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Project Title:  Defining the Relation Between Biomarkers of Oxidative and Inflammatory Stress and Atherosclerosis Risk in Astronauts During and After Long-Duration Spaceflight Reduce
Fiscal Year: FY 2016 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Start Date: 10/01/2011  
End Date: 02/29/2016  
Task Last Updated: 05/10/2016 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Platts, Steven H. Ph.D. / NASA Johnson Space Center 
Address:  Cardiovascular Laboratory 
Biomedical Research and Environmental Sciences Division 
Houston , TX 77058 
Email: steven.platts-1@nasa.gov 
Phone: 281-483-8177  
Congressional District: 36 
Web:  
Organization Type: NASA CENTER 
Organization Name: NASA Johnson Space Center 
Joint Agency:  
Comments:  
Co-Investigator(s)
Affiliation: 
Lee, Stuart  M.S. Wyle Science, Technology, and Engineering Group 
Ploutz-Snyder, Robert  Ph.D. Universities Space Research Association 
Smith, Scott  Ph.D. NASA Johnson Space Center 
Stenger, Michael  Ph.D. Wyle Science, Technology, and Engineering Group 
Westby, Christian  Ph.D. Universities Space Research Association 
Key Personnel Changes / Previous PI: none
Project Information: Grant/Contract No. Internal Project 
Responsible Center: NASA JSC 
Grant Monitor: Villarreal, Jennifer  
Center Contact: 281-483-7306 
jennifer.v311larreal@nasa.gov 
Solicitation / Funding Source: 2010 Crew Health NNJ10ZSA003N 
Grant/Contract No.: Internal Project 
Project Type: FLIGHT 
Flight Program: ISS 
TechPort: No 
No. of Post Docs:
No. of PhD Candidates:
No. of Master's Candidates:
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:
No. of PhD Degrees:
No. of Master's Degrees:
No. of Bachelor's Degrees:
Human Research Program Elements: (1) HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Human Research Program Risks: (1) Arrhythmia:Risk of Cardiac Rhythm Problems
(2) Degen:Risk Of Cardiovascular Disease and Other Degenerative Tissue Effects From Radiation Exposure (IRP Rev F)
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) CV08:Can manifestations of sub-clinical or environmentally induced cardiovascular diseases during spaceflight be predicted?
(2) Degen07:Are there significant synergistic effects from other spaceflight factors (microgravity, stress, altered circadian rhythms, changes in immune responses, etc.) that modify the degenerative risk from space radiation?
Flight Assignment/Project Notes: ISS

NOTE: End date changed to 2/29/2016 due to PI change to Stuart M.C. Lee (Ed., 5/10/16)

NOTE: End date is 5/10/2022 per R. Brady/HHC element/JSC (Ed., 10/8/15)

Task Description: Atherosclerosis is the major contributor to cardiovascular disease-related morbidity and mortality. Research indicates that many of the risk factors commonly associated with atherosclerosis contribute to endothelial dysfunction, a process which presents early in life before angiographic evidence of disease and precedes the clinical manifestation of many cardiovascular disease-related disorders. In an effort to compensate for the initial risk factor-related disruptions to homeostasis, there is a compensatory upregulation of atheroprotective mechanisms. However, in the absence of appropriate risk factor management, these defense mechanisms may become overwhelmed and less able to reestablish normal function. Key systems that help maintain vascular homeostasis and are susceptible to differential deleterious alterations include those that help balance levels of oxidative and inflammatory stress. New evidence suggests that long-duration spaceflight may promote oxidative and inflammatory stress through mechanisms such as radiation exposure, diet, physical inactivity, and psychological stress. However, there are no data supporting a causal link between biomarkers of oxidative and inflammatory stress and indices of vascular endothelial dysfunction in spaceflight. As such, we propose to examine the relation between biomarkers of oxidative and inflammatory stress and well-established measures of vascular endothelial dysfunction (flow mediated dilation (FMD)) and carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) in astronauts before, during, and after long duration spaceflight.

Research Impact/Earth Benefits: It is well known that inflammation is a key contributor to the development of atherosclerosis. There is also emerging work showing the link with oxidative damage. This work may contribute to general clinical science by showing the interactions of multiple stressors in a unique environment (spaceflight).

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2016 
Task Progress: METHODS

To meet the objectives of the study, 12 astronauts will be studied before, during, and up to 5 years after long duration missions aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Biomarkers of oxidative and inflammatory stress, some of which we have previously shown to be elevated with spaceflight, will be measured from blood and urine samples taken before, during and after spaceflight. Arterial structure and function will be assessed before, during, and after spaceflight using standard clinical ultrasound measures that are well-established clinical indices of atherosclerosis risk. Pre- and post-flight ultrasound measures will be obtained in the laboratory by trained sonographers, and astronauts will obtain ultrasound images on-orbit with real-time guidance from experts on the ground using remote guidance. This is the first study to assess immediate and long-term risk for atherosclerosis using biochemical, structural and functional measures before, during, immediately after, and up to five years after spaceflight.

Additionally, data from one subject on NASA’s first one-year mission will be shared with a complementary project in the suite of Twins Studies, entitled Metabolomic and genomic markers of atherosclerosis as related to oxidative stress, inflammation, and vascular function in twin astronauts. NNJ13ZSA002N-TWINS: Differential Effects on Homozygous Twin Astronauts Associated with Differences in Exposure to Spaceflight Factors.

RESULTS

Ten astronauts have participated in pre-flight testing, seven have completed in- and immediate post-flight testing (R+5), and four have participated in testing at R+365. No crewmember has participated in testing at R+3 years. Ultrasound data analysis is in progress. Analysis of blood and urine samples predicated on delivery of in-flight samples has been delayed due to re-entry vehicle availability.

DISCUSSION

Samples from pre-flight data collections have been archived so that they may be batch processed with in- and post-flight samples. Inflight data collection is in progress; timing of the analysis of inflight samples will be dependent upon return of the samples from the ISS. Data sharing of relevant measurements collected as medical requirements or part of a complementary studies will be leveraged to inform the study results.

NOTE: Stuart M. C. Lee has taken over the project as of March 2016. Project continues with the same title with Dr. Lee as the Principal Investigator.

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 03/01/2018)  Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
Abstracts for Journals and Proceedings Lee SMC, Stenger MB, Smith SM, Zwart SR, Laurie SS, Ploutz-Snyder RJ, Platts SH. "Defining the relationship between biomarkers of oxidative and inflammatory stress and the risk for atherosclerosis in astronauts during and after long duration space flight." 2016 NASA Human Research Program Investigators’ Workshop, Galveston, TX, February 8-11, 2016.

2016 NASA Human Research Program Investigators’ Workshop, Galveston, TX, February 8-11, 2016. , Feb-2016

Abstracts for Journals and Proceedings Lee SMC, Westby CM, Stenger MB, Smith SM, Zwart SR, Rana B, Ploutz-Snyder RJ, Platts SH. "Defining the relationship between biomarkers of oxidative and inflammatory stress and the risk for atherosclerosis in astronauts during and after long duration space flight." 2015 NASA Human Research Program Investigators’ Workshop, Galveston, TX, January 13-15, 2015.

2015 NASA Human Research Program Investigators’ Workshop, Galveston, TX, January 13-15, 2015. , Jan-2015

Significant Media Coverage Lee SMC with Lori Meggs (NASA Public Affairs). "Space Station Live: The Heart of the Matter. Video interview with CoInvestigator Stuart M.C. Lee." Video interview, July 8, 2015. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GQsD4qmwhzk , Jul-2015
Project Title:  Defining the relation between biomarkers of oxidative and inflammatory stress and atherosclerosis risk in astronauts during and after long-duration spaceflight Reduce
Fiscal Year: FY 2015 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Start Date: 10/01/2011  
End Date: 02/29/2016  
Task Last Updated: 11/12/2014 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Platts, Steven H. Ph.D. / NASA Johnson Space Center 
Address:  Cardiovascular Laboratory 
Biomedical Research and Environmental Sciences Division 
Houston , TX 77058 
Email: steven.platts-1@nasa.gov 
Phone: 281-483-8177  
Congressional District: 36 
Web:  
Organization Type: NASA CENTER 
Organization Name: NASA Johnson Space Center 
Joint Agency:  
Comments:  
Co-Investigator(s)
Affiliation: 
Lee, Stuart  M.S. Wyle Science, Technology, and Engineering Group 
Ploutz-Snyder, Robert  Ph.D. Universities Space Research Association 
Smith, Scott  Ph.D. NASA Johnson Space Center 
Stenger, Michael  Ph.D. Wyle Science, Technology, and Engineering Group 
Westby, Christian  Ph.D. Universities Space Research Association 
Key Personnel Changes / Previous PI: none
Project Information: Grant/Contract No. Internal Project 
Responsible Center: NASA JSC 
Grant Monitor: Villarreal, Jennifer  
Center Contact: 281-483-7306 
jennifer.v311larreal@nasa.gov 
Solicitation / Funding Source: 2010 Crew Health NNJ10ZSA003N 
Grant/Contract No.: Internal Project 
Project Type: FLIGHT 
Flight Program: ISS 
TechPort: No 
No. of Post Docs:
No. of PhD Candidates:
No. of Master's Candidates:
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:
No. of PhD Degrees:
No. of Master's Degrees:
No. of Bachelor's Degrees:
Human Research Program Elements: (1) HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Human Research Program Risks: (1) Arrhythmia:Risk of Cardiac Rhythm Problems
(2) Degen:Risk Of Cardiovascular Disease and Other Degenerative Tissue Effects From Radiation Exposure (IRP Rev F)
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) CV08:Can manifestations of sub-clinical or environmentally induced cardiovascular diseases during spaceflight be predicted?
(2) Degen07:Are there significant synergistic effects from other spaceflight factors (microgravity, stress, altered circadian rhythms, changes in immune responses, etc.) that modify the degenerative risk from space radiation?
Flight Assignment/Project Notes: ISS

NOTE: End date changed to 2/29/2016 due to PI change to Stuart M.C. Lee (Ed., 5/10/16)

NOTE: End date is 5/10/2022 per R. Brady/HHC element/JSC (Ed., 10/8/15)

Task Description: Atherosclerosis is the major contributor to cardiovascular disease-related morbidity and mortality. Research indicates that many of the risk factors commonly associated with atherosclerosis contribute to endothelial dysfunction, a process which presents early in life before angiographic evidence of disease and precedes the clinical manifestation of many cardiovascular disease-related disorders. In an effort to compensate for the initial risk factor-related disruptions to homeostasis, there is a compensatory upregulation of atheroprotective mechanisms. However, in the absence of appropriate risk factor management, these defense mechanisms may become overwhelmed and less able to reestablish normal function. Key systems that help maintain vascular homeostasis, and are susceptible to differential deleterious alterations, include those that help balance levels of oxidative and inflammatory stress. New evidence suggests that long duration spaceflight may promote oxidative and inflammatory stress through mechanisms such as radiation exposure, diet, physical inactivity, and psychological stress. However, there are no data supporting a causal link between biomarkers of oxidative and inflammatory stress and indices of vascular endothelial dysfunction in spaceflight. As such, we propose to examine the relation between biomarkers of oxidative and inflammatory stress and well established measures of vascular endothelial dysfunction (flow mediated dilation (FMD) and carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT)), in astronauts before, during, and after long duration spaceflight.

Research Impact/Earth Benefits: It is well known that inflammation is a key contributor to the development of atherosclerosis. There is also emerging work showing the link with oxidative damage. This work may contribute to general clinical science by showing the interactions of multiple stressors in a unique environment (spaceflight).

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2015 
Task Progress: One astronaut volunteer has completed in pre-, in-, and immediate post-flight testing; two have participated in pre- and in-flight testing with landing scheduled after the anniversary date of this project; one has completed pre-flight testing and will launch to ISS after the anniversary date of this project, and one will start pre-flight testing in the next month. No astronaut has yet to participate in testing beyond the immediate post-flight period. Data analysis of the available data sets are in progress.

Additionally, data from one subject on NASA’s first one-year mission will be shared with a complementary project in the suite of Twins Studies, entitled Metabolomic and genomic markers of atherosclerosis as related to oxidative stress, inflammation, and vascular function in twin astronauts. NNJ13ZSA002N-TWINS: Differential Effects on Homozygous Twin Astronauts Associated with Differences in Exposure to Spaceflight Factors.

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 03/01/2018)  Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
Abstracts for Journals and Proceedings Lee SMC, Westby CM, Stenger MB, Smith SM, Zwart S, Ploutz-Snyder RJ, Platts SH. "Defining the relationship between biomarkers of oxidative and inflammatory stress and the risk of atherosclerosis in astronauts during and after long-duration spaceflight." Presented at 2014 NASA Human Research Program Investigators’ Workshop, Galveston, TX, February 12-13, 2014.

2014 NASA Human Research Program Investigators’ Workshop, Galveston, TX, February 12-13, 2014. http://www.hou.usra.edu/meetings/hrp2014/pdf/3162.pdf , Feb-2014

Project Title:  Defining the relation between biomarkers of oxidative and inflammatory stress and atherosclerosis risk in astronauts during and after long-duration spaceflight Reduce
Fiscal Year: FY 2014 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Start Date: 10/01/2011  
End Date: 09/30/2015  
Task Last Updated: 07/26/2013 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Platts, Steven H. Ph.D. / NASA Johnson Space Center 
Address:  Cardiovascular Laboratory 
Biomedical Research and Environmental Sciences Division 
Houston , TX 77058 
Email: steven.platts-1@nasa.gov 
Phone: 281-483-8177  
Congressional District: 36 
Web:  
Organization Type: NASA CENTER 
Organization Name: NASA Johnson Space Center 
Joint Agency:  
Comments:  
Co-Investigator(s)
Affiliation: 
Lee, Stuart  M.S. Wyle Science, Technology, and Engineering Group 
Ploutz-Snyder, Robert  Ph.D. Universities Space Research Association 
Smith, Scott  Ph.D. NASA Johnson Space Center 
Stenger, Michael  Ph.D. Wyle Science, Technology, and Engineering Group 
Westby, Christian  Ph.D. Universities Space Research Association 
Key Personnel Changes / Previous PI: none
Project Information: Grant/Contract No. Internal Project 
Responsible Center: NASA JSC 
Grant Monitor: Villarreal, Jennifer  
Center Contact: 281-483-7306 
jennifer.v311larreal@nasa.gov 
Solicitation / Funding Source: 2010 Crew Health NNJ10ZSA003N 
Grant/Contract No.: Internal Project 
Project Type: FLIGHT 
Flight Program: ISS 
TechPort: No 
No. of Post Docs:
No. of PhD Candidates:
No. of Master's Candidates:
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:
No. of PhD Degrees:
No. of Master's Degrees:
No. of Bachelor's Degrees:
Human Research Program Elements: (1) HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Human Research Program Risks: (1) Arrhythmia:Risk of Cardiac Rhythm Problems
(2) Degen:Risk Of Cardiovascular Disease and Other Degenerative Tissue Effects From Radiation Exposure (IRP Rev F)
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) CV08:Can manifestations of sub-clinical or environmentally induced cardiovascular diseases during spaceflight be predicted?
(2) Degen07:Are there significant synergistic effects from other spaceflight factors (microgravity, stress, altered circadian rhythms, changes in immune responses, etc.) that modify the degenerative risk from space radiation?
Flight Assignment/Project Notes: ISS

Task Description: Atherosclerosis is the major contributor to cardiovascular disease-related morbidity and mortality. Research indicates that many of the risk factors commonly associated with atherosclerosis contribute to endothelial dysfunction, a process which presents early in life before angiographic evidence of disease and precedes the clinical manifestation of many cardiovascular disease-related disorders. In an effort to compensate for the initial risk factor-related disruptions to homeostasis, there is a compensatory upregulation of atheroprotective mechanisms. However, in the absence of appropriate risk factor management, these defense mechanisms may become overwhelmed and less able to reestablish normal function. Key systems that help maintain vascular homeostasis, and are susceptible to differential deleterious alterations, include those that help balance levels of oxidative and inflammatory stress. New evidence suggests that long duration spaceflight may promote oxidative and inflammatory stress through mechanisms such as radiation exposure, diet, physical inactivity, and psychological stress. However, there are no data supporting a causal link between biomarkers of oxidative and inflammatory stress and indices of vascular endothelial dysfunction in space flight. As such, we propose to examine the relation between biomarkers of oxidative and inflammatory stress and well established measures of vascular endothelial dysfunction (flow mediated dilation (FMD) and carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT)), in astronauts before, during, and after long duration spaceflight.

Research Impact/Earth Benefits: It is well known that inflammation is a key contributor to the development of atherosclerosis. There is also emerging work showing the link with oxidative damage. This work may contribute to general clinical science by showing the interactions of multiple stressors in a unique environment (spaceflight).

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2014 
Task Progress: The experiment, “Defining the Relationship between Biomarkers of Oxidative and Inflammatory Stress and the Risk for Atherosclerosis in Astronauts during and after Long-Duration Space Flight,” was selected for flight on March 2, 2012. The first astronaut volunteer began training on September 9, 2012, and the first baseline data collection (BDC) session for this study was performed on October 5, 2012. To-date, three astronauts have volunteered to participate in this study when assigned as the prime crewmember, three volunteered to participate when serving as the back-up crewmember, and three astronauts have been designated to serve as test operators when serving as the prime crewmember.

Pre-flight baseline data collection and training sessions will have been completed for one prime crewmember by the anniversary date of this project, but this astronaut will not have launched to ISS, and no in-flight sessions will have occurred. Thus, there are no data report at this time. Two prime crewmembers and one back-up also will have begun training, and the first pre-flight baseline data collection will have been completed for the back-up crewmember by the anniversary date.

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 03/01/2018)  Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
Abstracts for Journals and Proceedings Lee SMC, Westby CM, Stenger MB, Smith SM, Zwart S, Ploutz-Snyder RJ, Platts SH. "Defining the relationship between biomarkers of oxidative and inflammatory stress and the risk for atherosclerosis in astronauts during and after long-duration space flight." 2013 NASA Human Research Program Investigators’ Workshop, Galveston, TX, February 12-14, 2013.

2013 NASA Human Research Program Investigators’ Workshop, Galveston, TX, February 12-14, 2013. , Feb-2013

Project Title:  Defining the relation between biomarkers of oxidative and inflammatory stress and atherosclerosis risk in astronauts during and after long-duration spaceflight Reduce
Fiscal Year: FY 2013 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Start Date: 10/01/2011  
End Date: 09/30/2015  
Task Last Updated: 09/20/2012 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Platts, Steven H. Ph.D. / NASA Johnson Space Center 
Address:  Cardiovascular Laboratory 
Biomedical Research and Environmental Sciences Division 
Houston , TX 77058 
Email: steven.platts-1@nasa.gov 
Phone: 281-483-8177  
Congressional District: 36 
Web:  
Organization Type: NASA CENTER 
Organization Name: NASA Johnson Space Center 
Joint Agency:  
Comments:  
Co-Investigator(s)
Affiliation: 
Lee, Stuart  M.S. Wyle Laboratories, Inc. 
Ploutz-Snyder, Robert  Ph.D. Universities Space Research Association 
Smith, Scott  Ph.D. NASA Johnson Space Center 
Stenger, Michael  Ph.D. Wyle Laboratories, Inc. 
Westby, Christian  Ph.D. Universities Space Research Association 
Key Personnel Changes / Previous PI: none
Project Information: Grant/Contract No. Internal Project 
Responsible Center: NASA JSC 
Grant Monitor: Villarreal, Jennifer  
Center Contact: 281-483-7306 
jennifer.v311larreal@nasa.gov 
Solicitation / Funding Source: 2010 Crew Health NNJ10ZSA003N 
Grant/Contract No.: Internal Project 
Project Type: FLIGHT 
Flight Program: ISS 
TechPort: No 
No. of Post Docs:
No. of PhD Candidates:
No. of Master's Candidates:
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:
No. of PhD Degrees:
No. of Master's Degrees:
No. of Bachelor's Degrees:
Human Research Program Elements: (1) HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Human Research Program Risks: (1) Arrhythmia:Risk of Cardiac Rhythm Problems
(2) Degen:Risk Of Cardiovascular Disease and Other Degenerative Tissue Effects From Radiation Exposure (IRP Rev F)
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) CV08:Can manifestations of sub-clinical or environmentally induced cardiovascular diseases during spaceflight be predicted?
(2) Degen07:Are there significant synergistic effects from other spaceflight factors (microgravity, stress, altered circadian rhythms, changes in immune responses, etc.) that modify the degenerative risk from space radiation?
Flight Assignment/Project Notes: ISS

Task Description: Atherosclerosis is the major contributor to cardiovascular disease-related morbidity and mortality. Research indicates that many of the risk factors commonly associated with atherosclerosis contribute to endothelial dysfunction, a process which presents early in life before angiographic evidence of disease and precedes the clinical manifestation of many cardiovascular disease-related disorders. In an effort to compensate for the initial risk factor-related disruptions to homeostasis, there is a compensatory upregulation of atheroprotective mechanisms. However, in the absence of appropriate risk factor management, these defense mechanisms may become overwhelmed and less able to reestablish normal function. Key systems that help maintain vascular homeostasis, and are susceptible to differential deleterious alterations, include those that help balance levels of oxidative and inflammatory stress. New evidence suggests that long duration spaceflight may promote oxidative and inflammatory stress through mechanisms such as radiation exposure, diet, physical inactivity, and psychological stress. However, there are no data supporting a causal link between biomarkers of oxidative and inflammatory stress and indices of vascular endothelial dysfunction in space flight. As such, we propose to examine the relation between biomarkers of oxidative and inflammatory stress and well established measures of vascular endothelial dysfunction (flow mediated dilation (FMD) and carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT)), in astronauts before, during, and after long duration spaceflight.

Research Impact/Earth Benefits: It is well known that inflammation is a key contributor to the development of atherosclerosis. There is also emerging work showing the link with oxidative damage. This work may contribute to general clinical science by showing the interactions of multiple stressors in a unique environment (spaceflight).

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2013 
Task Progress: This task has recently completed the flight definition phase. Flight feasibility has been conducted, and approvals have been granted by multiple boards (including select for flight). Protocol development has been completed and crew trainers have been certified. Pre-flight testing is scheduled to begin in mid-October.

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 03/01/2018)  Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
Abstracts for Journals and Proceedings Lee SMC, Westby CM, Stenger MG, Smith SM, Zwart S, Ploutz-Snyder RJ, Platts SH. "Defining the relationship between biomarkers of oxidative and inflammatory stress and the risk for atherosclerosis in astronauts during and after long-duration spaceflight." 2012 NASA Human Research Program Investigators’ Workshop, Houston, TX, February 14-16, 2012.

2012 NASA Human Research Program Investigators’ Workshop, Houston, TX, February 14-16, 2012. , Feb-2012

Project Title:  Defining the relation between biomarkers of oxidative and inflammatory stress and atherosclerosis risk in astronauts during and after long-duration spaceflight Reduce
Fiscal Year: FY 2012 
Division: Human Research 
Research Discipline/Element:
HRP HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Start Date: 10/01/2011  
End Date: 09/30/2015  
Task Last Updated: 08/30/2011 
Download report in PDF pdf
Principal Investigator/Affiliation:   Platts, Steven H. Ph.D. / NASA Johnson Space Center 
Address:  Cardiovascular Laboratory 
Biomedical Research and Environmental Sciences Division 
Houston , TX 77058 
Email: steven.platts-1@nasa.gov 
Phone: 281-483-8177  
Congressional District: 36 
Web:  
Organization Type: NASA CENTER 
Organization Name: NASA Johnson Space Center 
Joint Agency:  
Comments:  
Co-Investigator(s)
Affiliation: 
Lee, Stuart  Wyle Laboratories, Inc. 
Ploutz-Snyder, Robert  Universities Space Research Association 
Smith, Scott  NASA Johnson Space Center 
Stenger, Michael  Wyle Laboratories, Inc. 
Westby, Christian  Universities Space Research Association 
Project Information: Grant/Contract No. Internal Project 
Responsible Center: NASA JSC 
Grant Monitor: Baumann, David  
Center Contact:  
david.k.baumann@nasa.gov 
Solicitation / Funding Source: 2010 Crew Health NNJ10ZSA003N 
Grant/Contract No.: Internal Project 
Project Type: FLIGHT 
Flight Program: ISS 
TechPort: No 
No. of Post Docs:  
No. of PhD Candidates:  
No. of Master's Candidates:  
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:  
No. of PhD Degrees:  
No. of Master's Degrees:  
No. of Bachelor's Degrees:  
Human Research Program Elements: (1) HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Human Research Program Risks: (1) Arrhythmia:Risk of Cardiac Rhythm Problems
(2) Degen:Risk Of Cardiovascular Disease and Other Degenerative Tissue Effects From Radiation Exposure (IRP Rev F)
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) CV08:Can manifestations of sub-clinical or environmentally induced cardiovascular diseases during spaceflight be predicted?
(2) Degen07:Are there significant synergistic effects from other spaceflight factors (microgravity, stress, altered circadian rhythms, changes in immune responses, etc.) that modify the degenerative risk from space radiation?
Flight Assignment/Project Notes: ISS

Task Description: Atherosclerosis is the major contributor to cardiovascular disease-related morbidity and mortality. Research indicates that many of the risk factors commonly associated with atherosclerosis contribute to endothelial dysfunction, a process which presents early in life before angiographic evidence of disease and precedes the clinical manifestation of many cardiovascular disease-related disorders. In an effort to compensate for the initial risk factor-related disruptions to homeostasis, there is a compensatory upregulation of atheroprotective mechanisms. However, in the absence of appropriate risk factor management, these defense mechanisms may become overwhelmed and less able to reestablish normal function. Key systems that help maintain vascular homeostasis, and are susceptible to differential deleterious alterations, include those that help balance levels of oxidative and inflammatory stress. New evidence suggests that long duration spaceflight may promote oxidative and inflammatory stress through mechanisms such as radiation exposure, diet, physical inactivity, and psychological stress. However, there are no data supporting a causal link between biomarkers of oxidative and inflammatory stress and indices of vascular endothelial dysfunction in space flight. As such, we propose to examine the relation between biomarkers of oxidative and inflammatory stress and well established measures of vascular endothelial dysfunction (flow mediated dilation (FMD) and carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT)), in astronauts before, during, and after long duration spaceflight.

Research Impact/Earth Benefits: 0

Task Progress & Bibliography Information FY2012 
Task Progress: New project for FY2012.

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 03/01/2018)  Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
 None in FY 2012