (1) HFBP:Human Factors & Behavioral Performance (IRP Rev H)
Human Research Program Risks: (1) Hab:Risk of an Incompatible Vehicle/Habitat Design
(2) Occupant Protection:Risk of Injury from Dynamic Loads (Risk move from HHC to SHFH per IRP Rev F)
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) HAB-02:We need to understand what aspects of human physical capabilities and limitations (e.g., body size and shape, range of gross movement) change for predetermined mission attributes, and need to be accommodated in internal vehicle/habitat design. (Previous title: SHFE-HAB-05) (IRP Rev H)
(2) OP04:We do not have a set of analytical tools to inform design decisions for new programs and reduce required human testing for validation of initial or modified designs (IRP Rev F)
Flight Assignment/Project Notes: ISS

NOTE: Extended to 9/30/2018 per E. Connell/HRP (Ed., 7/20/15)

Task Description: NASA suit engineers and the Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA) Projects Office have identified that suit fit in microgravity could become an increasing issue. It has also been noted that crewmembers often need to adjust their suit sizing once they are in orbit. This adjustment could be due to microgravity effects on anthropometry and postural changes, and is necessary to ensure optimal crew performance, fit, and comfort in space. To date, the only data collected in space to determine the effects of microgravity on physical human changes have been during Skylab, STS-57, and a recent Human Research Program (HRP) study on seated height changes due to spinal elongation, Spinal Elongation (Master Task List [MTL] 221, Principal Investigator Rajulu-- https://taskbook.nasaprs.com/Publication/index.cfm?action=public_query_taskbook_content&TASKID=8523 ), (Young, 2011). Skylab and the STS-57 studies found that there is a distinct neutral body posture (NBP) based on photographs. Additionally, Skylab studies found that crewmembers could experience a stature growth of up to 3 percent. The Spinal Elongation study identified that the crewmembers could experience about a 6 percent growth in seated height and a 3 percent stature growth, when exposed to microgravity. The results thus prove that not all anthropometric measurements have the same microgravity percent growth factor. In order for EVA and the suit engineers to properly update the sizing protocol for microgravity, they need additional anthropometric data from space. Hence, this study was picked up by the International Space Station (ISS) as Test bed for Analog Research (ISTAR) Program and was sponsored and funded by EVA to gather additional in-flight anthropometric measurements, such as lengths, depths, breadths, and circumferences to determine the changes to body shape and size due to microgravity effects.

It is anticipated that by recording the potential changes to body shape and size, a better suit sizing protocol will be developed for ISS and other space missions. In essence, this study will help NASA quantify the impacts of microgravity on anthropometry to ensure optimal crew performance, fit, and comfort. Additional in-flight physical changes due to neutral body postures (NBP) and the effects of spaceflight on NBP during extended exposure to microgravity also need to be quantified. This study will use simplistic data collection techniques, digital still and video data, to perform photogrammetric analyses to determine the changes that occur to the body shape, size, and NBP while exposed to a microgravity environment.

The aim of the study is to collect data from a minimum of three subjects per year over a four year time frame leading to a possible 12 subjects total. Data would be collected over multiple six month increments starting with increment 39/40 in November 2013. A minimum of three data collection sessions is required with an initial in-flight data collection session at approximately FD15.

Anthropometric measurements will be collected from crew participants during one pre-flight BDC (baseline data collection), three in-flight data collection points (early, mid, and late at minimum), and one post-flight BDC session. In-flight data collection will include photo and video based measurements for body lengths and postures, as well as tape measure measurements for body segment circumferences. Ground based BDC data collection sessions will be performed in the US Lab mockup and in the Anthropometry and Biomechanics Facility at Johnson Space Center (JSC).

Rationale for HRP Directed Research: This research is directed because it contains highly constrained research, which requires focused and constrained data gathering and analysis that is more appropriately obtained through a non-competitive proposal.

Research Impact/Earth Benefits:

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2015 
Task Progress: Inflight data collection began October 2013 with Expedition 37/38 and has continued during Expeditions 38/39, 39/40, 40/41, 42/43, 44/45. The study will continue till an N=9 has completed the study; to-date six subjects have completed the study, and three are currently performing pre-flight training and data collection sessions. During FY2015 several inflight data collections sessions have occurred, along with training and pre-flight data collection sessions to instruct the crew on the procedures and to obtain their baseline measurements before flight (both as Prime crew and Backup crew).

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 03/25/2020) 

Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
 None in FY 2015
Project Title:  Quantification of In-flight Physical Changes - Anthropometry and Neutral Body Posture (NBP) Reduce
Fiscal Year: FY 2014 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP HFBP:Human Factors & Behavioral Performance (IRP Rev H)
Start Date: 08/31/2012  
End Date: 09/01/2017  
Task Last Updated: 06/18/2014 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Rajulu, Sudhakar  Ph.D. / NASA Johnson Space Center 
Address:  Code SF3 
2101 NASA Pkwy 
Houston , TX 77058 
Email: sudhakar.rajulu-1@nasa.gov 
Phone: 281-483-3725  
Congressional District: 22 
Web:  
Organization Type: NASA CENTER 
Organization Name: NASA Johnson Space Center 
Joint Agency:  
Comments:  
Co-Investigator(s)
Affiliation: 
Young, Karen  Lockheed Martin 
Reid, Christopher  Lockheed Martin 
Dirlich, Tom  Technical University Munich (TUM) 
Project Information: Grant/Contract No. Directed Research 
Responsible Center: NASA JSC 
Grant Monitor: Whitmore, Mihriban  
Center Contact: 281-244-1004 
mihriban.whitmore-1@nasa.gov 
Solicitation / Funding Source: Directed Research 
Grant/Contract No.: Directed Research 
Project Type: FLIGHT 
Flight Program: ISS 
TechPort: No 
No. of Post Docs:  
No. of PhD Candidates:  
No. of Master's Candidates:  
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:  
No. of PhD Degrees:  
No. of Master's Degrees:  
No. of Bachelor's Degrees:  
Human Research Program Elements: (1) HFBP:Human Factors & Behavioral Performance (IRP Rev H)
Human Research Program Risks: (1) Hab:Risk of an Incompatible Vehicle/Habitat Design
(2) Occupant Protection:Risk of Injury from Dynamic Loads (Risk move from HHC to SHFH per IRP Rev F)
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) HAB-02:We need to understand what aspects of human physical capabilities and limitations (e.g., body size and shape, range of gross movement) change for predetermined mission attributes, and need to be accommodated in internal vehicle/habitat design. (Previous title: SHFE-HAB-05) (IRP Rev H)
(2) OP04:We do not have a set of analytical tools to inform design decisions for new programs and reduce required human testing for validation of initial or modified designs (IRP Rev F)
Flight Assignment/Project Notes: ISS

Task Description: NASA suit engineers and the Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA) Projects Office have identified that suit fit in microgravity could become an increasing issue. It has also been noted that crewmembers often need to adjust their suit sizing once they are in orbit. This adjustment could be due to microgravity effects on anthropometry and postural changes, and is necessary to ensure optimal crew performance, fit, and comfort in space. To date, the only data collected in space to determine the effects of microgravity on physical human changes have been during Skylab, STS-57, and a recent HRP study on seated height changes due to spinal elongation, Spinal Elongation (Master Task List [MTL] 221), (Young, 2011). Skylab and the STS-57 studies found that the there is a distinct neutral body posture (NBP) based on photographs. Additionally, Skylab studies found that crewmembers could experience a stature growth of up to 3 percent. The Spinal Elongation study identified that the crewmembers could experience about a 6 percent growth in seated height and a 3 percent stature growth, when exposed to microgravity. The results thus prove that not all anthropometric measurements have the same microgravity percent growth factor. In order for EVA and the suit engineers to properly update the sizing protocol for microgravity, they need additional anthropometric data from space. Hence, this study was picked up by the ISS as Test bed for Analog Research (ISTAR) Program and was sponsored and funded by EVA to gather additional in-flight anthropometric measurements, such as lengths, depths, breadths, and circumferences to determine the changes to body shape and size due to microgravity effects.

It is anticipated that by recording the potential changes to body shape and size, a better suit sizing protocol will be developed for ISS and other space missions. In essence, this study will help NASA quantify the impacts of microgravity on anthropometry to ensure optimal crew performance, fit, and comfort. Additional in-flight physical changes due to neutral body postures (NBP) and the effects of spaceflight on NBP during extended exposure to microgravity also need to be quantified. This study will use simplistic data collection techniques, digital still and video data, to perform photogrammetric analyses to determine the changes that occur to the body shape, size, and NBP while exposed to a microgravity environment.

The aim of the study is to collect data from a minimum of three subjects per year over a four year time frame leading to a possible 12 subjects total. Data would be collected over multiple six month increments starting with increment 39/40 in November 2013. A minimum of three data collection sessions is required with an initial in-flight data collection session at approximately FD15.

Anthropometric measurements will be collected from crew participants during one pre-flight BDC, three in-flight data collection points (early, mid, and late at minimum), and one post-flight BDC data collection sessions. In-flight data collection will include photo and video based measurements for body lengths and postures, as well as tape measure measurements for body segment circumferences. Ground based BDC data collection sessions will be performed in the US Lab mockup and in the Anthropometry and Biomechanics Facility at JSC.

Rationale for HRP Directed Research: This research is directed because it contains highly constrained research, which requires focused and constrained data gathering and analysis that is more appropriately obtained through a non-competitive proposal.

Research Impact/Earth Benefits: 0

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2014 
Task Progress: Inflight data collection began October 2013 with Expedition 37/38 and has continued during Expeditions 38/39, 39/40, 40/41. The study will continue until an N=12 has completed the study; to date 8 subjects have consented to the study, two subjects have completed the study, and three subjects are currently performing inflight data collection sessions. During FY14 several training and pre-flight data collections have been performed to instruct the crew on the procedures and to obtain their baseline measurements before flight (both as Prime crew and Backup crew).

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 03/25/2020) 

Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
 None in FY 2014
Project Title:  Quantification of In-flight Physical Changes - Anthropometry and Neutral Body Posture (NBP) Reduce
Fiscal Year: FY 2013 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP HFBP:Human Factors & Behavioral Performance (IRP Rev H)
Start Date: 08/31/2012  
End Date: 09/01/2017  
Task Last Updated: 06/20/2013 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Rajulu, Sudhakar  Ph.D. / NASA Johnson Space Center 
Address:  Code SF3 
2101 NASA Pkwy 
Houston , TX 77058 
Email: sudhakar.rajulu-1@nasa.gov 
Phone: 281-483-3725  
Congressional District: 22 
Web:  
Organization Type: NASA CENTER 
Organization Name: NASA Johnson Space Center 
Joint Agency:  
Comments:  
Co-Investigator(s)
Affiliation: 
Young, Karen  Lockheed Martin 
Reid, Christopher  Lockheed Martin 
Dirlich, Tom  Technical University Munich (TUM) 
Project Information: Grant/Contract No. Directed Research 
Responsible Center: NASA JSC 
Grant Monitor: Whitmore, Mihriban  
Center Contact: 281-244-1004 
mihriban.whitmore-1@nasa.gov 
Solicitation / Funding Source: Directed Research 
Grant/Contract No.: Directed Research 
Project Type: FLIGHT 
Flight Program: ISS 
TechPort: No 
No. of Post Docs:  
No. of PhD Candidates:  
No. of Master's Candidates:  
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:  
No. of PhD Degrees:  
No. of Master's Degrees:  
No. of Bachelor's Degrees:  
Human Research Program Elements: (1) HFBP:Human Factors & Behavioral Performance (IRP Rev H)
Human Research Program Risks: (1) Hab:Risk of an Incompatible Vehicle/Habitat Design
(2) Occupant Protection:Risk of Injury from Dynamic Loads (Risk move from HHC to SHFH per IRP Rev F)
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) HAB-02:We need to understand what aspects of human physical capabilities and limitations (e.g., body size and shape, range of gross movement) change for predetermined mission attributes, and need to be accommodated in internal vehicle/habitat design. (Previous title: SHFE-HAB-05) (IRP Rev H)
(2) OP04:We do not have a set of analytical tools to inform design decisions for new programs and reduce required human testing for validation of initial or modified designs (IRP Rev F)
Flight Assignment/Project Notes: ISS Flight Preparation

Task Description: NASA suit engineers and the Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA) Projects Office have identified that suit fit in microgravity could become an increasing issue. It has also been noted that crewmembers often need to adjust their suit sizing once they are in orbit. This adjustment could be due to microgravity effects on anthropometry and postural changes, and is necessary to ensure optimal crew performance, fit, and comfort in space. To date, the only data collected in space to determine the effects of microgravity on physical human changes have been during Skylab, STS-57, and a recent HRP study on seated height changes due to spinal elongation, Spinal Elongation (Master Task List [MTL] 221), (Young, 2011). Skylab and the STS-57 studies found that the there is a distinct neutral body posture (NBP) based on photographs. Additionally, Skylab studies found that crewmembers could experience a stature growth of up to 3 percent. The Spinal Elongation study identified that the crewmembers could experience about a 6 percent growth in seated height and a 3 percent stature growth, when exposed to microgravity. The results thus prove that not all anthropometric measurements have the same microgravity percent growth factor. In order for EVA and the suit engineers to properly update the sizing protocol for microgravity, they need additional anthropometric data from space. Hence, this study was picked up by the ISS as Test bed for Analog Research (ISTAR) Program and was sponsored and funded by EVA to gather additional in-flight anthropometric measurements, such as lengths, depths, breadths, and circumferences to determine the changes to body shape and size due to microgravity effects.

It is anticipated that by recording the potential changes to body shape and size, a better suit sizing protocol will be developed for ISS and other space missions. In essence, this study will help NASA quantify the impacts of microgravity on anthropometry to ensure optimal crew performance, fit, and comfort. Additional in-flight physical changes due to neutral body postures (NBP) and the effects of spaceflight on NBP during extended exposure to microgravity also need to be quantified. This study will use simplistic data collection techniques, digital still and video data, to perform photogrammetric analyses to determine the changes that occur to the body shape, size, and NBP while exposed to a microgravity environment.

The aim of the study is to collect data from a minimum of three subjects per year over a four year time frame leading to a possible 12 subjects total. Data would be collected over multiple six month increments starting with increment 39/40 in November 2013. A minimum of three data collection sessions is required with an initial in-flight data collection session at approximately FD15.

Anthropometric measurements will be collected from crew participants during one pre-flight BDC, three in-flight data collection points (early, mid, and late at minimum), and one post-flight BDC data collection sessions. In-flight data collection will include photo and video based measurements for body lengths and postures, as well as tape measure measurements for body segment circumferences. Ground based BDC data collection sessions will be performed in the US Lab mockup at JSC.

Rationale for HRP Directed Research: This research is directed because it contains highly constrained research, which requires focused and constrained data gathering and analysis that is more appropriately obtained through a non-competitive proposal.

Research Impact/Earth Benefits: 0

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2013 
Task Progress: This year was the first year of the study during which progress was made towards implementing the study on ISS and finalizing the methodology and procedures for use by crewmembers in orbit. The study has started recruiting crewmembers for participation starting with Increment 39/40, has began collecting baseline data (pre-flight), and has performed crew procedural training for those that have consented to participating in the study.

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 03/25/2020) 

Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
 None in FY 2013
Project Title:  Quantification of In-flight Physical Changes - Anthropometry and Neutral Body Posture (NBP) Reduce
Fiscal Year: FY 2012 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP HFBP:Human Factors & Behavioral Performance (IRP Rev H)
Start Date: 08/31/2012  
End Date: 09/01/2017  
Task Last Updated: 09/28/2012 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Rajulu, Sudhakar  Ph.D. / NASA Johnson Space Center 
Address:  Code SF3 
2101 NASA Pkwy 
Houston , TX 77058 
Email: sudhakar.rajulu-1@nasa.gov 
Phone: 281-483-3725  
Congressional District: 22 
Web:  
Organization Type: NASA CENTER 
Organization Name: NASA Johnson Space Center 
Joint Agency:  
Comments:  
Co-Investigator(s)
Affiliation: 
Young, Karen  Lockheed Martin 
Reid, Christopher  Lockheed Martin 
Dirlich, Tom  Technical University Munich (TUM) 
Project Information: Grant/Contract No. Directed Research 
Responsible Center: NASA JSC 
Grant Monitor: Sullivan, Thomas  
Center Contact:  
thomas.a.sullivan@nasa.gov 
Solicitation / Funding Source: Directed Research 
Grant/Contract No.: Directed Research 
Project Type: FLIGHT 
Flight Program: ISS 
TechPort: No 
No. of Post Docs:  
No. of PhD Candidates:  
No. of Master's Candidates:  
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:  
No. of PhD Degrees:  
No. of Master's Degrees:  
No. of Bachelor's Degrees:  
Human Research Program Elements: (1) HFBP:Human Factors & Behavioral Performance (IRP Rev H)
Human Research Program Risks: (1) Hab:Risk of an Incompatible Vehicle/Habitat Design
(2) Occupant Protection:Risk of Injury from Dynamic Loads (Risk move from HHC to SHFH per IRP Rev F)
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) HAB-02:We need to understand what aspects of human physical capabilities and limitations (e.g., body size and shape, range of gross movement) change for predetermined mission attributes, and need to be accommodated in internal vehicle/habitat design. (Previous title: SHFE-HAB-05) (IRP Rev H)
(2) OP04:We do not have a set of analytical tools to inform design decisions for new programs and reduce required human testing for validation of initial or modified designs (IRP Rev F)
Flight Assignment/Project Notes: ISS Flight Preparation

Task Description: NASA suit engineers and the Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA) Projects Office have identified that suit fit in microgravity could become an increasing issue. It has also been noted that crewmembers often need to adjust their suit sizing once they are in orbit. This adjustment could be due to microgravity effects on anthropometry and postural changes, and is necessary to ensure optimal crew performance, fit, and comfort in space. To date, the only data collected in space to determine the effects of microgravity on physical human changes have been during Skylab, STS-57, and a recent Human Research Program (HRP) study on seated height changes due to spinal elongation, Spinal Elongation (Master Task List [MTL] 221, Principal Investigator Rajulu-- https://taskbook.nasaprs.com/Publication/index.cfm?action=public_query_taskbook_content&TASKID=8523 ), (Young, 2011). Skylab and the STS-57 studies found that there is a distinct neutral body posture (NBP) based on photographs. Additionally, Skylab studies found that crewmembers could experience a stature growth of up to 3 percent. The Spinal Elongation study identified that the crewmembers could experience about a 6 percent growth in seated height and a 3 percent stature growth, when exposed to microgravity. The results thus prove that not all anthropometric measurements have the same microgravity percent growth factor. In order for EVA and the suit engineers to properly update the sizing protocol for microgravity, they need additional anthropometric data from space. Hence, this study was picked up by the International Space Station (ISS) as Test bed for Analog Research (ISTAR) Program and was sponsored and funded by EVA to gather additional in-flight anthropometric measurements, such as lengths, depths, breadths, and circumferences to determine the changes to body shape and size due to microgravity effects.

It is anticipated that by recording the potential changes to body shape and size, a better suit sizing protocol will be developed for ISS and other space missions. In essence, this study will help NASA quantify the impacts of microgravity on anthropometry to ensure optimal crew performance, fit, and comfort. Additional in-flight physical changes due to neutral body postures (NBP) and the effects of spaceflight on NBP during extended exposure to microgravity also need to be quantified. This study will use simplistic data collection techniques, digital still and video data, to perform photogrammetric analyses to determine the changes that occur to the body shape, size, and NBP while exposed to a microgravity environment.

The aim of the study is to collect data from a minimum of three subjects per year over a four year time frame leading to a possible 12 subjects total. Data would be collected over multiple six month increments starting with increment 39/40 in November 2013. A minimum of three data collection sessions is required with an initial in-flight data collection session at approximately FD15.

Anthropometric measurements will be collected from crew participants during one pre-flight BDC (baseline data collection), three in-flight data collection points (early, mid, and late at minimum), and one post-flight BDC session. In-flight data collection will include photo and video based measurements for body lengths and postures, as well as tape measure measurements for body segment circumferences. Ground based BDC data collection sessions will be performed in the US Lab mockup and in the Anthropometry and Biomechanics Facility at Johnson Space Center (JSC).

Rationale for HRP Directed Research: This research is directed because it contains highly constrained research, which requires focused and constrained data gathering and analysis that is more appropriately obtained through a non-competitive proposal.

Research Impact/Earth Benefits: 0

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2012 
Task Progress: New project for FY2012.

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 03/25/2020) 

Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
 None in FY 2012