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Fiscal Year: FY 2016  Task Last Updated:  10/12/2016 
PI Name: Bloomberg, Jacob J. Ph.D. 
Project Title: Developing Predictive Measures of Sensorimotor Adaptability to Produce Customized Countermeasure Prescriptions 
   
Division Name: Human Research 
Program/Discipline--
Element/Subdiscipline:
NSBRI--Sensorimotor Adaptation Team 
 
Joint Agency Name:   TechPort:  Yes 
Human Research Program Elements: (1) HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Human Research Program Risks: (1) HCI:Risk of Inadequate Human-Computer Interaction
 (2) Sensorimotor (SM):Risk of Impaired Control of Spacecraft, Associated Systems and Immediate Vehicle Egress Due to Vestibular/Sensorimotor Alterations Associated with Space Flight
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) SHFE-HCI-03:We need HCI guidelines (e.g., display configuration, screen-navigation) to mitigate the performance decrements identified in SHFE-HCI-08 due to the spaceflight environment (IRP Rev D)
 (2) SM24:SM24: Determine if the individual capacity to produce adaptive change (rate and extent) in sensorimotor function to transitions in gravitational environments can be predicted with preflight tests of sensorimotor adaptability (IRP Rev F)
Space Biology Element: None
Space Biology Cross-Element Discipline: None
Space Biology Special Category: None
PI Email: jacob.j.bloomberg@nasa.gov  Fax:  281-244-5734 
PI Organization Type: NASA CENTER  Phone: 281-483-0436  
Organization Name: NASA Johnson Space Center 
PI Address 1: Biomedical Research and Environmental Sciences Division 
PI Address 2: 2101 NASA Parkway, SK272 
PI Web Page:  
City: Houston  State: TX 
Zip Code: 77058-3607  Congressional District:  36 
Comments:  
Project Type: GROUND  Solicitation:  2011 Crew Health NNJ11ZSA002NA 
Start Date: 10/01/2012  End Date:  05/31/2016 
No. of Post Docs: No. of PhD Degrees: 
No. of PhD Candidates: No. of Master' Degrees: 
No. of Master's Candidates: No. of Bachelor's Degrees: 
No. of Bachelor's Candidates: Monitoring Center:  NSBRI 
Contact Monitor:   Contact Phone:   
Contact Email:  
Flight Program:  
Flight Assignment: NOTE: End date changed to 5/31/2016 per NSBRI (Ed., 11/5/15)

 

Key Personnel Changes/Previous PI:  
COI Name (Institution): Buccello-Stout, Regina   ( Wyle Integrated Sciences and Engineering Group )
Wood, Scott   ( Azusa Pacific University )
Cohen, Helen   ( Baylor College of Medicine )
Mulavara, Ajitkumar   ( Universities Space Research Association )
Peters, Brian   ( Wyle Laboratories )
Brady, Rachel   ( Wyle Integrated Sciences and Engineering Group )
Seidler, Rachael   ( University of Michigan ) 
Grant/Contract No.: NCC 9-58-SA02801 
Performance Goal No.:  
Performance Goal Text:

 

Task Description: Astronauts experience sensorimotor disturbances during the initial exposure to microgravity and during the readaptation phase following a return to an Earth-gravitational environment. These alterations may lead to disruption in the ability to perform mission critical functional tasks required during these gravitational transitions. Astronauts show significant inter-subject variation in adaptive capability following gravitational transitions. The ability to predict the manner and degree to which each individual astronaut will be affected would improve the effectiveness of a countermeasure comprised of a training program designed to enhance sensorimotor adaptability. Therefore the goal of this project was to develop a set of predictive measures capable of identifying individual differences in sensorimotor adaptability to aid in the design of sensorimotor adaptability training countermeasures that are customized for each crewmember's individual sensory bias and adaptive capacity.

To achieve these goals we pursued the following specific aims:

Specific Aim 1: Determine whether behavioral metrics of individual sensory bias predicts strategic responses and sensorimotor adaptability to novel sensory environments.

Specific Aim 2: Develop predictors of strategic responses and sensorimotor adaptability using brain structural and functional metrics.

Specific Aim 3: Determine whether specific genetic polymorphisms are associated with individual differences in strategic responses and sensorimotor adaptability to novel sensory environments.

Subjects performed behavioral tests that delineated individual sensory bias in tests of visual, vestibular, and proprioceptive function. Subjects were also tested for individual differences in brain white matter integrity (using diffusion tensor imaging, or DTI), functional network integrity (using resting state functional connectivity MRI), and functional MRI activation associated with sensorimotor adaptation task performance. We also determined whether specific genotypes were associated with individual differences in sensorimotor adaptability. Three distinct motor learning tests were used to characterize individual behavioral strategic responses and motor learning capability. The Locomotor Balance Test characterized the strategic initial locomotor responses to a novel walking environment. The Adaptive Functional Mobility Test (AFMT) and the Adaptive Manual Control Test represented tasks producing plastic-adaptive response to a novel sensory environment. Subjects performed these tests to determine if behavioral, neuroimaging and genetic metrics predicted individual strategic and motor learning capability. Behavioral metrics related to proprioceptive function, visual dependency, and sensory integration served as the best predictors of individual strategic and motor learning capability. Behavioral results indicated that performance and adaptability are specific to the environment being tested.

This study explored relationships between behavioral parameters and performance on three different types of adaptation tasks. Each task had a different combination of significant parameters and no single parameter was significant for all three motor learning tasks. Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) is an MRI technique used to assess white matter quality in the brain. The DTI results indicated that white matter microstructural integrity plays a role in how well individuals are able to respond to novel sensorimotor disturbances. Importantly, the white matter integrity of the corpus callosum was associated with enhanced performance suggesting that intact inter-hemispheric connectivity is an important factor for optimal responsiveness to novel changes in the sensory environment. Resting state functional connectivity MRI (fcMRI) was used to investigate individual differences in large-scale brain networks. These results demonstrated that specific patterns of functional connectivity between resting state networks involved in motor control and cognition are associated with individual differences in sensorimotor adaptation. The fMRI results indicated that a variety of frontal, temporal, and cingulate cortical and subcortical areas in which activation was predictive of individual differences in adaptability during a manual adaptation task. This suggests that some people might be more proficient at recruiting neural areas that allow for efficient adaptation learning. We determined whether genotypes for COMT, DRD2, BDNF, and Alpha 2 adrenergic receptor (DraI) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were associated with individual differences in strategic responses and sensorimotor adaptability to novel sensory environments. The DraI and COMT SNPs showed a trend towards distinguishing subjects who exhibit faster or slower responses and adaptation rates on two locomotor tasks. These findings were limited by small sample size, but show promising initial results that may be improved upon by collecting more subject data.

In conclusion this study revealed that behavioral, neuroimaging, and genetic metrics can predict individual responses to novel sensory environments and motor learning capability. Predictive power may be enhanced using composite measures composed of a mix of behavioral, neuroimaging, and genetic metrics. Further investigations with astronauts in actual spaceflight conditions will serve to further validate potential predictive metrics of adaptability. These results have important implications for adaptation training programs that facilitate astronaut adaptation to novel environments and for rehabilitation. Specifically, the prospect of identifying people who will likely have difficulty with sensorimotor adaptation would allow for more targeted training programs.

 

Rationale for HRP Directed Research:

 

Research Impact/Earth Benefits: Sensorimotor adaptability training programs have Earthbound application in rehabilitation of patients with balance disorders, and for fall prevention training among seniors. We have previously shown that training using variation in visual flow during treadmill exercise improves functional mobility in healthy older adults who were experiencing age-related postural instabilities (Buccello-Stout et al. 2008; 2013). Personalized medicine has become an important research topic. Many brain stimulation, physical therapy, and pharmacological approaches to movement disorders are efficacious for some individuals but not others. The ability to predict ahead of time which patients would be most responsive to differing types of treatments would clearly save time and costs, and increase patients' quality of life by providing targeted rehabilitation interventions targeted at individual sensory biases and ability to process sensory information.

Buccello-Stout, RR, Bloomberg, JJ, Cohen, HS, Whorton, EB, Weaver, GD, & Cromwell, RL. Effects of sensorimotor adaptation training on functional mobility in older adults. J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci. 63(5): 295-300. 2008.

Buccello-Stout RR, Cromwell RL, Bloomberg JJ, Whorton EB. Effects of sensorimotor adaptation training on head stability movement control in response to a lateral perturbation in older adults. The Journal of Aging and Physical Activity. 21: 272-289. 2013.

 

Task Progress: In an effort to increase efficiency and maximize the predictive power of our measures we collected data for Specific Aims 1 and 2 simultaneously on the same subjects. This involved behavioral testing in our labs at NASA/Johnson Space Center and neuroimaging at the University of Texas Medical Branch Victory Lakes Facility, which is located offsite. This approach had a number of benefits including increased data capture. By having the same subject perform both specific aims we were able to enhance our ability to detect how a wider range factors and their groupings can predict adaptability in a specific individual. This provides a much richer data base and potentially a better understanding of the predictive power of the selected factors.

Dr. Mulavara is currently conducting a complementary National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) study titled Developing Personalized Countermeasures for Sensorimotor Adaptability: A Bed Rest Study. This study will recall subjects who participated in the recent bed rest CFT70 campaign and spaceflight subjects (Functional Task Test) to investigate if predictive metrics based on behavioral, brain, and genetic markers can be used to retrospectively predict sensorimotor adaptability in post bed rest and spaceflight subjects. To aid this effort and to develop a complete set of predictive metrics we added several new behavioral measures. We also added genetic tests previously used to detect sensorimotor adaptability as possible metrics of adaptability. We called back our original subjects and tested them on these new metrics, which were added to the original set of potential predictive metrics obtained previously. During this reporting period data collection analysis was completed.

Data Collection at Azusa Pacific University (APU): The focus of the data collection at Dr. Wood's APU laboratory was to expand the set of behavioral predictive measures capable of identifying individual differences in the ability to adapt to novel discordant sensory environments. In the APU study the inter-subject variability during adaption to visual distortion lenses was measured in 27 subjects over 3 sessions. During this reporting period data collection analysis for the studies at APU was completed.

During this reporting period the following manuscripts were published:

Seidler RD, Mulavara AP, Bloomberg JJ, Peters BT. Individual predictors of sensorimotor adaptability. Front. Syst. Neurosci. 9:100. doi: 10.3389/fnsys.2015.00100, 2015.

Bloomberg JJ, Peters BT, Cohen HS and Mulavara AP. Enhancing astronaut performance using sensorimotor adaptability training. Front. Syst. Neurosci. 9:129.doi: 10.3389/fnsys.2015.00129, 2015.

In addition, during this reporting period 17 presentations at meetings were completed.

See also Bibliography section below.

 

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 05/16/2019) Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
Articles in Other Journals or Periodicals Eikema DA, Chien JH, Scott-Pandorf M, Peters BT, Bloomberg JJ, Myers S, Stergiou N, Mukherjee M. "Locomotor adaptation to support surface roll oscillations: reductions in postural coupling with the environment is enhanced by noisy plantar tactile stimulation." Experimental Brain Research, submitted as of October 2016. [Ed. note: recategorized as Other Journals since not yet published as of 8/28/2018] , Oct-2016
Articles in Peer-reviewed Journals Seidler RD, Mulavara AP, Bloomberg JJ, Peters BT. "Individual predictors of sensorimotor adaptability." Front Syst Neurosci. 2015 Jul 6;9:100. eCollection 2015. Review. http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fnsys.2015.00100 ; PubMed PMID: 26217197; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4491631 , Jul-2015
Articles in Peer-reviewed Journals Bloomberg JJ, Peters BT, Cohen HS, Mulavara AP. "Enhancing astronaut performance using sensorimotor adaptability training." Front Syst Neurosci. 2015 Sep 16;9:129. eCollection 2015. Review. http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fnsys.2015.00129 ; PubMed PMID: 26441561; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4584940 , Sep-2015
Articles in Peer-reviewed Journals Oddsson LI, Finkelstein MJ, Meissner S. "Feasibility of early functional rehabilitation in acute stroke survivors using the Balance-Bed–A technology that emulates microgravity." Front Syst Neurosci. 2015 May 27;9:83. http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fnsys.2015.00083 ; PubMed PMID: 26074789; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4445307 , May-2015
Articles in Peer-reviewed Journals Goel R, Kofman I, Jeevarajan J, De Dios Y, Cohen HS, Bloomberg JJ, Mulavara AP. "Using low levels of stochastic vestibular stimulation to improve balance function." PLoS One. 2015 Aug 21;10(8):e0136335. eCollection 2015. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0136335 ; PubMed PMID: 26295807; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4546608 , Aug-2015
Articles in Peer-reviewed Journals Goel R, De Dios YE, Gadd NE, Caldwell EE, Peters BT, Reschke MF, Bloomberg JJ, Oddsson LIE, Mulavara AP. "Assessing somatosensory utilization during unipedal postural control." Front Syst Neurosci. 2017 Apr 11;11:21. eCollection 2017. https://doi.org/10.3389/fnsys.2017.00021 ; PubMed PMID: 28443004; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5387047 , Apr-2017
Articles in Peer-reviewed Journals Mukherjee M, Eikema DJ, Chien JH, Myers SA, Scott-Pandorf M, Bloomberg JJ, Stergiou N. "Plantar tactile perturbations enhance transfer of split-belt locomotor adaptation." Exp Brain Res. 2015 Oct;233(10):3005-12. Epub 2015 Jul 14. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00221-015-4370-1 ; PubMed PMID: 26169104; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4575864 , Oct-2015
Articles in Peer-reviewed Journals Mulavara AP, Kofman IS, De Dios YE, Miller C, Peters BT, Goel R, Galvan-Garza R, Bloomberg JJ. "Using low levels of stochastic vestibular stimulation to improve locomotor stability." Front Syst Neurosci. 2015 Aug 24;9:117. eCollection 2015. https://doi.org/10.3389/fnsys.2015.00117 ; PubMed PMID: 26347619; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4547107 , Aug-2015
Articles in Peer-reviewed Journals Eikema DJ, Chien JH, Stergiou N, Myers SA, Scott-Pandorf MM, Bloomberg JJ, Mukherjee M. "Optic flow improves adaptability of spatiotemporal characteristics during split-belt locomotor adaptation with tactile stimulation." Exp Brain Res. 2016 Feb;234(2):511-22. Epub 2015 Nov 2. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00221-015-4484-5 ; PubMed PMID: 26525712; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4732903 , Feb-2016
Articles in Peer-reviewed Journals Ruitenberg MFL, De Dios YE, Gadd NE, Wood SJ, Reuter-Lorenz PA, Kofman I, Bloomberg JJ, Mulavara AP, Seidler RD. "Multi-day adaptation and savings in manual and locomotor tasks." J Mot Behav. 2018 Sep-Oct;50(5):517-27. Epub 2017 Sep 22. https://doi.org/10.1080/00222895.2017.1371110 ; PubMed PMID: 28937868 [Note: originally reported in October 2016 as "J Mot Behav. 2017 Sep 22:1-11. Published online: 22 Sep 2017."] , Sep-2018
Articles in Peer-reviewed Journals Schubert MC, Stitz J, Cohen HS, Sangi-Haghpeykar H, Mulavara AP, Peters BT, Bloomberg JJ. "Prototype tests of vertical and torsional alignment nulling for screening vestibular function." J Vestib Res. 2017;27(2-3):173-6. https://doi.org/10.3233/VES-170618 ; PubMed PMID: 29064832 ; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5659207 , Jun-2017
Articles in Peer-reviewed Journals Cohen HS, Stitz J, Sangi-Haghpeykar H, Williams SP, Mulavara AP, Peters BT, Bloomberg JJ. "Utility of quick oculomotor tests for screening the vestibular system in the subacute and chronic populations." Acta Otolaryngol. 2018 Apr;138(4):382-6. Published online 16 Nov 2017. https://doi.org/10.1080/00016489.2017.1398838 ; PubMed PMID: 29141478 ; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5864528 , Apr-2018
Articles in Peer-reviewed Journals Cohen HS, Stitz J, Sangi-Haghpeykar H, Williams SP, Mulavara AP, Peters BT, Bloomberg JJ. "Tandem walking as a quick screening test for vestibular disorders." Laryngoscope. 2018 Jul;128(7):1687-91. Epub 2017 Dec 11. https://doi.org/10.1002/lary.27022 ; PubMed PMID: 29226324 ; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5995610 , Jul-2018
Articles in Peer-reviewed Journals Nair MA, Mulavara AP, Bloomberg JJ, Sangi-Haghpeykar H, Cohen HS. "Visual dependence and spatial orientation in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo." J Vestib Res. 2018;27(5-6):279-86. https://doi.org/10.3233/VES-170623 ; PubMed PMID: 29400684; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5801771 , Feb-2018
Articles in Peer-reviewed Journals Ruitenberg MFL, Koppelmans V, De Dios YE, Gadd NE, Wood SJ, Reuter-Lorenz PA, Kofman I, Bloomberg JJ, Mulavara AP, Seidler RD. "Neural correlates of multi-day learning and savings in sensorimotor adaptation." Sci Rep. 2018 Sep 24;8(1):14286. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-32689-4 ; PubMed PMID: 30250049; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC6155344 , Sep-2018
Articles in Peer-reviewed Journals Cohen HS, Mulavara AP, Stitz J, Sangi-Haghpeykar H, Williams SP, Peters BT, Bloomberg JJ. "Screening for vestibular disorders using the modified clinical test of sensory interaction and balance and tandem walking with eyes closed." Otol Neurotol. 2019 Feb 27. [Epub ahead of print] https://doi.org/10.1097/MAO.0000000000002173 ; PubMed PMID: 30829953 , Feb-2019
Awards Bloomberg J. "American Astronautical Society Award, June 2014." Jun-2014
Awards Bloomberg J. "NASA Johnson Space Center Director's Commendation Award, September 2015." Sep-2015
Download in PDF pdf     
Fiscal Year: FY 2015  Task Last Updated:  10/14/2014 
PI Name: Bloomberg, Jacob J. Ph.D. 
Project Title: Developing Predictive Measures of Sensorimotor Adaptability to Produce Customized Countermeasure Prescriptions 
   
Division Name: Human Research 
Program/Discipline--
Element/Subdiscipline:
NSBRI--Sensorimotor Adaptation Team 
 
Joint Agency Name:   TechPort:  Yes 
Human Research Program Elements: (1) HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Human Research Program Risks: (1) HCI:Risk of Inadequate Human-Computer Interaction
 (2) Sensorimotor (SM):Risk of Impaired Control of Spacecraft, Associated Systems and Immediate Vehicle Egress Due to Vestibular/Sensorimotor Alterations Associated with Space Flight
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) SHFE-HCI-03:We need HCI guidelines (e.g., display configuration, screen-navigation) to mitigate the performance decrements identified in SHFE-HCI-08 due to the spaceflight environment (IRP Rev D)
 (2) SM24:SM24: Determine if the individual capacity to produce adaptive change (rate and extent) in sensorimotor function to transitions in gravitational environments can be predicted with preflight tests of sensorimotor adaptability (IRP Rev F)
Space Biology Element: None
Space Biology Cross-Element Discipline: None
Space Biology Special Category: None
PI Email: jacob.j.bloomberg@nasa.gov  Fax:  281-244-5734 
PI Organization Type: NASA CENTER  Phone: 281-483-0436  
Organization Name: NASA Johnson Space Center 
PI Address 1: Biomedical Research and Environmental Sciences Division 
PI Address 2: 2101 NASA Parkway, SK272 
PI Web Page:  
City: Houston  State: TX 
Zip Code: 77058-3607  Congressional District:  36 
Comments:  
Project Type: GROUND  Solicitation:  2011 Crew Health NNJ11ZSA002NA 
Start Date: 10/01/2012  End Date:  05/31/2016 
No. of Post Docs: No. of PhD Degrees: 
No. of PhD Candidates: No. of Master' Degrees: 
No. of Master's Candidates: No. of Bachelor's Degrees: 
No. of Bachelor's Candidates: Monitoring Center:  NSBRI 
Contact Monitor:   Contact Phone:   
Contact Email:  
Flight Program:  
Flight Assignment: NOTE: End date changed to 5/31/2016 per NSBRI (Ed., 11/5/15)

 

Key Personnel Changes/Previous PI:  
COI Name (Institution): Buccello-Stout, Regina   ( Wyle Integrated Sciences and Engineering Group )
Wood, Scott   ( Azusa Pacific University )
Cohen, Helen   ( Baylor College of Medicine )
Mulavara, Ajitkumar   ( Universities Space Research Association )
Peters, Brian   ( Wyle Laboratories )
Brady, Rachel   ( Wyle Integrated Sciences and Engineering Group )
Seidler, Rachael   ( University of Michigan ) 
Grant/Contract No.: NCC 9-58-SA02801 
Performance Goal No.:  
Performance Goal Text:

 

Task Description: Astronauts experience sensorimotor disturbances during the initial exposure to microgravity and during the readapation phase following a return to a gravitational environment. These alterations may lead to disruption in the ability to perform mission critical functional tasks during and after these gravitational transitions. Astronauts show significant inter-subject variation in adaptive capability following gravitational transitions. The ability to predict the manner and degree to which each individual astronaut will be affected would improve the effectiveness of a countermeasure comprised of a training program designed to enhance sensorimotor adaptability. Due to this inherent individual variability we need to develop predictive measures of sensorimotor adaptability that will allow us to predict, before actual space flight, which crewmember will experience challenges in adaptive capacity. Thus, obtaining this information will allow us to design and implement better sensorimotor adaptability training countermeasures that will be customized for each crewmember's unique adaptive capabilities. Therefore, the goals of this project are to: 1) develop a set of predictive measures capable of identifying individual differences in sensorimotor adaptability, and 2) use this information to design sensorimotor adaptability training countermeasures that are customized for each crewmember's individual sensory bias and adaptive capacity.

To achieve these goals we have the following specific aims:

Specific Aim 1: Determine whether behavioral metrics of individual sensory bias predict sensorimotor adaptability. Subjects show individual variation in the degree to which sensory inputs are weighted and reorganized to produce motor output during exposure to discordant sensory conditions. These individual sensory biases may serve as predictors of adaptability. For this aim, subjects will perform tests that will delineate individual sensory biases in tests of visual, vestibular, and proprioceptive function. They will then be tested to determine if these metrics predict how quickly they adapt to a novel discordant sensory environment.

Specific Aim 2: Determine if individual capability for strategic and plastic-adaptive responses predicts sensorimotor adaptability. The transition from one sensorimotor state to another consists of two main mechanisms: strategic and plastic-adaptive. Strategic modifications represent immediate and transitory changes in control that are employed to deal with short-term changes in the prevailing environment. If these changes are prolonged then plastic-adaptive changes are evoked that modify central nervous system function to automate new behavioral responses. For this aim, each subject's strategic and plastic-adaptive abilities will be assessed using a test of locomotor function designed specifically to delineate both mechanisms. Subjects will then be tested to determine if these measures predict how quickly they adapt to a novel discordant sensory environment.

Specific Aim 3: Develop predictors of sensorimotor adaptability using brain structural and functional metrics. We will measure individual differences in regional brain volumes (structural magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI), white matter integrity (diffusion tensor imaging, or DTI), functional network integrity (resting state functional connectivity MRI), and sensorimotor adaptation task-related functional brain activation (functional MRI). Subjects will then be tested to determine if these metrics predict how quickly they behaviorally adapt to a novel discordant sensory environment.

Specific Aim 4: Determine if individualized training prescriptions based on predictive metrics can be used to optimize sensorimotor adaptability training countermeasures. To determine if predictive adaptability metrics can be used to design individualized training programs we will examine a test case focusing on improving adaptive performance of visually dependent subjects. Subjects who are identified in Experiment 1, as being visually dependent with reduced adaptive capability, will receive individualized training prescriptions designed to reduce their dependence on vision and increase their ability to use vestibular information for control of movement. The training program will have two components. 1) Subjects will walk on a treadmill-motion base system while viewing discordant visual scenes to reduce dependency on vision along with support-surface motion to challenge gait stability. 2) During this training subjects will receive stimuli (vestibular stochastic resonance) to enhance vestibular signal detection. We anticipate that these two components will act in synergy during training to both reduce visual dependency while increasing dependence on vestibular information. Training efficacy will be assessed by comparing the performance of trained and control visually dependent subjects on how quickly they adapt to a novel discordant sensory environment.

In an effort to increase efficiency and maximize the predictive power of our measures we are currently completing the data collection for Specific Aims 1, 2, and 3 simultaneously on the same subjects (n=15). This involves behavioral testing in our labs at NASA/Johnson Space Center and neuroimaging at the University of Texas Medical Branch Victory Lakes Facility, which is located offsite. This approach had a number of benefits including increased data capture. By having the same subject perform all three specific aims we can enhance our ability to detect how wider range factors and their grouping can predict adaptability in a specific individual. This provides a much richer data base and potentially a better understanding of the predictive power of the selected factors.

 

Rationale for HRP Directed Research:

 

Research Impact/Earth Benefits: Sensorimotor adaptability training programs have Earthbound application in rehabilitation of patients with balance disorders, and for fall prevention training among seniors. We have previously shown that training using variation in visual flow during treadmill exercise improves functional mobility in healthy older adults who were experiencing age-related postural instabilities (Buccello-Stout et al. 2008; 2013). This project will provide measures that will allow individualized training programs that serve to enhance the efficacy of ground-based rehabilitation and training programs.

Buccello-Stout, RR, Bloomberg, JJ, Cohen, HS, Whorton, EB, Weaver, GD, & Cromwell, RL. Effects of sensorimotor adaptation training on functional mobility in older adults. J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci. 63(5): 295-300. 2008.

Buccello-Stout RR, Cromwell RL, Bloomberg JJ, Whorton EB. Effects of sensorimotor adaptation training on head stability movement control in response to a lateral perturbation in older adults. The Journal of Aging and Physical Activity. 21: 272-289. 2013.

 

Task Progress: In an effort to increase efficiency and maximize the predictive power of our measures we are currently completing the data collection for Specific Aims 1, 2, and 3 simultaneously on the same subjects (n=15). This involves behavioral testing in our labs at NASA/Johnson Space Center and neuroimaging at the University of Texas Medical Branch Victory Lakes Facility, which is located offsite. This approach has a number of benefits including increased data capture. By having the same subject perform all three specific aims we can enhance our ability to detect how wider range factors and their grouping can predict adaptability in a specific individual. This provides a much richer data base and potentially a better understanding of the predictive power of the selected factors. Data collection for Specific Aims 1, 2, and 3 will be completed by December 2014.

Significant improvements were made to our data-collection process for the Treadmill Visual Dependency and Novel Sensory Discordance tests. These tests require simultaneous data collection of video-based motion capture and analog data. We consolidated the data collection from three to two computers while still assuring that the video-based motion capture data and the analog data were synchronized. This allowed us to eliminate several post-processing steps to synchronize the data, saving up to an hour of analysis time per data collection session.

We have received approval from the NASA Institutional Review Board (IRB) and completed a NASA Test Readiness Review (TRR) to conduct the study supporting Specific Aim 4. We are currently conducting pilot testing and plan to begin data collection for Specific Aim 4 in Sept. 2014. Data Collection at Azusa Pacific University (APU): The focus of the data collection at Dr. Wood's APU laboratory is to expand the set of predictive measures capable of identifying individual differences in the ability to adapt to novel discordant sensory environments. As with the primary data collection at NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC), three sets of predictor tests have been implemented to delineate individual sensory biases or asymmetries in tests of visual, vestibular, and proprioceptive function. The ability to adapt to discordant sensory cues will be assessed by improvements in time-to-completion of an obstacle course over a foam surface while wearing visual distortion lenses. This past year five undergraduate students assisted Dr. Wood in implementing the tests (described in the Main Findings section). During the next phase, thirty students will be recruited to perform each of the following tests. We expect both the overlapping measures in another research setting as well as the unique features of the tests implemented at APU will enhance our ability to generalize results towards a comprehensive set of predictive tests to determine individual capability for rapid sensorimotor adaptation.

 

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 05/16/2019) Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
Abstracts for Journals and Proceedings Bloomberg JJ, Batson CD, Buxton RE, Feiveson AH, Kofman IS, Lee SMC, Miller CA, Mulavara AP, Peters BT, Phillips T, Platts SH, Ploutz-Snyder LL, Reschke MF, Ryder JW, Stenger MB, Taylor LC, Wood SJ. "Understanding the effects of long-duration space flight on astronaut functional task performance." 3rd Annual International Space Station (ISS) Research and Development Conference, Chicago, Illinois, June 17-19, 2014.

3rd Annual International Space Station (ISS) Research and Development Conference, Chicago, Illinois, June 17-19, 2014. http://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/20140005022.pdf ; accessed 9/23/16. , Jun-2014

Abstracts for Journals and Proceedings Bloomberg JJ, Peters BT, Mulavara AP, Miller CA, Batson CD, Wood SJ, Guined JR, Cohen HS, Buccello-Stout R, De Dios YE, Kofman IS, Szcesy DL, Erdeniz B, Koppelmans V, Seidler RD. "Customizing countermeasure prescriptions using predictive measures of sensorimotor adaptability." 2014 NASA Human Research Program Investigators’ Workshop, Galveston, TX, February 12-13, 2014.

2014 NASA Human Research Program Investigators’ Workshop, Galveston, TX, February 12-13, 2014. http://www.hou.usra.edu/meetings/hrp2014/pdf/3121.pdf , Feb-2014

Abstracts for Journals and Proceedings Eikema D-J A, Chien JH, Stergiou N, Scott-Pandorf M, Peters B, Bloomberg J, Mukherjee M. "Locomotor adaptation to support surface perturbations is characterized by environmental decoupling." Neuroscience 2014, Washington, DC, November 15-19, 2014.

Neuroscience 2014, Washington, DC, November 15-19, 2014. Available at: http://www.abstractsonline.com/Plan/ViewAbstract.aspx?sKey=90c50d3d-1fe0-4684-a570-af1687df8a9e&cKey=17ec2b51-be12-4f05-be03-693379037e55&mKey=54c85d94-6d69-4b09-afaa-502c0e680ca7 ; accessed 9/23/16. , Nov-2014

Abstracts for Journals and Proceedings Galvan RC, Bloomberg JJ, Mulavara AP, Clark TK, Merfeld DM, Oman CM. "Improving sensorimotor function and adaptation using stochastic vestibular stimulation." 2014 NASA Human Research Program Investigators’ Workshop, Galveston, TX, February 12-13, 2014.

2014 NASA Human Research Program Investigators’ Workshop, Galveston, TX, February 12-13, 2014. http://www.hou.usra.edu/meetings/hrp2014/pdf/3102.pdf , Feb-2014

Awards Bloomberg J. "Received an award for top research achievements on the ISS at the 3rd Annual ISS Research and Development Conference in Chicago, Ill, June 2014." Jun-2014
Download in PDF pdf     
Fiscal Year: FY 2014  Task Last Updated:  10/16/2013 
PI Name: Bloomberg, Jacob J. Ph.D. 
Project Title: Developing Predictive Measures of Sensorimotor Adaptability to Produce Customized Countermeasure Prescriptions 
   
Division Name: Human Research 
Program/Discipline--
Element/Subdiscipline:
NSBRI--Sensorimotor Adaptation Team 
 
Joint Agency Name:   TechPort:  Yes 
Human Research Program Elements: (1) HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Human Research Program Risks: (1) HCI:Risk of Inadequate Human-Computer Interaction
 (2) Sensorimotor (SM):Risk of Impaired Control of Spacecraft, Associated Systems and Immediate Vehicle Egress Due to Vestibular/Sensorimotor Alterations Associated with Space Flight
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) SHFE-HCI-03:We need HCI guidelines (e.g., display configuration, screen-navigation) to mitigate the performance decrements identified in SHFE-HCI-08 due to the spaceflight environment (IRP Rev D)
 (2) SM24:SM24: Determine if the individual capacity to produce adaptive change (rate and extent) in sensorimotor function to transitions in gravitational environments can be predicted with preflight tests of sensorimotor adaptability (IRP Rev F)
Space Biology Element: None
Space Biology Cross-Element Discipline: None
Space Biology Special Category: None
PI Email: jacob.j.bloomberg@nasa.gov  Fax:  281-244-5734 
PI Organization Type: NASA CENTER  Phone: 281-483-0436  
Organization Name: NASA Johnson Space Center 
PI Address 1: Biomedical Research and Environmental Sciences Division 
PI Address 2: 2101 NASA Parkway, SK272 
PI Web Page:  
City: Houston  State: TX 
Zip Code: 77058-3607  Congressional District:  36 
Comments:  
Project Type: GROUND  Solicitation:  2011 Crew Health NNJ11ZSA002NA 
Start Date: 10/01/2012  End Date:  09/30/2015 
No. of Post Docs: No. of PhD Degrees: 
No. of PhD Candidates: No. of Master' Degrees: 
No. of Master's Candidates: No. of Bachelor's Degrees: 
No. of Bachelor's Candidates: Monitoring Center:  NSBRI 
Contact Monitor:   Contact Phone:   
Contact Email:  
Flight Program:  
Flight Assignment:

 

Key Personnel Changes/Previous PI:  
COI Name (Institution): Buccello-Stout, Regina   ( Wyle Integrated Sciences and Engineering Group )
Wood, Scott   ( Azusa Pacific University )
Cohen, Helen   ( Baylor College of Medicine )
Mulavara, Ajitkumar   ( Universities Space Research Association )
Peters, Brian   ( Wyle Laboratories, Inc. )
Brady, Rachel   ( Wyle Integrated Sciences and Engineering Group )
Seidler, Rachael   ( University of Michigan, Ann Arbor ) 
Grant/Contract No.: NCC 9-58-SA02801 
Performance Goal No.:  
Performance Goal Text:

 

Task Description: Astronauts experience sensorimotor disturbances during the initial exposure to microgravity and during the readapation phase following a return to a gravitational environment. These alterations may lead to disruption in the ability to perform mission critical functional tasks during and after these gravitational transitions. Astronauts show significant inter-subject variation in adaptive capability following gravitational transitions. The ability to predict the manner and degree to which each individual astronaut will be affected would improve the effectiveness of a countermeasure comprised of a training program designed to enhance sensorimotor adaptability. Due to this inherent individual variability we need to develop predictive measures of sensorimotor adaptability that will allow us to predict, before actual space flight, which crewmember will experience challenges in adaptive capacity. Thus, obtaining this information will allow us to design and implement better sensorimotor adaptability training countermeasures that will be customized for each crewmember's unique adaptive capabilities. Therefore the goals of this project are to: 1) develop a set of predictive measures capable of identifying individual differences in sensorimotor adaptability, and 2) use this information to design sensorimotor adaptability training countermeasures that are customized for each crewmember's individual sensory bias and adaptive capacity.

To achieve these goals we have the following specific aims:

Specific Aim 1: Determine whether behavioral metrics of individual sensory bias predicts sensorimotor adaptability. Subjects show individual variation in the degree to which sensory inputs are weighted and reorganized to produce motor output during exposure to discordant sensory conditions. These individual sensory biases may serve as predictors of adaptability. For this aim, subjects will perform tests that will delineate individual sensory biases in tests of visual, vestibular and proprioceptive function. They will then be tested to determine if these metrics predict how quickly they adapt to a novel discordant sensory environment.

Specific Aim 2: Determine if individual capability for strategic and plastic-adaptive responses predicts sensorimotor adaptability. The transition from one sensorimotor state to another consists of two main mechanisms: strategic and plastic-adaptive. Strategic modifications represent immediate and transitory changes in control that are employed to deal with short-term changes in the prevailing environment. If these changes are prolonged then plastic-adaptive changes are evoked that modify central nervous system function to automate new behavioral responses. For this aim, each subject's strategic and plastic-adaptive abilities will be assessed using two tests of locomotor function designed specifically to delineate both mechanisms. Subjects will then be tested to determine if these measures predict how quickly they adapt to a novel discordant sensory environment.

Specific Aim 3: Develop predictors of sensorimotor adaptability using brain structural and functional metrics. We will measure individual differences in regional brain volumes (structural MRI), white matter integrity (diffusion tensor imaging, or DTI), functional network integrity (resting state functional connectivity MRI), and sensorimotor adaptation task-related functional brain activation (functional MRI). Subjects will then be tested to determine if these metrics predict how quickly they behaviorally adapt to a novel discordant sensory environment.

Specific Aim 4: Determine if individualized training prescriptions based on predictive metrics can be used to optimize sensorimotor adaptability training countermeasures. To determine if predictive adaptability metrics can be used to design individualized training programs we will examine a test case focusing on improving adaptive performance of visually dependent subjects. Subjects who are identified in Experiment 1, as being visually dependent with reduced adaptive capability will receive individualized training prescriptions designed to reduce their dependence on vision and increase their ability to use vestibular information for control of movement. The training program will have two components. 1) Subjects will walk on a treadmill-motion base system while viewing discordant visual scenes to reduce dependency on vision along with support-surface motion to challenge gait stability. 2) During this training subjects will receive stimuli (vestibular stochastic resonance) to enhance vestibular signal detection. We anticipate that these two components will act in synergy during training to both reduce visual dependency while increasing dependence on vestibular information. Training efficacy will be assessed by comparing the performance of trained and control visually dependent subjects on how quickly they adapt to a novel discordant sensory environment.

In an effort to increase efficiency and data capture we are currently conducting data collection for Specific Aims 1, 3, and part of 2 simultaneously on the same subjects.

 

Rationale for HRP Directed Research:

 

Research Impact/Earth Benefits: Sensorimotor adaptability training programs have Earthbound application in rehabilitation of patients with balance disorders, and for fall prevention training among seniors. We have previously shown that training using variation in visual flow during treadmill exercise improves functional mobility in healthy older adults who were experiencing age-related postural instabilities (Buccello-Stout et al. 2008; 2013). This project will provide measures that will allow individualized training programs that serve to enhance the efficacy of ground-based rehabilitation and training programs.

Buccello-Stout, RR, Bloomberg, JJ, Cohen, HS, Whorton, EB, Weaver, GD, & Cromwell, RL. Effects of sensorimotor adaptation training on functional mobility in older adults. J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci. 63(5): 295-300. 2008.

Buccello-Stout RR, Cromwell RL, Bloomberg JJ, Whorton EB. Effects of sensorimotor adaptation training on head stability movement control in response to a lateral perturbation in older adults. The Journal of Aging and Physical Activity. 21: 272-289. 2013.

 

Task Progress: In an effort to increase efficiency we decided to complete the data collection for Specific Aims 1, 3, and part of 2 simultaneously on the same subjects. This approach had a number of benefits including: 1) Increased data capture: by having the same subjects perform all three specific aims we can enhance our ability to detect how a wider range factors can predict adaptability in a specific individual. This provides a much richer data base and potentially a better understanding of the predictive power of the selected factors. 2) Minimize prior adaptive experience: Subjects who have previously participated in any of our adaptation experiments were excluded from this study because that prior experience may serve as a training modality and therefore potentially influence our results. To satisfy this requirement we requested that the NASA Test Subject Office only recruit completely naive subjects. Given this constraint it was more efficient to perform Specific Aims 1, 2, and 3 in a single block. 3) Minimize the number of MRI scans: This approach allowed us to leverage on-going scanning activities in the lab and therefore increase efficiency and reduce costs. We are currently in the process of collecting data.

In order to perform this integrated data collection procedure the following activities were completed: 1) Institutional Review Board approval was obtained. 2) A NASA Test Readiness Review was completed. 3) Pilot experimental dry runs were conducted at the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) Victory Lakes MRI facility to practice and finalize the neuroimaging procedures required for Specific Aim 3. 4) Procedures to measure proprioceptive acuity were developed that were superior to those described in the initial proposal. In collaboration with the NASA-JSC Exercise Physiology Lab a more accurate and repeatable measure of proprioceptive acuity was implemented entailing the use of an isokinetic dynamometer that measures an individual's ability to reproduce a predetermined joint angle after passively moving the limb.

 

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 05/16/2019) Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
Abstracts for Journals and Proceedings Bloomberg JJ, Mulavara AP, Peters BT, Wood SJ, Reschke MF. "Sensorimotor countermeasures: Improving performance during gravitational transitions." 84th Annual Scientific Meeting, Aerospace Medical Association, Chicago, IL, May 12-16, 2013.

Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine. 2013 Apr;84(4):422. , Apr-2013

Abstracts for Journals and Proceedings Bloomberg JJ, Peters BT, Mulavara AP, Brady RA, Buccello-Stout R, Miller CA, Batson CD, Wood SJ, Cohen HS, Seidler RD. "Developing predictive measures of sensorimotor adaptability to produce customized countermeasure prescriptions." 2013 NASA Human Research Program Investigators’ Workshop, Galveston, TX, February 12-14, 2013.

2013 NASA Human Research Program Investigators’ Workshop, Galveston, TX, February 12-14, 2013. , Feb-2013

Articles in Peer-reviewed Journals Buccello-Stout RR, Cromwell RL, Bloomberg JJ, Whorton EB. "Sensorimotor adaptation training's effect on head stabilization in response to a lateral perturbation in older adults." The Journal of Aging and Physical Activity. 2013 Jul;21(3):272-89. Epub 2012 Sep 18. PubMed PMID: 23006335 , Jul-2013
Articles in Peer-reviewed Journals Peters BT, Brady RA, Batson CD, Guined JR, Ploutz-Snyder RJ, Mulavara AP, Bloomberg JJ. "Adaptation in locomotor stability, cognition, and metabolic cost during sensory discordance." Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine. 2013 Jun;84(6):567-72. PubMed PMID: 23745284 ; http://dx.doi.org/10.3357/ASEM.3529.2013 , Jun-2013
Awards Bloomberg J. "JSC Group Achievement Award for the Development of the Sensorimotor Adaptability Training System, June 2013." Jun-2013
Download in PDF pdf     
Fiscal Year: FY 2013  Task Last Updated:  10/24/2012 
PI Name: Bloomberg, Jacob J. Ph.D. 
Project Title: Developing Predictive Measures of Sensorimotor Adaptability to Produce Customized Countermeasure Prescriptions 
   
Division Name: Human Research 
Program/Discipline--
Element/Subdiscipline:
NSBRI--Sensorimotor Adaptation Team 
 
Joint Agency Name:   TechPort:  Yes 
Human Research Program Elements: (1) HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Human Research Program Risks: (1) HCI:Risk of Inadequate Human-Computer Interaction
 (2) Sensorimotor (SM):Risk of Impaired Control of Spacecraft, Associated Systems and Immediate Vehicle Egress Due to Vestibular/Sensorimotor Alterations Associated with Space Flight
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) SHFE-HCI-03:We need HCI guidelines (e.g., display configuration, screen-navigation) to mitigate the performance decrements identified in SHFE-HCI-08 due to the spaceflight environment (IRP Rev D)
 (2) SM24:SM24: Determine if the individual capacity to produce adaptive change (rate and extent) in sensorimotor function to transitions in gravitational environments can be predicted with preflight tests of sensorimotor adaptability (IRP Rev F)
Space Biology Element: None
Space Biology Cross-Element Discipline: None
Space Biology Special Category: None
PI Email: jacob.j.bloomberg@nasa.gov  Fax:  281-244-5734 
PI Organization Type: NASA CENTER  Phone: 281-483-0436  
Organization Name: NASA Johnson Space Center 
PI Address 1: Biomedical Research and Environmental Sciences Division 
PI Address 2: 2101 NASA Parkway, SK272 
PI Web Page:  
City: Houston  State: TX 
Zip Code: 77058-3607  Congressional District:  36 
Comments:  
Project Type: GROUND  Solicitation:  2011 Crew Health NNJ11ZSA002NA 
Start Date: 10/01/2012  End Date:  09/30/2015 
No. of Post Docs:   No. of PhD Degrees:   
No. of PhD Candidates:   No. of Master' Degrees:   
No. of Master's Candidates:   No. of Bachelor's Degrees:   
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:   Monitoring Center:  NSBRI 
Contact Monitor:   Contact Phone:   
Contact Email:  
Flight Program:  
Flight Assignment:

 

Key Personnel Changes/Previous PI:  
COI Name (Institution): Brady, Rachel   ( Wyle Laboratories, Inc. )
Buccello-Stout, Regina   ( Wyle Laboratories, Inc. )
Cohen, Helen   ( Baylor College of Medicine )
Mulavara, Ajitkumar   ( Universities Space Research Association )
Peters, Brian   ( Wyle Laboratories, Inc. )
Seidler, Rachael   ( University of Michigan Ann Arbor )
Wood, Scott   ( NASA Johnson Space Center ) 
Grant/Contract No.: NCC 9-58-SA02801 
Performance Goal No.:  
Performance Goal Text:

 

Task Description: A targeted research area described in the current NASA Research Announcement is to: "Develop a pre-flight sensorimotor adaptability assessment program that will identify those individuals who are likely to experience difficulty with gravitational transitions and sensorimotor adaptation and validate interventions or countermeasures." In response to this call the goals of this project are to: 1) develop a set of predictive measures capable of identifying individual differences in sensorimotor adaptability, and 2) use this information to design sensorimotor adaptability training countermeasures that are customized for each crewmember’s individual sensory bias and adaptive capacity. We have been developing a sensorimotor adaptability (SA) training program to facilitate rapid adaptation to novel gravitational environments. Information from this proposed study will allow us to customize the SA training program based on a crewmember's individual sensory biases and adaptive capacity optimizing the efficacy of the countermeasure prescription.

To achieve these goals we will pursue the following specific aims:

Aim 1: Determine whether behavioral metrics of individual sensory bias predicts sensorimotor adaptability. For this aim, subjects will perform tests that will delineate individual sensory bias in tests of visual, vestibular and proprioceptive function. They will then be tested to determine if these metrics predict how quickly they adapt to a novel discordant sensory environment.

Aim 2: Determine if individual capability for strategic and plastic-adaptive responses predicts sensorimotor adaptability. The transition from one sensorimotor state to another consists of two main mechanisms: strategic and plastic-adaptive. Strategic modifications represent immediate and transitory changes in control that are employed to deal with short-term changes in the prevailing environment. If these changes are prolonged then plastic-adaptive changes are evoked that modify central nervous system function to automate new behavioral responses. For this aim, each subject’s strategic and plastic-adaptive motor learning abilities will be assessed using two tests of locomotor function designed specifically to delineate both mechanisms. Subjects will then be tested to determine if these measures predict how quickly they adapt to a novel discordant sensory environment.

Aim 3: Develop predictors of sensorimotor adaptability using brain structural and functional metrics. We will measure individual differences in regional brain volumes (structural MRI), white matter integrity (diffusion tensor imaging, or DTI), functional network integrity (resting state functional connectivity MRI), and sensorimotor adaptation task-related functional brain activation (functional MRI). Subjects will then be tested to determine if these metrics predict how fast they behaviorally adapt to a novel discordant sensory environment.

Aim 4: Determine if individualized training prescriptions based on predictive metrics can be used to optimize sensorimotor adaptability training countermeasures. To achieve this aim we will examine a test case focusing on improving adaptive performance of visually dependent subjects. Subjects identified in Aim 1 as being visually dependent with reduced adaptive capability will receive individualized training prescriptions designed to reduce their dependence on vision and increase their ability to use vestibular information for control of movement. As part of a specialized training program, subjects will walk on a treadmill-motion base system while experiencing discordant visual scenes along with increased support surface motion. During this training subjects will receive stimuli to enhance vestibular signal detection to aid in dynamic balance control. Training efficacy will be assessed by comparing the performance of trained and control subjects on how quickly they adapt to a novel discordant sensory environment.

 

Rationale for HRP Directed Research:

 

Research Impact/Earth Benefits: 0

 

Task Progress: New project for FY2013.

 

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 05/16/2019) Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing