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Fiscal Year: FY 2009  Task Last Updated:  01/20/2009 
PI Name: Koscheyev, Victor S Ph.D. 
Project Title: Test and Evaluation of Liquid Cooling Garments 
   
Division Name: Human Research 
Program/Discipline--
Element/Subdiscipline:
HUMAN RESEARCH--Operational and clinical research 
 
Joint Agency Name:  
Human Research Program Elements: (1) HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Human Research Program Risks:: (1) EVA:Risk of Compromised EVA Crew Health and Performance Due to Inadequate EVA Suit Systems
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) EVA08:What are the metabolic costs of expected nominal & contingency suited tasks in exploration gravity environments and how can heat produced during exploration EVA effectively be removed?
PI Email: kosch002@umn.edu  Fax:  612-625-5149 
PI Organization Type: UNIVERSITY  Phone: 612-625-8827  
Organization Name: University of Minnesota 
PI Address 1: Jackson Hall, Department of Integrative Biology and Physiology 
PI Address 2: 321 Church Street, SE 
City: Minneapolis  State: MN 
Zip Code: 55455  Congressional District: 
Comments:  
Project Type: GROUND  Solicitation:  Directed Research 
Start Date: 06/01/2007  End Date:  12/31/2008 
No. of Post Docs: No. of PhD Degrees: 
No. of PhD Candidates: No. of Master' Degrees:   
No. of Master's Candidates:   No. of Bachelor's Degrees:   
No. of Bachelor's Candidates: 16  Monitoring Center:  NASA JSC 
Contact Monitor:   Contact Phone:   
Contact Email:  
Flight Program:  
Flight Assignment: NOTE: Received NCE to 12/31/2008 (from 12/31/2007) per PI (3/08)

NOTE: Received NCE to 3/31/2008 per PI (12/07)

 

Key Personnel Changes/Previous PI:  
COI Name (Institution): Leon, Gloria R. ( University of Minnesota ) 
Grant/Contract No.: NNX07AI90A 
Performance Goal No.:  
Performance Goal Text:

 

Task Description: This research evaluated the physiological functioning and subjective comfort of subjects while donned in each of five liquid cooling garments. The goal was to identify the optimal features of each of the garments to maintain core temperature and comfort under intensive physical exertion. Four males and 2 females between the ages of 22 and 46 participated in this study. The garments evaluated were the Minnesota Advanced Cooling Suit (MACS-Delphi), Russian Orlan, NASA LCVG, MACS-Delphi without hood, and Russian Orlan without hood. Subjects were tested on different days in 2 different environmental chamber temperature/humidity conditions (24oC/H-28%; 35oC/H-20%). Each session consisted of stages of treadmill walking/running (250W to 700W at different stages) and rest. Skin and core temperatures, energy expenditure, heart rate, evaporative/nonevaporative sweat rate, and ratings of thermal comfort and heat sensation, overall and on specific body areas were measured throughout each session. There were significant differences among garments in femoralis temperature (p<0.001), and calf temperature (p<0.05); the LCVG was lowest in temperature on these areas. In general, the findings showed few consistent differences among the garments. The MACS-Delphi was better able to maintain subjects within a skin and core temperature comfort zone than was evident in the other garments as indicated by a lesser fluctuation in temperatures across physical exertion levels. The LCVG provided the greatest amount of cooling, in some conditions this resulted in body overcooling as noted in declines in skin temperature below a comfort level. Subjective ratings of thermal comfort were higher in the MACS-Delphi. Physiological findings comparing garments with and without the hood were inconclusive; however, subjects rated both the MACS-Delphi and the Orlan with hood as higher in overall thermal comfort.

 

Rationale for HRP Directed Research:

 

Research Impact/Earth Benefits: The findings of this research have application for optimal designs of cooling garments for firefighters, those donned in HAZMAT suits, and for military personnel active in extremely hot or cold environmental conditions.

 

Task Progress: This testing project has been completed and suggests that the design of cooling garments for lunar and Mars exploration in which considerable physical exertion is required can be enhanced by following principles of physiological design. The placement of garment tubing on body areas that are highly effective in transferring heat showed the greatest effectiveness in maintaining skin and core temperature within a physiological and subjective comfort zone. The findings also indicated that it is not necessary to induce excessive cooling through the garment to control core temperature during intense physical exertion. The garment with less but strategically placed tubing (MACS-Delphi) was rated by subjects as having both greater thermal and physical comfort, and also rated as more flexible during movements simulating exploration activities such as bending and kneeling. The findings were inconclusive regarding thermal stability with the inclusion of a hood vs. no hood.

 

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 02/07/2014) Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
Papers from Meeting Proceedings Koscheyev VS, Lee J-Y, Kim J-H, Leon GR, Kwon S, Gernhardt ML. "Cooling and thermal control strategies in the space suit for routine and emergency situations." 38th International Conference on Environmental Systems, San Francisco, Calif., June 30-July 3, 2008.

Proceedings of the 38th International Conference on Environmental Systems. SAE Technical Paper Series 2008-01-1993. Warrendale, PA : SAE International, 2008. , Jul-2008

Download in PDF pdf     
Fiscal Year: FY 2007  Task Last Updated:  10/11/2007 
PI Name: Koscheyev, Victor S Ph.D. 
Project Title: Test and Evaluation of Liquid Cooling Garments 
   
Division Name: Human Research 
Program/Discipline--
Element/Subdiscipline:
HUMAN RESEARCH--Operational and clinical research 
 
Joint Agency Name:  
Human Research Program Elements: (1) HHC:Human Health Countermeasures
Human Research Program Risks:: (1) EVA:Risk of Compromised EVA Crew Health and Performance Due to Inadequate EVA Suit Systems
Human Research Program Gaps: (1) EVA08:What are the metabolic costs of expected nominal & contingency suited tasks in exploration gravity environments and how can heat produced during exploration EVA effectively be removed?
PI Email: kosch002@umn.edu  Fax:  612-625-5149 
PI Organization Type: UNIVERSITY  Phone: 612-625-8827  
Organization Name: University of Minnesota 
PI Address 1: Jackson Hall, Department of Integrative Biology and Physiology 
PI Address 2: 321 Church Street, SE 
City: Minneapolis  State: MN 
Zip Code: 55455  Congressional District: 
Comments:  
Project Type: GROUND  Solicitation:  Directed Research 
Start Date: 06/01/2007  End Date:  03/31/2008 
No. of Post Docs: No. of PhD Degrees:   
No. of PhD Candidates:   No. of Master' Degrees:   
No. of Master's Candidates:   No. of Bachelor's Degrees:   
No. of Bachelor's Candidates:   Monitoring Center:  NASA JSC 
Contact Monitor:   Contact Phone:   
Contact Email:  
Flight Program:  
Flight Assignment: NOTE: Original end date was 12/31/2007; Received NCE to 3/31/2008 per PI (12/07)

 

Key Personnel Changes/Previous PI:  
COI Name (Institution): Gloria, Leon  ( University of Minnesota ) 
Grant/Contract No.: NNX07AI90A 
Performance Goal No.:  
Performance Goal Text:

 

Task Description: The aim of this research is to compare the physiological functioning and subjective comfort and thermal perception of subjects while donned in each of three liquid cooling garments and in two different environmental chamber conditions. Four males and four females between the ages of 25 and 45 will participate in this study. The liquid cooling garments evaluated are the Minnesota Advanced Cooling Suit (MACS-Delphi), the Russian Orlan, and the NASA liquid cooling/ventilating garment (LCVG). Subjects will be tested on different days in environmental chamber conditions set at 1.24 degrees C temperature, 22% humidity; and 2.35 degrees C, 22% humidity. Each session consists of stages of rest and walking on a treadmill, following the standard NASA exercise protocol. Skin and core temperature, energy expenditure, heart rate, sweat production, and ratings of physical comfort, comfort of specific body area, and thermal perceptions will be measured throughout each session. The optimal features of each of the garments will be identified to provide information on the ability of each garment to maintain core temperature and comfort under intensive physical exertion.

 

Rationale for HRP Directed Research:

 

Research Impact/Earth Benefits: 0

 

Task Progress: New award for FY2007.

 

Bibliography Type: Description: (Last Updated: 02/07/2014) Show Cumulative Bibliography Listing
 
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